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Full text of "Virginia Beach sun"

mmmmmmmmmamm^mB 




irginia Be 







Beach economic 
forecast clouded 
by uncertainty 



By LEE CAHILL 
City Council Reporter 

While economic forecasts — 
hardly a science — are always 
based on assumptions, estimates 
and a certain number of "what 
ifs," the "what ifs" are especially 
prominent diis year. 

As E. Dean Block, the city's 
director of management and the 
budget, looked through his glass 
ball to forecast the city's 
economic state for the fiscal 
years 1997-^)01, he saw darkly. A 
cloud was over the part where the 
federal and state governmenis 
were shuffling monies and 
responsibilities. 

The amount of money that 
would eventually be siphoned to 
Virginia Beach is a worry, but 
Block said that added to that are 
the effects beyond the funding — 
how would the city, at the low 
end of the totem pole, take care 
of the problems that would 
develop when federal and state 
programs are funded at lower 
level or abandoned to the 
localities altogether. 

When 40 percent of the current 
$838 million operating budget, 
less public utilities, comes from 
state and federal sources, the 
concern is legitimate. 

The present system of 
federal/state/local economic roles 
has evolved over the past 60 
years, but the system will change 
dramatically over the next several 
years. Block said, as the 
gbvemment is about to de-entide. 

Most likely, he said, more 
responsibility will be delegated to 
the states which will have more 
freedom. The government may 
shrink, he said, but the ne«ls will 
not go away. 

"Can we expect the local 
government drawing from the real 
estate tax to take over?" he 
asked. 

The state and federal funds are 
used in critical services, he said, 
such as public safety and 
corrections, constitutional offices, 
social services and mental health 
and schools. A 5-percent 
reduction in federal and state aid 
would be $15.6 million, which 
would required a nine-cent real 
estate tax rate increase to 
replace. 

In. titling his forecast, 
"Expectation Versus Reality." he 



told city council at a recent work 
session, he was undalining need 
for the city to reconcile 
competing forces over the next 
several years. 

To take car2 of the "what its," 
Dean prepared three scenarios — 
the baseline expenditure scenario, 
the local revenue scenario, and 
the stale and federal revenue 
scenario. Because of the unsettled 
state state of federal and state 
affairs, he said, it was not 
possible to provide one forecast. 

If the city provides and 
continuation of basic services the 
operating expenditures will grow 
— to $885 million in 1996-97; 
$921.4 million in 1997-98; $952.3 
million in 1998-99; $995.3 million 
in 1999-2000. and $1 billion in 
2000-01. 

At the same time funding is 
uncertain. Block said, the 
demands for city services are 
increasing at a faster rate than the 
increase in population. 

Block reminded council that 
during the 1980s the city spent 
$300,000 a year for maternity 
care of indigent women because 
of the limitation on Medicaid 
reimbursement rates. 

Changes in food stamps, 
Medicaid and AFDC Assistance 
to Families with Dependent 
Children do not appear in the 
budget, but represent some $100 
million in payments a year. 

Block suggested four possible 
scenarios for federal and state 
funding, but acknowledged that 
there are countless other 
possibilities. 

But to be reidy ftjf the 
unpredictable, the staff 
recommends that all dq}artments 
develop contingency plans of five 
and 10 percent reduction from 
their departmental budget targets; 
institute a hiring freeze and 

monitor and provide updates on 
new developments in the 
unfolding federal and state budget 
processes. 

City Manager James K. Spore 
has recommended a workshop on 
Jan. 9 to discuss the governor's 
budget and to plan workshops to 
discuss the federal budget after it 
is adopted. 

And avoid or defer new 
commitments involving recurring 
costs. 



Dedication of Beth Chaverim 
synagogue planned for Dec. 10 



The long-awaited dedication of 
the Congregation Beth Chaverim 
synagogue will take place on 
Sunday, Dec. 10 beginning at 3 
pjn. 

The building is situated on the 
corner of Rosemont and 
Stoneshore roads in Virginia 
Beach. The public is cordially 
invited, but seating will be 
limited. 

A large crowd is expect»i fw 
the festive event, which will 
Include choir music and the 
sounding of the Shofar; 
congreganu will be joined that 
day by religious and political 
lexers fh>m throughout the area. 
The dedication address will be 
delivered by Rabbi Paul Menitoff, 
executive vice president of the 
Central ConfereiK:e of Amoican 
Rabbis, a national Jewish 
lead^ship organization. Rabbi 
Menitoff will be traveling to 
Hvnpttjn Roads from New Yoik 
tot tte occasion. 

Congregation Beth Chaverim 
— the reform Jewish congr^atim 
of Virginia Beach — is 
cofflideting its 13th year, and for 
the past 10 yean the conpepttcm 
has worshipi^ and otherwise 
gtthoed at the Roman Catholic 
Church of the Ascension on 
Prints AiiM R«kL 

The relationship between the 
Parish and the Jewish 
congregation is both diMinctive 
and unique, when vie«^ within a 
larger framework of relations 
hMw^ the two major rriigiout 
denominations. This Virginia 
B«aeh relatioRihip has been 
chnwuriMd by Biriwtp Walw 



Sullivan of Richmond and by 
Rabbi Zoberman as a one-of-a- 
kind-in-the-world interfaith union. 

The spiritual bond between the 
Ascension and Beth Chaverim 
membership has remained close 
and intimate throughout the 10- 
year period. At the same time, 
both Ascension and Beth 
Chaverim have maintained their 
own individual and separate 
worship services, educational and 
social activities. 

Over die years, members of the 
Beth Chaverim congregation have 
workKl to develop sufficKnt funds 
to erect a synagogue. Even in the 
midst of the final days of 
constnution, a ma^ fund raising 
drive is under way. 

For a congregation of modest 
means, the effort to achieve ia 
own home has come at a slow, 
but steady, arduous pace. Many 
Beth Qjaverim congregants have 
contributed to the effort by 
off^ing their own time, tatoit iM 
labw — in a wide vmcty of ways 
— to the building task. 

The congregation has crea^ 
and maintained a religious Khool 
and has continued unfailingly to 
participate in a full, ongoing 
^hcdule of wOTship services. It 
has al»} been in^v»l in Jewidi 
youth proj«:ts and community 
servk« |MO|ects. 

Warren E|»teio A Anociatts 
Inc., of Atlantt, Ga.. tamUed (he 
architectural work for the 
conpegation, E. T. Oresham 
company Inc. of Nwfott it the 
General Cont2^:tw. D^mcdm 
and matp^ financnf tf being 
provided by Central Fidelity 
Bank. 



'Holiday Lights' come to the Beach 

City opens boardwalk to cars for first time ever 



By M.J.KNOBLOCK 
Sun Correspondent 

Santa Claus sparkles in the 
night, hanging out in his lawn 
chair under an umbrella beside 
the oceanfront boardwalk, as car 
after car passes by. 

He does this every night. But 
this is not a deadbeat Kris 
Kringle, whiling away the winter. 
Ws spreading holiday cheer. 

Santa Claus is part of "Holiday 
Lights at the Beach." a display of 
250.000 to 300.000 lights 
stretching from 8th to 33rd Street. 

For $7 per car. folks can drive 
down the boardwalk — for the 
first time since the concrete 
structure was established in 1928 
— as they take in the colorful, 
twinkling display of lights with a 
nautical theme. 

"The most unique thing about 
ours is there's no other place on 
the East Coast where you can ride 
on the boardwalk," said Sandy 



Jackson, co-chair of the Holiday 
Lights at the Beach Committee 
formed through the Virginia 
Beach H(»el Motel Association. 

"I think between having the 
Atlantic ocean as a back drop and 
die nautically-lhemed displays, it 
gives you the impression of 
driving undwwatw." 

Jackson, who has worked with 
co-chair Cathy Pender to make 
Uiis a reality, said the point of the 
light display is to dress up the 
oceanfront during the holiday 
season, as well as give people a 
reason to come to the beach in 
the winter. 

Until this year, the only holiday 
lights on Atlantic and Pacific 
avenues were endeavors by 
individual businesses. Some areas 
had no decorations at all. At 
times, the oceanfront area 
resembled a ghost town. 

"We looked like the Grinch 
who stole Chrismas, ^> until this 




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The pi^ II «MMiM^tr «• !«^ leieh MttI 



year," said Jackswi. "As far as the 
community goes, we're excited. 
It's great to have activity at the 
oceanfront' 

Pend» and Jackson began the 
proj»:t in October of 1994, but 
permits and other stipulations 
were not apj^oved until June 27 
of this year. 

"We've had four-and-a-half 
months to pull this o^," grinned 
Jackson. 

Using a loan of up to $750,000 
from the Tourism Growth 
Investment Fund (TGIF) 
administered by the Resort Area 
Advisory Commission, the project 
became a reality. The loan is to 
be paid back in a six- to eight- 
yea' window. 

"All the money collected this 
year from the $7 vehicle fw will 
go back to paying for our TGIF 
loan and also operating expenses 
for 1996 and for new displays," 
said Jackson. 

In the first four nights of the 
Holiday Lights at the Beach, 
which started the night before 
Thanksgiving, about 6.700 cars 
passed Ihrou^. 

A steady string of cars each 
night begins at the 8th Street 
entrance and tracks south to the 
loop at Rudee Inlet in one lane, 
while through traffic to area 
businesses rolls by in the other 
tane. 

"I think the biggest challenge is 
making sure we don't 
inconvenience anyone, whether 
it's a resident or a business 
owner." said Jackson. 

"We don't want them to tm 
derogatorily effected, ^ we work 
with our volunteers, police, 
business and traffic conOol," she 
added. "We want everyone to 
enjoy it. We want it to be 
something they look forward to, 
ncM son^Uiing they <ke«]." 

The boardwalk and bike path 

Q 8m Ha.»AY, INige 6 



"fl 




Farmpark is 
studied as 
attraction 
on Farmer's 
market site 

By LEE CAHILL 
City CoundJ Reporter 

The Farmer's Market Task 
Force has recommended the 
development of a Fjfftrpark which 
would be built in three phases at 
an estimated cost of $12.5 
million. 

The Farmpark would be 
designed to serve as a tourist 
attractions and as an educational 
resource for agriculture. 

A study prepared by Economics 
Research Asaxjiates of McLean, 
proposes for phase I the 
construction of a farmers market 
($2.8 million), which would 
replace the present Farmer's 
Market at Landstown and 
Princess Anne roads; phase II, 
an agricultural village, buildings 
and outdoor exhibits and 
restaurant ($3.8 million); and, 
phase III, and agricultural village 
interpretive center ($5.9 million). 

Consultants suggests a 100-acre 
S'te to allow for expansion and 
estimate that attendance for the 
first phase, the buildings and 
outdoor demonstration areas will 
be approximately 75,000. 
Attendance at the agricultural 
village is estimated at 160.000. 

Louis E. Cullipher. director of 
agriculture and chairman of the 
task force, told Virginia Beach 
City Council at a recent workshop 
that the model for the local 
operation would be Lake County 
Farmpark in Kirkland, Ohio, 
which emphasizes current 
agricultural processes. The Ohio 
cento has a plant science center. 
8B imtoor arsb a b^nyatd and an 
outdoor arena. 

Although as proposed the 
Virginia Beach project would 
operate at a deficit — $480,000 a 
year when all the programs are in 
place, the report points to 
substantial spin-off benefits. 

The construction would 
generate some $4.8 million in 
local building industry payroll, 
the park's operation would 
generate $1.6 million in lodging 
expenditures and $1.1 million in 
restaurant sales, and on -site and 

The next Step for 
the task force is 
proceeding with 
a funding option 
and locating 
a site. 

off-site expenditures would 
generate approximately $300,000 
in annual tax revenues for the 
city. 

Some council members 
suggested that the inclusion of an 
equestrian center, considered by 
the tai^ force but not part of the 
proposed plan, would generate 
mcHe interest and«more income. 

The next step f<a die task tfxct 
is proceeding with a funding 
(^tion and locating a site. 

The Farmpark could be located 
at the present Farmer's Market 
site, which has drawbacks 
b^ause of Uie access, or in a 
more densely-populated area of 
the city such as the Lake 
Trashmore area w in IHmgo. 

Cullipher said that such a 
project would "allow us...to have a 
sense of connection with our 
environment." 

Vice Mayor William D, 
Sessoms Jr. said that an 
equestrian center could be a 
major revenue producer and that 
local residents are interest^ in 
such a project. 

Councilwoman Barbara Hentey 
said that the city already has a 
number of privately-owned ^1 
operated equestrian operatitms 
WKl that the publk seems stouU 
be careful about competing witt 
ttem. 

Sessoms said that a number of 
these owners feel that an 
equestrian center is needed to 
mna the l»ti» shows. 

Councilman Louis R. JoMs 
suggested thtt the task force toek 
into anythiiv tet i^uld md% dw 
figures m<ve ^raii&le, im;lndi^ 
an equesBian cmm. 



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2 Vinrinia Be«eh San. Priday. De<xmto 1. 1995 




World AIDS Day 

It Is a crisis that, despite a bombardment of 
statistics and awareness education, continues 
to ^ow here at home In the United States and 
around^e world: AIDS. 

The leading cause of death among Americans 
aged 25 to 44, more have died from this killer 
than all those who perished in the Gulf. 
Vietnam and Korean wars combined. 
Worldwide, an estimated 20 million people 
have been infected with HIV, according to the 
Tidewater AIDS Crisis Taskforce. 

In an effort to turn the tide, residents from 
across Hampton Roads are Joining forces 
Friday for the annual observance of World 
AIDS Day. An international day of coordinated 
activities against the spread of HIV/ AIDS. 190 
countries around the world unite for this 
observance coordinated by the American 
Association for World Health. 

The designated theme for World AIDS Day 
1995 is "Shared Rights. Shared 
Responsibilities," emphasizing personal, 
community, government and international 
responses to the AIDS epidemic. 

Here at home. The Chrysler Museum of Art 
will hold Its seventh annual Day Without Art. 
instituted by the arts community in 
recognition of the losses suffered within the 
art world. In a program beginning at 12:30 
p.m.. The Chrysler will host an hour-long 
program in which area artists contribute their 
talents In a program honoring those affected 
by the spread of AIDS — and to offer hope for 
an AIDS-free future. 

OtlifciL.observances around Hampton Roads 
Include presentations by the Eastern Virginia 
AIDS Coalition at the Waterside Marketplace 
from 5-9 p.m.; "Trees of Ufe" in the lobby of 
Sentara Norfolk General from Dec. 1-31; and, 
a "Tree of Names" on display at Chesapeake 
Square Mall from Dec. 1-31 featuring hand- 
made ornaments with the names of those who 
have did irom AIDS this year. 

At 1:50 p.m., bells will rung 15 times by 
churches and individuals around the world to 
commemorate 15 years of losses caused by 
the spread of AIDS. 

All communities are being affected by the 
continuing AIDS crisis. No one is Immune. 
Pause and reflect on that message this World 
AIDS Day. — V.E.H. 



Oh, the gluttony of it all! 
Here's something to ponder... 




(HfThB 
Cuff 

HaAt.editm- 



Hqx )^Hi ^ had as fine a Tuifcey 
Day^wedcasldid] 

As I write this, I'm still avwing 

the ttought of succulent gobbler 

baited in Msown juices, lasty s%isage 

staffing, plump yams, quivering 

cranberry 

sauce and 

t a n g y 

mincemeat 

pie. Mmm. 

onnm! 

Sitting 
down at die 
table, 
however. 
Mom (eva 
the "eagle 
eye") noted 
she was 
surprised 
thatldi(ta'( 
m$kt quHdc 
reference m 
my Huudcs- 
giving 
colmnn to a 
catm nadilion I uphold ev^ yess. 
So, (a die sake of pleasing her (we 
aU hive to keqi moms Irappy. after 
aB). here goo. 

Many yeas ^o, while Did was 
aiU Uvi^ he pcoudly Isou^ hcMiK 
a large IdtGiien scide for Mirni to use. 
She Qfed die tti^ (wuioiBly and 

— and I aerioufy (knbt if Ae eva 
usoik. 

The only action dutt ote' Tc^do 
scafe evc^ aw was oik^ a year, on 
TbBdc^ving, viicai I Uxk it Ajwn. 
wiped (if Ae ^A «d checked k for 
mxaancy. Why woold I do sudi a 
dung? 

WelI,b»f^siinq)iei^)mUeieen. 
I watetei a teteviiwa pi^nun 
recCTtly about die glatUMy of 
Americans: how we consume, 
connune, and asmmm tome move, 
white others Moonl the wcM fo 
ho^y. 

Thus, with the scale I was 
deismu^ to Me ^ tow mch I 
owld &3^mm — arf how n^ 
worid go wut^ — from my 
Thai^^^^^ri. 
Miand^biMmttai^IwM 



So wim did I do? First I weighed 
die plitte (an onfi^vy. empty dinn»^ 
plate which, (rf coarse, I wouldn't 
consume). Aha! Abmit six ounces. 
Fine, had that out of the way. 

Next, I b^an piling on tie tuikey 
and all the uimming, not forgetting 
the ccmdimoitsandextra goodies like 
pickles and olives. 

Then, getting up from the table, I 
marched dramatically to the scale 
with plate in hand and caiefiilly{^aced 
it there. The plate plus food weighed 
roughly duee pounds. Pretty hefty, if 
I do siqr so myself. But. in my own 
deiaisc, l& me remind you dat mcst 
of us are a|A to indul^ more Uwi 
usual during die holidays. 

I sat back down and hungrily dug 
into die meal. Boy, was it good, as all 
of Mom's food was and is! 

About 30 minutes later, I had 
devowed my fill. Iliere was sti U some 
food teft on die pltte, and my belly 
Mt like it was going to bust Still, 1 
had 10 have some of Mm's pie. I 
weigtod diat on a smalter (tessert 
plate. 

Ifeartily stuffed and poaning with 
pteasure, I heaved myself from the 
tMbk, plates in hand, and heacted (w 
die sc^. How much had Iconsumed? 
What would be die fin^ take? 

The scale would soon reveal diat 

Two ounces of scraps fcmained on 
die dimw plate. The cbsseit plate 
was pr^tk»lly IkJ^d cl«m. lliat 
meait, to my diaimy «id ONnting 
die siij> of pie, diM I had coisumed 
about three pouncb of food. 

"Ttaee pmuKk m me si^gf I 
said m dirixfef . 

I «^^i6d tlw plate apui. Y^, 
dseepou^. 

'^dl, I didn't wa^ much; tint's 
fot siBV." I (Ascaved. "But I fed Uke 
I'm ^g to explode. I (kxi't feel % 
«^. I think I ate way ttx) much. Did 
yrakMJwAeMamchttonlytesize 
of ytm bfO Thtf 's r^y all you 
need u fill it up." 

My family look^ at me with 

"You know," grimed me (rf my 
hcAers, ever die wisecnck, "I diink 
jKW MNild have sioniedtt 1 .5 pcwids 
MdfoifotMid»pk." 

lMxMdy.ItaMrtewei^l 




School with a whole 'Lott' of learning 




Rlctimi 
Response 

By Robert 
Holland, cdum- 
niat 



By Robert G. HoUand 

HOUSTON, Texas — TTianks- 
giving came early fOT me diis yem. I 
was privileged to spend sevaal hours 
November 13 and 14 visiting Wesley 
Elementsy School here and chatting 
widi Thadtteus Lott, Sr., a legraidffiy 
educates. 

Wten school ended, md, rehtc- 
tandy, I had to leave, I felt like 
kneeling and 
kissing the 
fkxwof this old 
me-story brick 
school. For 
believers in 
basic edu- 
cation, this is 
holy ground, 
and Lott is 
Saint Thad- 
deus. Cer- 
tainly, his 
school's hall- 
ways are as 
gleamingly 
spotless as a 
temple's 
should be. 
They're kissable. But diat's jiKt die 
surface of this school's essential 
goodness. 

To reach Wesley, it is necessary to 
journey duough one of Ifoustm!s 
poorest neighborhocMis. Later, I 
learned diat Acres Homes is a bku;k 
community with a proud history and 
me that has macte strkies against 
dru^, crime, and decay. But an 
Anglo's qualms were heightened 
upon readiing die school Old ftiding 
it encircled by fencing with a 
barbedwire tqpping to disccMirage 
vmdals. 

Inside, die ambience was totally 
transformed— not mly immaculate 
but well-ordered, friendly, and 
puipc^eful. Childr»ichanging clasps 
lined up in neat rows down die right 
side of die halls — widi ik> upnsar, no 
unruliness. Staff greeted all visitors 
widi smiles and courtesy. 

And from classrooms dirou^KMit 
die school came the endiusiastic ca- 
dences of beginning readers sounding 
out dieir vowels and consmants in 
unism. 

To diwe who believe in a sys- 
tematic phonetic af^mach vo initial 
reading instnicdem. diose sounds are 
music (sometimes literally) to die 
ears. 

And it is die swMt tune of success 
for a school diat is 96 percent black, 
with three-fourUis m go^^nment 
lunch. Blackness is sujqxKed to 
equate widi educatimalbleakne^, if 
you believe dw defeatists ot die 
racists. Bitt Lott has explo<ted die 
mydis. His children's achievemoit 
averages put those of many yun>ie- 
fied suburl^i schools lo shame. 



Three years after Lott became 
princip^of Westey in 1975 (retuming 
to his native community where his 
bdiNhadbeaiaministaXdiinigrade 
reading scores on die Iowa Tests of 
Basic Skills had risoi from 2.7 to 3.8. 

That meantdieaveragediird grader 
was reading d)out 8 mmdis above 
diird grade level By 1987, Wesl^ 
ranked in die top 10 percent of 
Houstm's schools on d» Three R's 
(23fd mt of 232 «;hools). And diose 
above it served silk sttidcing neigh- 
bwhoods compared to Acres Homes. 

The Iraditim of excellence con- 
tinues: 98 percent of Wesley's diird 
graders pas%d die reading portion of 
die Texas Academic As%ssnent 
System test of basic skills diis year. 
That was up from a 95 percent pac- 
ing rate for 1994. 

Lott devoudy believes in phonics. 
"If a child learns to decode woids," 
he says, "he will then move on to 
comprehension and building 

Later, i learned 
that Acres Homes 

is a black 

community witti 

a proud history 

and one that 

has made 

strides against 

drugs, crime 

and decay. 

vocabulary." Similarly for 
miKh-touted higher crder diinking 
skills; "We have to do b«h (higher 
(wder and basic skills)," says Lott, 
adding rtietorically, "TTie only diing 
is, which comes first?" Clearly his 
spptf^ch is to lay a basic foundatk}n 
first, which constitutes the cmimon 
sense sadly missing in die educatim 
lominessofthe'90s. 

Lott also believes in Saxon madi, 
which is not die conceptual, feel good 
New Madi, but madi in which piqiils 
actually are taught Uuough drill U) 
arrive at correct answers— no esti- 
mating, no calculators as cruK:tws. 

More generally, Lott is one of the 
nation's leadingproponentsof Direct 
Instruction— diat is, tether directed 
instnictim. He expats much of his 
teachers: "We hire smart young 
people who will woik hard. We aOc 
to diem to find out dieir level of 
commitment." And dwy are Ought 
inhouse to vtach phonics, since few 
schools of education any longer do 
so. 

Imagiiw diat: This educator be- 
Ikves in teachers as teadios. MX 



te«;hers as facilitauns. If you want to 
draw a chudUe fitmi Lott (which is 
not hard to do), ^t him waited m 
facfliiators aid chiki-diiected edu- 
cation. "Can you picture going into a 
classof hind^' (kind»gvtners),aiKl 
arcing, 'Well, children, what are we 
going to study today?," he guffiawed. 

"We challmge die new teacher to 
becomeanexcel^t teacher," he sakl. 
"We don't put the blame on the 
children; we put the responsibility m 
tcachCTS." 

Such beliefs ha^ made lliaddeus 
Lott a mavoidc widiin the effete 
world of progressive education — 
much as IX}ug Wildo- is a mavoick 
widun a liboal Doimcratic Party. 
Apart from bang black men of die 
same generatim (Lott is 61), who 
had to fight die indignities and inde- 
cmcy of state-imposed segregation, 
bodi are unwilling to suffer focds 
gladly. 

At times, Lott has had to fight 
foolishness, and worse, widiin his 
own school district. In 1986, a 
gung-ho proponent of whole lan- 
guage — the mediodology diat pre- 
sumes children will learn to read, as 
though by osmosis, if surrounded by 
good books — took over as 
superinten(fent and ordered phonics 
b^ished. (Jim was abmt the stune 
time die whole stitte of California 
executed the same brainless manni- 
ver, as a result of which the Golden 
State has plummeted to (teadlast in 
reading scores.) Lott flat-dab 
refused — die only principal to hang 
tough. He knew whiat wmked for his 
pupils. 

Afta a wm' of attritim, in which 
Wesley's supplies were cut, an 
administrator s^ged a raid in 1991 
intended to show that a Wesley 
teacher had cheated to pump up 
scores — die insinuation being diat 
only dtfough such subterfuge muld 
an overwhelmingly black school 
outscore "white" schools. When die 
probe was shown to be bogus, and 
was exposed m natimal tetevisim, 
the superintendent (who was soon 
history) abjecdy apologized. 

Today the bureaucratic situation 
has improved. Lott recentiy has been 
promoted to manager of a cluster of 
four clmr^schools. and his kmgtime 
instructional assistant. Suzie Rimes, 
has tdcen over as Wesley's pincipal. 
Ideally, dus will enable Lott to spread 
the benefits of direct instruction moK 
widely. 

If Thadttois Lott schools were 
availableas an (^tion in every school 
district in die Imid, diat would b^a 
grett blessing for Uie children of 
Ammca. 

Robert Holland is a syndicated 
colimnist who writes for Associated 
Features. 








^ 



'I WKHM^ ... art tt^r* 
lo iraw 



» «qf im. &mmm imedy •nough 




The Real 
World 

By B.J. Sea- 
siona, aenior col- 
umni^ 



U.S.A. should 
tread lightly 
into some other 
nations' affairs 

The Army's tcq) general, Doinis 
ReiniK, saui in spiking of soiduig 
in tKxqis to Bosnia, "U we make a 
commiooem to diis, we'w got to 
expea some type of camialties." 

He ^ive no ^dmate of how many 
U.S. troqis might be killed. 

In explaining Bill Clinton's 
positim OB die matta. White Ifouse 
Press Sec- 
retary Mike 
McCurry 
said, "That is 
a risk this 
president 
diinksiswell 
wcsdiiL" 

Hiat state- 
ment by 
McCurry 
made me 
want to puke. 
The hawk- 
ish position 
Clintm now 
takes on 
Bosnia is a 

far ay hbm 

the cowardly 

* onehehadon 

Viettiam. Of courae, diat was when 

he diought his butt wouM be sent 

ovo' there. 

He fdt so strongly about diat war 
that he went toEngland and Russia to 
protest, consequendy giving aid imd 
comfort to the enemy while 
Americans were dying for their 
country. 

Regardless of what position one 
takes on die Vietnam war, our troofK 
had beoi cmimitied. To protest in a 
foreign coimtry, especidly Russia, 
who was furnishing weapons to North 
Vietnam to kill Americans, is 
unconscionable. The fact about die 
Bosnian war is diat it is predicated on 
"edinic cleansing," and a war of diat 
type could continue to go m for years 
widi no final solution. 

Already die so-called "peace plan" 
is breaking down. Mmiy So-bs do not 
support die {dan, and fighting has 
iMokm out around Sarajevo. 

They arc saying, "We'll die if we 
have to." N^ally, if diey arc willing 
to die they will hav^ no compunctim 
about taking some Americans widi 
diem. The situation in Bosnia will be 
worae timi diat in Viettiam. where 
diere >ras no clear eneny , and by die 
time dwy woe identified U.S ttoops 
were dead. 

One of Clinim's argumraits f(a 
sending troops lo Boaua is Uiat 
"America can no kmger stOMl by and 
watch dteatrocitiesdutthaveocoirred 
in nearly four years of ethnic vio^ce 
in B(»nia." 

What about die inhumanity and 
atrocities diat are occurring right here 
in America, Bill? Shoildn't we take 
care of diat before we start sliding 
troops to every countty diat has a 
civil war? William Perry, Clinton's 
seoetary of D^ense, tecen&y said, 
"Amoican values and interests are at < 
stalre." 

Now what in die hell does di^ 
mean? It's just a bunch of doirtile talk 
coming from representatives of a 
president who wouM iK}t fight f(s 
this country and now wants to %nd 
somebody else's sons and daughters 
to do what he vrauldn't do. 

Welcome to die real worM. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

138 Siwth RoanBMt Road 

Suite 209 

VIrgtata BeMh, Va. 23452 

TekphMc: ^04) 4M-3430 

(USPSMft-140) 



PabUer 
HanesBy^y 

EdltkHtdSupcrvtaor 
Jamk Brown 

Edtor 

Victoria Hedtt 

CompodtioB 
MJ.Knobkx4 

Hm Vffgiiua Beadi Sun i* pub- 
lidMdevoy l^day Igf By»^ PabUca- 
tioni. Inc., 1000 Armory Drive, 
I^nUin,V!rgmia238Sl.Seoondaan 
po(^ ]Hdd m ]T«ydiii, Vii^aw md 
a iM it i Mi al any offices. Putoiulen 
Seal atten dtapa to 1000 Aimoiy 
Dm% ftuddm. Vksiaia 238S1. Sdv 
Kdpdoa Rmm: By mdl adtfaenes 
widiin ^ m^ of Virgmia Beidi, 
Va., ooa yee, $14.93, two ya^, 
$2CSa Vkpma aid Nordt CaRdim, 
one j^ff. $16.^, two ytaa, $^50. 
AQ odw KMH i»e y^, K2.0Q, two 
y^ ^ JO. I^dte n a^mce. 

Odier Bjw^ ftU^deni SMv- 
pqpoK "Urn C% a t^riM PtMt, The 
PmMmnA Tmm, Ite Tidewats 
Ne««,1teBnmiwid:1tea-G^M^ 
Tha Irtipadaat Utua^m, The 
DimMla MoiteL Tlw 



\. 



Vifginia Beach Sun. Friday. December 1. 1^5 3 



Automated jury system 
keeps court on track 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meytfa 
Obemdarf 



The OJ. Simeon jury trial Yaa 
giv«i the world a skewed and 
fiil^taring visioii of joy ditty m 
Amorica. I am proud to say the 
Viiginia Beach Qrrait Ctml jmy 
s^tnn Is in no way eooipanMe to 
whtt is taking id«x in Los An^^. 
Vii^uua B«Kh has «cihi<M e\^fy 
effort to 
provide its 
cidzois widi 
a quality and 
credible jury 
system tlutt is 
both user- 
friendly and 
ojsteffidaiL 
In this 
column, I 
wiU highlight 
the major 
procedural 
and admin- 
istrativefeat- 
ures of the 
Circuit 
Court's jury 
system. 

By Vir- 
ginia statute, 
the court utilizes a tvra-st^ pm^ss 
of summonsing jurcHis. In September 
of each year, the court's automated 
jury management system (JMS) 
ramiomly selects 24,000 i»t^)ective 
jurois from Emerged listof registoed 
voters and drivers that reside in 
Vir^nia Beach. To detomine the 
prospectivejioors' qualifications, the 
court mails each of the 24,000 
prospective jurors a juror 
questionnaire. 

Nine qjpointed jury commissionos 
convene for a single day to review the 
24,000 questionnaires and to select 
7,200 qualified jurors to sumiiKms 
for die upcoming yev. On the first 
Thursday of the month, JMS 
randomly selects 600 jurors to 
summons for the next term of service 
(i.e., one month). 

The Viiginia Beach Circuit Court 
opmites a hybrid two day-one trial 
system. JMS randomly assigns each 
juror one-day-a-week to be on call 
for the torn (e.g., all Mondays in 
September). Jurks ve cm-call two- 
five days and serve an aver^ of 2.5 
days throughout their term. Should a 
juror sit on a trial, JMS will bypass 
that juror until every remaining juior 
has sat on a trial. To provide greater 
schedttlif^ flexibility for the jurors, 
the courts gnuits first time defemds 
upaireque^oamonth chosen by the 
juror. Additionally, the (x>urt%ill 
switch assigned call-in days upon 
request (e.g., all Moidays to all 
Thursdays). 

In July of 1994, the court 
established a new procedure to 
compensatethe jurors. VirginiaBeach 
joined an elite few jurisdictions diat 
provide juror compensation on die 
same day of sovice. The court inints 
and distributes, daily, a $30 check to 
each juror up<xi their release for the 
day. Jurors can quickly and easily 
cash their checks at the court's bank, 
located next to the Judicial COiter. 
TheCircuitOnirt utilize die latest 
technological tools to provide a cost 
efHcient and effective jury syston. 
The court runs JMS software, 
produced by Van guard Management 
Information systems, on a SO-statkni 
Novel Local Area Network. JMS 
advanced features include the 
following: 

■ lasN scanning to cuva yaax 
attendance, juror tracking and jun^ 
payroll information; 

■ A verified random number 



genottor; 

■ High qwed lascrprintingttf jiaor 
questionnaires. Juror Summons, 
compensation checks. Service 
Certification letters, and all the 
statutory rqxxts; and, 

■ Comprehensive payroll 
functions. 

The softvrare is upgnuled annually 
to take advantage of the rapid 
evolution of technology. In addilkin 
to the computer t^hnology , thecourt 
uses cable television to br^fcast die 
Jury Orientation film twice-a-wedc 
thrnighout die term of s^ce uid 
allows prospective jurws to use 
facsimile nuudiines lo letuin juit»' 
questionnaire. 

Through the responsible 
application of technolt^, the court 
can effectively manage die jury 
system of die se(x>nd Ivgest Circuit 
Court in Viiginia widi a single full- 
time employee. Most courts, of 
comi»nd)le size, emptoy a minimum 
of three full-time staff roemb^s. This 
fact becomes more impressive when 
considering that the court has 
centralized functions previously 
perforniedbyodierdepariinents.such 
as payroll, printing and summons 
piqjaratxm. 

The most imique feature of die 



The software is 

upgraded 

annually to take 

advantage of the 

rapid evolution of 

technology, in 

addition to the 

computer 

technology, the 

court uses cable 

television to 

broadcast the 

Jury Orientation 

film twice-a-week 

throughout the 

term of service. 



court's jiBy managemott system Is 
die usecrf' volunteers. A very dedkaied 
volunteer employee provides 
valuable assistance to die jury 
administtaicrduiingpakworic hours. 
Hie volunteo' takes attoidance (i.e., 
Ias» scans jtoor badges), answers 
die telq)hone,distritHries wok letters, 
distributes checks, aissist with 
ntentadon and odier administrative 
tasks. 

The court also employs compute? 
science studoits from Kellam lOgh 
School to enter the statutory 
information from die 7,200 annually 
chosen qualified jurors. These 
students pericmn essoitial wcnk diat 
would nramally require tl» attentkm 
of die fuU-time staff. 

In an era of fiscal constraint and 
exploding court dockets.the Virginia 
Beach Circuit Q)urt has implem^ted 
ajurymffliagen^nt system thatisone 
ofdiemosttechnologicallyadvmiced, 
labor eCGcent, fiscally re^ionsible 
and user-friendly systems in die 
nwntiy. 

Matt Benefiel, court administr<uor 
for the city of Virginia Beach, 
coMributed to this column. 



Public's assistance sought in 
solving November theft, attack 




Detectives are investigating the 
theft of ttwls valued at more than 
$30,000. A tip could help return die 
stolen pn^rty to the owners iuid 
earn the callo' a cash reward. 

During die 
night of 
Tuesday, 
Nov. 7 some- 
one broke 
into die Auto 
Craft Express 
in the 900 
block of 
South Mili- 
ary Highway 
duougharear 
window , 
On(% in side, 
they remov- 
ed nun^rous 
hand tools, 
hmdnani^: 
Snap-On, 
Mateo, Vul- 

can, Mac, 

"■""*""■""*" American, 
Northern and 
Bluepotnt. Also tulen was an 
Andiowx ceUulv |Aam, a PmMx 
cum ^ a blvdt tei^ tNMcMe. 
The same theives may te 
r^pmibte for thefts ni te Ums& 
comiMund of E.V. Williams 
C^^iy also in die 900 block of 
SoiJfcMiltatfy Hl^way . Missingwe 



Crime 
Solars 

By Dtttetivt 
Michael G. Der- 
went, Virginia 
Bwsh Mum De. 
partment 



numerous hand tools and four Honda 
generatOTS. 

Anyone widi infonnation about die 
d^fts or die location of die stolen 
tools should call Crime Sdvers at 
427-0000. Qeh rewards are pdd for 
die recovoy of die im^rty <x die 
Idlest of die peqi^ responsible. 

A nian attacked a 30-year-old 
woman in her apartment and 
detectives would like your help 
i(^tifying him. 

Ob W«liKsday, Nov. 1 about I 
a.m., die wwnan was awakoied by a 
man in h«' bedrocm on Ch^jel LidK 
IM^in^Oi^dLateApmnients. 
When dte man attckedandattempted 
to sexually assault to", she scream^ 
awl fought tack. The msi dten ran 
outdiefrraitdom'. 

He is (tecrfl)^ as black, in his late 

Qdl,wittaai^^nlKiild,A(Mtl^dt 
hmr and may have a di^t mi^ache 
and be«d. He wu wearing fiKled 
blue j«is, awl wMiB slui Md a j^ 

Ifywiha^iitfommMM^callCrin^ 
Sol^^s m. 427-0000. C^Us on be 

IMMfe W IWUl a diy MMl ME Ml 

re(wd^. a revranl fdwpta $1,000 
will be |Mid fw infiMmatkn diat k^ 
tommtmL 



Up close and personal 

<:J\oljEn£ ^Lo{7£x^%.: iDui±iancknq ^xmoihitaLlJnihuctox 



By VICTORIA HECHT 
Sun EdMx- 

To call Rob^t L. Glover Jr. "a people 
person" would be describing him lightly — 
for diat just begins to scratch die surface of 
Virginia's recipient of the 1995 Governor's 
Awffld for Oitstanding I^ehospital Instructor. 
A resident of Chesapeake and 
firefighier/instnictor for die Virginia Beach 
Fire Department, as well as an instnxitor for 
die Viiginia Beach Department of EMS and 
a volunteer paramedic. Glover has made a 
career of sharing die gift of life — or how to 
preserve it — with others. 

"I started Uiis right out of high school- 
said Glover, a 1975 graduate of First 
Colonial High School. "I always knew diat 
public safely was die job I wanted to do. I 
often thought law enforcement was going to 
be die way I went; I uied it. but It didn't suit 
me as well as the fire/rescue services. I 
found very early on diat it came naturally to 
me." 

He jumped right into die instruction sectOT 
shortly after he got his initial training 
because he felt he hadn't learned the 
material well enough. Determined to excel, 
"it f(Ht^ me and encouraged me to become 
extremely proficient in die skills required. 

To say "it's taken off from there," as 
Glover puts it, would be an understatement. 
During his 21 years as an emergency 
medical technician instructor, he has 
garnered numerous accolades and 
achievements. In the meantime, he has 
pursued his passion for teaching and public 
speaking to die fullest 

"TTie bigger die crowd, the better," he 
smiled from his office at die Virginia Beach 
Fire Training Center. 

Years ago, a colleague told Glover that he 
doubted his ability to speak at a seminar. 
His hopes dashed, that only made Glover 
determined to succeed. Today he is 
considered an expert in his field — often 
addressing national audiences. Until a few 
years ago, his speeches focused on 
emergency medical services and patient 
care topics; recently, he has become 
interested in public safety management and 
disaster management 

"It's become a rising topic. Of course, all 
businesses and CHganizations need diat type 
of informatioi," he observed. 

Getting behind the podium also allows 
Glover to indulge anotho' love: interaction 
widi people. 

"The most motivating and inspirational 
part of my job is to take new recruits and 
existing experienced people and be able to 
make a difference — being able to help 
them to improve. It's really rewarding to 
train a group of basic recruits or new EMS 
personnel and see them perform well, and 
then to see them advance in their career. At 
one point I could honesdy say diat I trained 
almo^ ev»y EMT in die city of Virginia 
Beach." 

While Glover has served many civic 
organizations, he considers his service to die 
rescue squad and fire department as the 
most fulfilling. 

"These organizations exemplify the 
meaning of professionalism, quality and 
dedicated service to the community," he 
stated, "Professionally, both the Virginia 
Beach Fire Department and the Virginia 
Beach Rescue Squad have served as the 
heart of my passion to serve people and die 
community." 

During his tenure with the rescue squad, 
Glover has twice been the chief executive 
and operational officer (captain). East 
Sector commander and in many other 
operational and administrative posts. He is 
also a charter member of the planning 
committee for Taskforce 2000. 

With the fire department he serves as a 
member of the Tidewater Regional Fire 
Academy Training Committee, ex-officio 
member of die regional Mobile Intensive 
Care canmittee and as an active member of 
die Governor's Statewide Committee on 
Disa^ Management. 

In sdUitKHi, Glover serv^ as an affiliate 
member of the American College of 
Emergency Technician-Basic Trauma Life 
Suppwt program; affiliate faculty member 
tot tl% Amoican Heart Associttion; member 
of die Tidewater Emergency Medical 
Services Disaster Management sub- 
committee; and, adjunct faculty with 
Tidewater Community College, Hampton 
University and National Fire Academy in 
Emmitsburg, Md. 

As if that weren't enough to keep him 
busy, Glover is ^)on planning u> pursue a 
tkxnwate in Ihiblic Administration or Urban 
Services from an as-yet-undetermined in- 
state university with a target completion 
date between 1998 and 2000. He already 
hol(te an associate's degree in Fire Service 
from TMewit^ Community College, m well 
as a taclwlOT's de^e in Ftre Service 
^bnini^ation frcm l|Mi|Mni Uirtv«fsiiy. He 
also holds a master's degree in Public 
^taiirist^Am frnn Troy Sute University- 
Atfauth; ^^Ni cmpns. 

Ov«r tte yem te has eamd numerous 
honors from hit ^ers and colleagues. 
Amoig diem: C^H^iding Ywng Man of 
Anrntea, Tlw Uni^ Swm layc€«s. 1983; 
Vi^ia Be^h Re^ue Squ^ Member of 
tte YeM-, 1983; a«J. Claw Act Awanls in 
19SS. 1989 and 1995 fron the city of 
Virginia BeKh. TTiis year, as well as 
^rning tl« Oovemo's Award in EMS for 




Outstanding Prehospital Instructor, Glover 
was nominated for the PEER Recognition 
Award by die city and die Governor's Award 
for Excellence in EMS. 

Of his Outstanding Prehospital Instructor 
recognition, Glover is humbled and proud. 

"It's a very overwhelming honor. When 
you speak, people look at you differentiy. 
This was a state recognition and came from 
a panel die governor put together, so it is 
v»y humbling. I'm truly proud to be a part of 
the Virginia Beach Fire Deparunent. I have 
extrane pride in being a member because of 
the peq>le and the service we provide. I'm 
equally proud to be a member of the 
Virginia Beach Rescue Squad. I could not 
have gotten involved in anything more 
meaningful diat impacts folks and makes a 
positive change." 

A resident of Chesapeake's Great Bridge 
section. Glover attends Bethel Baptist 
Church. 

Name: Robert Leon Glover Jr. 

What brought you to this area: 

I'm from a military family, and our last 
duty assignment was to Virginia Beach 
26 years ago. 

Hometown: North Kingston, R.I. 

Birthdate: Aug. 11, 1957. 

Nickname: Rob. I dont care for the 
traditional nicknames associated with 
Robert. 

Occupation: Fire service 
instructor/paramedic and part-time 
college professor. 

Marital Status: I've been married 
for the past 15 years to a perfect 
partner, Donna. 

Children: One son, Bobby, who is a 
senior at Kellam High School. Currently, 
he is active in the school band servir^ 
as the inarohing band drum major. He is 
a gifted musician, talented student and 
a great son and friend. 

FBTorite movies: The choices are 
difficult because I like many movies. 
H^ever, if I must pkH( a few they wouM 
Ifclude "Pure Country," "Same Time 
Ntirt Year." "The Godfather" series and 
thefcrst.few Steven Seagal rrwvies. 

M^azines I regularly read: Tiine. 
World ^ Report. Entrepreneur and 
proftssfons*! journals. 

Favorite authors: John Grisham, 
W.E.B. Griffin, Peter Conroy, Michael 
Crichton, Phillip Margolin and Robert B. 
Parker. 

Favortle n^t out on the town: I 

enj(^ the many cultural festivities offered 
In Trtewater. The Weal evening is to join 
a group of frierWs and faml^ and visK a 
festh/al, enjoying the atnfiosphere, misk: 
and many types of cultural (x^king. 

Favorite restamato: My favorite 
casual restaurant is ^tback Steak 
N(HJse. For a more sun^ious cu^ine, i 
en^jy AWo's. 

Favorite meal: Anythir^ Italian or 
v^iatever is prepared tif my mother-in- 



law, Betty Rowland. 

What most people don't know 
about me: I like to sing. Some of the 
most enjoyable times that I have had in 
my life have been with music and 
singing. 

Best thing about myself: My 

ability to relate and communicate with 
people in general. I enjoy teaching and 
meeting new, motivated people. I feel 
that I make a diffefence with my 
interaction, experience and teaching 
style. It's rewarding to see the people 
you influence and educate do well in 
their lives and careers. 

Worst habit: Procrastination! 

Pets: At this time we don't have any. 
We still miss our family dog of 15 years, 
Coco, who recently succumbed to an 
illness. 

Hobbies: Music, tennis, reading, golf, 
cultural festivities and movies. 

Ideal vacation: For my wife and I to 
find enough time to visit the mountains. 
It would be nice to stay in a small bed 
and breakfast with no schedules, 
interruptions or responsibilities and enjoy 
quality time together. 

Pet peeves: Being late to anything 
really gets my goat. Other items I find 
really annoying are poor manners and 
disrespecting an elder. 

First job: While in junior high schooj, 
I began working in an ARCO gas station 
on the corner of Pacific Avenue and 
17th Street. I continued working there 
throughout high school. The work was 
demanding, but the experiences 
interacting with people and responsibility 
were invaluable. 

Worst Job: Working construction in 
the summer between my junior and 
senfor year in high school. I tied rebar for 
concrete sidewalks ail summer. 

Favorite sports teams: The 

Chteago Bears, football; Chicago Cubs, 
baseball; ODD Monarchs, basketball; 
and. Hampton Roads Admirals, ice 
hockey. 

Favorite musicians: Mariah Carey, 
Hootie and the Blowfish, and Luther 
Vandross. 

I would like my epitaph to read: 

"If you are afraid of being lonely, dont 
try to be right!" (Jules Renard) or "Doing 
what you like is freedom; liking what you 
do is happiness." (unknown). 

If I had 10 minutes on national 
television: I wouU Ike to talk to people 
about the importance of trends and 
family. I would begin by stating that 
being a true friend is one of the hardest 
things a per^n can experience, but a 
responsibility of vital importance. In 
closing, I would publicly thank the many 
people who have help^ me team about 
tove and friendship. Many are the same 
who have inspired and stipported tm 
throughout my personal and 
(MOfessional life. 






I r TTfcii i I T 



■IP>P>V^PIVi 



4 Vaginui ^Kdi Sun. Friday. De<»mb» 1. 1^5 




Celebrate the holidays 
at a Caribbean getaway 



There is stormy weather (and 
more than a little magic) ahead 
in Virginia Snge Company's 
holiday musical, "Once On This 
Island." An rachviting fable with 
a Caribbean beat, "OiKe On lliis 
Island" will (^n Dec. I. 

Written by the team of Lynn 
Ahrens (book and lyrics) and 
Stephen Flaherty (music), "Once 
On This Islwd" is lased on the 
book "My Low, My Love, or The 
Peasant Girl" by Trinidadian 
author Rosa Guy. Set in the 
French Andlles, it is both a story 
and a celebiaiitNi of storytelling, 
of the way the stories we tell 
reflect and define our lives. 

'OtKX On This Island" is the 
tale of two groups of people, dark- 
skinned peasants and mulatto 
aristocrats, who live on one 
island, but in entirely separate 
worlds. Exuberant and deeply 
touching, the play tells the srary 
of TiMoune, a peasant girl, and 
Daniel, the rich city boy wfa(»e 
life she saves. 

Far from being a simple love 
story, "Once On This Island" is 
about barriers that exist betwera 
pet^le ^d about dw power of Ae 
human spirit to overcome Uiose 
l»rriers. Filled widi die colors and 
textures of the tropics, it is a 
visual feast. Every dement of the 
production contributes to a 
magical aunt on stage. The music 
and dancing capture the essmce 
of the indigenous island culhue. 

The colorful, handcrafted 
costumes designed by Howard 
Tsvi Kaplan transform actors into 
birds and trees. Leonani Harman's 
set has die lushiwss of a trq)ical 
forest and the breaditaking beauty 
of m island sunset. 

"Once On This Island" is 
directed by Gerry Mclntyre, a 
member of the (viginal Bn^dway 
cast and the dance captain of 
b(Mh die Br(»idway poduction and 
the nati(»al tour. A residntt of 
Los Angeles, Mclntyre has 
assembled a strong company and 
it looking forward to the VSC 
production. ''Woridng on this show 
is a magical experience. It is 
uplifting; it makes you soar. This 
play touches peqde a their core," 
(aid Mclntyre. 

The cast of "Once On This 
Island" comes to the VSC 
production with impressive 
experioice. Vuiita Hvboiv plays 
TiKfouiK, a role she perform«i in 
the Broadway prodiutim and die 
national tour. Most recently 
Harbour appeared in 
"Noffiathemba" at Steppenwolf 
Theatre in Chicago. 

Daniel, TiMoune's love, is 
played by Iannis Stowe who 
comet to VSC directly from the 
ni^(»al tour of "S. Guys Named 
Moe," Prior to dwt he performed 
in die Eim^ean torn of "My One 
and Only" starring Jodi Benson 



First Baptist will 
present a holiday 
show to remember 

Coming to the beaniifttl 
reAiiMriwd iterisM (^>Mi House 
Dec. 8 - 10 one of HuipKm 
Roads most loved hoU4iy 
traditions. 'It's Christmas 
CtkkaHoB 1995" u ^^emi by 
Hiit Bqxist Church of Norfoft's 
300<voice choir and 40-pieee 

This yw's imdiKtion wiU afce 
yw (HI an imaginative ^wnwy 
tbroB|h 24KX) Chrisbnases of 
hoft and changed lives. 

Mon dm 70,000 people have 
MmemeA tfiis jx^lar drmiatic, 
nuriad ptMntatkm over ite tet 
12 y^ ite tkket in£»nmi^Ni, 
caU466-m4. 



nmmsimmmr 



wsM^snmmxi 




%>^al Wnter Rittes 




and danced in the Eur(q)»n tour 
of "Bubblin" Brown Sugar." Dde 
E. Turner and Myra Lucretia 
Taylor play TiMoune's parents. 

The forces of eardi, water, love 
and deadi are depicted in "OiKe 
On This Island" as four strong- 
willed gods who control the 
desdny of the island inhabitants. 
Bringing these vibrant characters 
U) life are Monica Pege, Virginia 
Woodruff, Jim Weaver and John 
Eric Parker. 

Pege comes to VSC from 
Broadway's recent "Smokey Joe's 
Cafe." Woodruff, a vcterjui of die 
national tour of "Once On This 
Island," most recenUy completed 
a successful run of "Abyssinia" at 
North Shore Musical Theatre. 
Weaver's most recent credits 
include productions of "Ain't 
Misbehavin'" at the Alabama 
Shakespeare Festival and the 
Cleveland Playhouse, Parker just 
cfflnpleted the European tour of 
"Startight ExiHess." 

Hum strong \ocx\ talent will be 
making their VSC debuts in 
"Once On This Island." Michael 
Le Melle has appeared at 
numerous local venues in 
including the Hurrah Players, 
Norfolk Public Schools 
Performing Arts Repertory, and 
Founders Inn Dinner Theatre 
where he received accolades for 
his porformaAce as Jim in "Big 
River." He also appeared in Spike 
Lee's latest movie "Clockers." 
Siacey Russell and Sandy Smidi, 
current members of Norfolk 
Public Schools Performing Arts 
Repertory, complete die cast. 

Music director for "Once On 
This Island" is Kevin Wallace, 
who return to VSC following his 
great success here last year as 
music director for the holiday 
musical, "Peter Pan." Scenic 
Designer Leonard Harman's 
recent desip «^rk has been Men 
at the Cumberland County 
Playhbuse in Crossville, Tenn., 
and Playhouse on die Square in 
M»nphi|. 

Howard Tsni Kaplan (costume 
deagi^') was die former resident 
designer for both. Recent 
endeavors include designs for 
Ringling Brothers Bamum & 
Bailey Clown College, the 
costumes for Tokyo-based theme 
park ftrque Espana, and various 
television projects. VSC 
As»x;iate Artist Kenton Yearger 
rebuns to Virginia Stage company 
for his fourtii season as lighting 
designer for "Once On This 
Island." Sound d^gn is by Erica 
n<«ich. 

"Once On This Isluid" will be 
present a die Wells Theatre, 
which it located a the com» of 
Mmticello Avenue and Tazewell 
StTMt in downtown Norfolk. 




Shipyard Museum site of 
author's premier signing 



COMM^ 

Contemporary glass dazzles 

"Dancing In a Sea of Light," showcasing the work of 23 studio glass 
artists, recently opened at the Vlrgnla Beach Center for the Arts and 
continues through Jan. 7. It is the second exhibition presented from the 
collection of Isaac and Sonia Luski - considered one of the leading art 
collections In North Carolina. Call The VIrgnia Beach Center for the Arts 
at 425-0000 for more Information on this exhibit. 



The Friends of die Portsmoudi 
Naval Shipyud Museum will h(»t 
an open hwse at die museum, 2 
High St., Sunday, Dec. 10 from 2 
- S p.m. for the premier book 
signing of "Bed of Honor" by Alf 
J. Ma^p Jr. 

This historical novel by Mapp 
will iK)t be available for purchase 
at book stores until 1996. The 
principal characters in die book 
are fictional. You will read about 
Portsmouth and Robert E. Lee's 
visit here after die War Betwera 
die States. 

Other prominent visitOTS to die 

area, Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain, 

Booker T. Washington and 

Theodore Roosevelt make 

.auth»itic appearance under dieir 



TIs the Season' for kids' 
concerts In 



Art Briefs 



own names. The author moves 
about the Soudi to New Orleans, 
ad dirouglxMit Vi^inia, as wtU as 
Paris, Rome ai^ Wi^iingum. 

T\» bock has been given rave 
reviews by outstanding authors 
such as Howard Owen, audx>r oi 
"Littlejohn and Fat Lightning; 
George Garrett, author of "D«ith 
of die Fox" and "Hie Wedding 
Cake in dw Middle of die Road;" 
Theo(tore Taylor, audior of "The 
Stalker;" Josephine Jacobsen, a 
sbc-time winna of die O. Henry 
Award for Short Stories; and, 
Henry Taylor, Pulitzer Prize 
winning author of 'The Flying 
change." 

A limited number of books will 
be available for singing. 

qien to die public. 

Pot additicmal information, call 
die NSU Music Dei»rtment at 
683-8544. 



The Virginia Symphony, in 
collaboration with the Virginia 
Children's Chorus, performs its 
second Peanut Butter and Jam 
Fmnily Series concert, "Tis The 
Sea«}n," on Dec. 2 at 2:30 p.m. at 
Harrison Opera House. Russell 
Vinick will guest conduct die 
Virginia Symphony, and Carol 
Thomas Downing will direct die 
choir. 

"Tis The Season" will include 
such holiday muac as Andoscm's 
'Sleigh Ride," Tchaikovsky's 
"Trepak from Nutcracker" and 
"Waltz of die Snowflakes." In 
addition, there will be a 
Christmas Pops Singalong and a 
nanation of Holcombe's "Twas 
die Night Befwe Christinas." 

There will be special 
preconcert activities for bodi 
parentis and children, including 
refreshments and pasta art 
entertainment provided by the 
OHve Owtoi Restauttit. 

Ticket prices for "Tis TTie 
Season" are $8 for phildren and 
$11 for adults, and may be 
purchaMd by calling die Virginia 
Symphony Ticket Sum, located 
in die Plaza One Building, SSO 
East Main St., Suite 505, Ncffolk, 
at 623-2310. at any Tidewater 
bnuich of I^t Vii|^ Bmk, or 
by calling TicketMaster ijt 671- 
8100. 

Hw Viiginia Children's Qxxva 
was foon^ in 1992 by Qlrectttf 
Carol Thomas Downing to provide 
a comprehensive vocal training 
for young p«)ple ages 6 to 16. 
Children from die oitire Hampton 
Roads region ^Uier wealdy to 
study and perform die world's 
finest choral literature. In 1992, 



A Real Steal 



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die VCC made its debut widi die 
Virginia Symphony and regulariy 
perframs in its Pops concots. 

The Dollar Tree Stores Inc. 
present this Peanut Butter and 
Jam Family Series concert. 
Anodier sponsor of die event is 
die Olive Garden Restaurant. 

Chanukah concert 
planned at Beach 

"Twinklos To SizzlMS...Suzuld 
Violin" will present iu 22nd 
Christinas Chaaubdi Celebntim 
Suitfday, Dec. 2 at Thalia Lynn 
Baptist church in Virginia Beach. 
The «)nMrt will be foUowed by 
refi«shfflentt widi die pttfamen. 

Twinkters to Sizzlers..., a 
private Suzuki violin program 
located in Chesapeake, draws 
students from throughout the 
Hampton Roads area as well as 
North Carolina. Its director, 
SuzanoQ Schreck, is a graduate of 
die Easunen School of Music of 
die University of Rochester, and a 
candidate for die Master of Music 
from Virginia Commonwealtii 
University. 

Children of all ages, and dieir 
parents, are invited to join die 
performers in welcoming the 
approaching holiday season. For 
more information, call 420-6687. 



I^. Carl G. Hairis, head of die 
Norfolk State University Music 
Department and director of die 
NSU Concert Choir, has 
announced that the choir will 
present its annual Christmas 
concert Sunday, Dec. 3 at Grace 
Episcopal Church. 1400 East 
Brambleton Ave. in Ncvfolk. 

Tito concot, featuring Harris as 
die conducted and Dr. Ernest J. 
Brown as accompanist, is 
scheduted for 6 p.m. It is free and 



The featured show at die Olde 
Towne Gallery for die mondi of 
DecembN is sponsored by die 
Ceramic Designers Association. 
Tidewater's finest potters guild 
will be putting on a Christmas 
show at dM Old Tomw Oalloy. a 
nctptiaa will be held on Sunday, 
Dec. 3 from 2 - 5 p.m. The ^w is 
open to die public and extends 
thnm^ Dec. 31. 



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Virginia Beach Sun. Friday. December 1. 1995 5 



Education 



Plaza students immerse themselves in books 



These students 
don't just read; 
they comprehend 

By MARGARET WINDLEY 
Sun CorrMpondant 

Educators will tell you that 
reading with comprehension is the 
key to learning, and at the same 
time that all too many students 
dislike reading. Therefore, 
anything you can do to encourage 
reading with with comprehenaon 
should be to the good. 

So like many other schools 
these days Raza Middle School 
has initiated a half-hour period on 
Friday mornings during homeroom 
in which almost everyone is 
required to read. 

And that "everyone" does not 
just aaan students. 

"From 8 to 8:30 a.m. every 
Friday, die whole school reads," 
said Jeannie Crocker, 
communications ^ills teacher. 

That means the entire teaching 
staff, school administration and 
even visitors. 

"Parents are handed reading 
material when they enter during 
that time." she added. 

Jill Garrison, a Home 
Economics, Study Skills and 
Teen Living teacher at Plaza, 
remarked, *Uas of teiK;hers pull a 
chair out in the hall during that 
time to read." 

The only exception to the 
Friday morning reading period is 
"one secretary who needs to be 
available to answer the phones, 
Crocker noted. "We are even 
w(»king on the custodians." 

But as innovative as that 
sounds, the 30-minute reading 
concept is not at all unusual. In 
fact, Crocker added, "That is 
done in a lot of elementary 
schools." 

Of course, n(Hhing is achieved 
if the students, whose noses seem 
glued to the air in front of their 
books, are really nan>ing or just 
perusing the material without 
tfyitfg to mnderstand #hAt they are 
loddng at 

"Reading with comprehension 
is the most important part," 
Garrison said. 

So that's where Plaza's Junior 




rlNMI Of MWOVM fVVIQWy 

DROP EVERYIHMfi AND READ! Practically everyone it Han MM4le 
tchMl, fram fiicilty to ttidcnti, takes 30 minotet o« Fridays to 
Nidilie hi i good be^ 

— — ■■^— —*— ~— "g differently from most traditional 

literature courses. Instead of 
having distinct answers to distinct 
questions, participating in Junior 
Great Books programs are graded 
on responses to essay-style 
questions in which any reasonable 
answer can be accepted as long 
as the student is able to back it 
up with quotes from the story, 
thus incidentally proving a 
comprehension of the story. 

The only way a student can get 
an answer wrong is not to answer 
it or to answer it incompletely. 

This still leaves plenty of room 
for student evaluations. 

"They are graded on 
participation and a lot of writing 
assignments. The writing is 
thoughtful writing," said Crocker, 
explaining that the way the 
students answer the questions 
shows that they have read and 
mastered the material. 

"I also check for organizational 
skills in their notebooks since it's 
under study skills," said Garrison. 
"It's how well they address a 
question." 

"It gets kids at every reading 
level," she added. "During the 
shared inquiry their ideas are very 



But as innovative 

as that sounds, 

the 30-minute 

reading concept 

is not at all 

unusual. 



Great Books Program comes in, a 
program to encourage reading 
with comprehension which is 
carried at 10 a.m. every day plus 
all day on Friday in English- 
related classes by teachers with 
special training in Junior Great 
Books. 

Both Crocker and Garrison are 
among those with the special 
instruction and are enthusiastic 
about the series — Crocker 
covering it in her Communication 
Skills Classes. 

Crocker explained that the 
special training is necessary 
because the stories are taught 



on-task. I have learned to be a 
betttr prompter. I sit back and 
question rather than give my 
opinion." 

Lisa Cullen, a student, 
explained what she liked about 
the series. 

"If you don't understand 
something about a story, we can 
ask, and we can share what we 
think about it. In oiher classes we 
just read it, and they don't ask." 

Shawan Bolden, another 
student, was also pteased by the 
openness to other qnnions. 

■^We never have a wrong 
answer," be smiled. 

Even Tamara DeLoach 
remaiked, "In some of our classes 
we don't get to talk about the 
books." 

Daniel Birdwell considered the 
small size of the class to be an 
important plus as he pointed out 
that this meant that he had a 
chance to give an opmoa. 

Junior Great Bodes classes do 
tend to be small, giving more 
opportunity for the students to 
speak out. 

"The groups are small enough 
that you really can do that," said 
Crocks. "There are IS students in 
my first period class. Some of 
them are larger, IS to 23 (v 2S." 
She added that with larger 
classes, such as with 30 or more, 
a few will tend to dominate the 
discussion. 




Coum^ltKito 



Heading home 

Jason Winston George and Angela Selene McCloskey head the cast of thtf 
Temple University theaters production of Samm-art Williams' comic (kama 
"Home." The Tony Award-nominated coming-of-age tale is slated for a 
Nov. 30 - Dec. 9 run In Temple's Randall Theater on the main campus. 
George, a native of Virginia Beach, is a student in Temple University's 
School of Communications and Theater in Philadelphia. 



First Colonial thespians hit the 'high road' 



It will be hectic period for 
students, teachers and parents at 
First Colonial High School, where 
normal holiday activities will be 
augmented by extra events — all 
in preparation for an unusual trip 
to Scotland to take place in 
August. 

The need to raise funds has 
come to pass when the First 
Colonial Theatre Ensemble was 
recently chosen to perform as the 
representative from Virginia to 
Edinburgh Fine Arts Festival, said 
to be the most prestigious arts 
festival in the world! 

The next fund raising event for 
the thespians is scheduled for 
Dec. 9 when a Christmas Arts and 
Craft Show will be staged at First 
Colonial High School, from 9 a.m. 



-7 p.m. 

Rrst Colonial won the right lo 
be part of the summer event when 
it was chosen by the American 
High School Theatre Festival, a 
group established for the 
recognition of extraordinary high 
school theater programs 
nationally. Ten high schools, with 
nor more than one representative 
per state, are chosen annually lo 
receive this recognition to take 
part of in the Edinburgh Festival. 

The August trip will take 
students through a two-day 
educational experience in 
London, including a visit to the 
newly restored Globe Theatre and 
a performance in London's East 
End. 

The First Colonial group will be 



producing Susan Zeder's award- 
winning play Mother Hicks for the 
Festival, which itself includes 
student and professional 
productions, college and aspiring 
Off-Broadway troupes who all told 
produce hundreds of performances 
daily. 

The American High School 
Theatre Festival provides air and 
ground transportation, tours, 
housing, selected meals, security 
and tickets to several main events 
and all AHSTF performances. The 
cost for each student is 
approximately $3,200. 

Those wanting to assist the 
Theatre Ensemble are asked to 
call Nancy Curtis at 496-6858, 
ext. 3126. 




Computers become playground for desktop forgery 

. . . ■ _......._. ........ .. ■,..._ r„,;:„T: nff..r fnr«red receiots when forgers job easier, it is still haider Usually the company that sells o, 



In the past decade, computers 
have become an integral part of 
most business operations. Using 
the technology of desktop 



publishing, which allows 
businesses to prepare 
professional-looking documents 
on inexpensive personal 



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computers, desktop forgers are 
able to duplicate many kinds of 
documents. 

Using relatively inexpensive 
and widely available equipment, 
a forger can cheaply and easily 
duplicate passports, birth 
certificates, stock certificates, 
purchase orders, cash and credit 
card receipts, bank checks and a 
wide range of other papers, all 
bearing the official logo or 
emblems of the original 
documents. Bills can be paid with 
bogus checks, shoplifters can 



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offer forged receipts when 
returning stolen merchandise for 
refund and con artists can use 
forged identification to open 
credit, charge cards or bank 
accounts. 

The Better Business Bureau 
suggests the following tips for 
businesses to help stop desktop 
forgers. 

Use difficult to replicate 
emblems or other devices on 
company documents. 

Use color on important 
documents. Although the new 
color copiers are making the 



forger's job easier, it is still haider 
to reproduce color than black and 
white. 

Order nonstandard paper for 
your printing needs. 
Anticounterfeiting aids include 
specially treated paper that 
displays the word "VOID" when 
tampered with. 

Consider using protective 
devices on your computer, such 
as security software that uses 
passwords to control access to 
information contained in a hard 
disk or antivirus devices designed 
to combat computer viruses. 



Hampton Roads on the Move Deadlines: 

News deadline is Wolnesdays at noon for publication in the next week's 
newspapers. Advertising deadUne is Tuesday at 2 p.m. for publication in th« 
week's issues. This sedion e published every Friday m The Virginia Beatii 
Sun, The Chesepe^e Pos/and ThePoitsmoUih Times. Send ^1 materiafe. 
including name and teleplwne ntmiberto: 
Hampton Roadsw the Movt, c/o The Chesapeike Post,1024 N. 
Battlefield Bh^d., Chesap^ike, Va. 23320, or fax » 54M390. 




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Usually the company that sells or 
leases your computer equipment 
can explain how passwords, 
security codes and code- 
scrambling devices can help to 
conu-ol access to your system. 

A company's most effective 
protection against computer 
crimes should begin with a 
willingness to investigate any and 
all questionable activities. If a 
company investigation turn up the 
appearance of possible criminal 
activity, the company's attorney, 
local police department and local 
district attorney should be notified 
immediately. 



Properties are sold on 
the auctioneer's blocic 



The total reached after the 
recent auction of six 
commercial/industrial properties 
in Chesapeake. Portsmouth and 
Newport News was $1,337,500. 
The propoties which »«re sold by 
Virginia Beach based auctioneers 



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Fox & Associates included a 
20,000 square-foot office 
warehouse located in the 
Greenbrier Park in Chesapeake, 
which had investors lining up to 
register for the bidding. This sold 
for nearly $600,000. 

Interest was focused on the 
{Ht}perues which were being sold 
"Absolute" to the highest bidder. 
Fox offered four on this basis 
iiKluding ihc 30,000 square-foot 
Lake Ahoy shopping center, built 
in 1988, which brought out the 
targain-hunteis. 

Some were disappointed at the 
withdrawal £rom the auction of 
the 75 single-family buikling lots 
located in southside Meadows, 
tl» high growth area of Greenfield 
CreK»nt, Suffolk, just off Route 

Fox announced that this sale 
will now be held on sm on 
Friday. Dec. 8 at 12:30 p.m. and 
will ala> be offcrwl "Abstrfuw." 

Tte propmy is to be sold as a 
whole. For more (tetails, call Fox 
& Associaies at 428-8200. 



tm 



6 Viqtinia Beach Sim. Friday. t>ecember 1. 1995 



Parks and Recreatiohn plans Trashmore renovations, lake revival 



By LEE CAHILL 
Cl^ Council Reporter 

The Virginia Beach ?aAs and 
Recreation Department has re- 
commended a $1,653,000 reno- 
vations project for Lake Trash- 
more for inclusion in the city's 
1996-97/2001-02 Parks and Re- 
creation Capital Improvement 
Plan. 

A large part of the expenditure 
($488,000) has been allocated for 
measures to improve the water 
quality in the park's 55-acre lake, 
which has been closed for re- 
creational activities since 1991 
because of high levels of bacteria 
in the water. 

A report presented at a Virginia 
Beach City Council work session 
Tuesday by Smith Demer Nor- 
mann, consultants hired by the 
Public Works Department, con- 
firmed that the fecal coliforms 
bacteria exceeds water quality 
stmdards of 200 l»K:teria per 100 
millilitres (ml) of water. For two 
or more samples over a 30-day 
period, or a fecal coliform bac- 
teria level of 1,000 per 100 ml. at 
any time. 

The contamination of the 
water, Ved P. Malhoira, engineer 
with Smith Demer Normann, told 
council, comes from mixed sour- 
ces, both human waste (fecal 
coliffflm) and animal waste (fecal 
streptococcus). 

However, he said, during cer- 
tain periods of the year, during 
the dry spell this summer when 
there was little run-off into the 
lake, and in the winter the levels 
are within acceptable limits. 

If the city wanted to, it could 
use the water for recreational pur- 
poses during those periods and 
close it at other times. 

Users of Mount Tradimore, the 
city's most used park with over 
800.000 visitors during 1995, and 
the city have wanted to restore 
recreational activities — boating 
and fishing — to the lake since 
the shut-down in 1991. 

Earlio- reports put the blame for 
the pollution on the proliferation 
of ducks and geese on die lake, 
attracted by the food offered by 
bird-loving park-goers. But the 
Mount Trashmore Water Quality 
Sampling report finds both human 
and animals waste conuibuting to 
the high bacteria count 

As a result, the staff is trying to 
find out where the pollution is 
coming from — old sewer lines 
which may be emptying into the 
lake and abandraied septic tanks 
— and has recommended con- 
trolling the source of contami- 
nation rather than treating the 
water itself which would be a)st- 

ly. 

Costs for such treatments as 
ultraviolet irradiation and chlori- 
natitm/dechlorination would cost 
as much as $300,000 a year, <m 
continuing expense. 

The fccommcnded $488,000 for 



improving the lake would be con- 
centrated m redirecting the runoff 
from the shoreline away ffom the 
lake, construct best management 
practices (biofiltration swales and 
water quality inlets); stabilizing 
the shweline with vegetation and 
wetlands; installing a turbidity 
curtain, and installing aerators. 

Other improvements for the 
park recommended in the Parks 
and Recreation report presented 
at the Tuesday workshop include. 
Additional wetlands, planting and 
bank stabilization $435,000; per- 
manent stage and entertainment 
area $80,000; d-ees $60,000; new 
and renovation of facilities 
(restrooms — funding is avail- 
able, trails, signs, overlooks, 
relocation of entrances and park- 
ing improvement) $480,000, and 
the removal of the soap box derby 
track and relocation of skate 
board ramps, $100,(XX}. 

Gary Frankenfield, Parks and 
Recreation plani^r, said that the 
department supports the natural 
approach for improving the 
quality of the lake water. He said 
to prevent erosion of the banks, 
the environment should be de- 
signed to keep people away from 
the edge and specific areas where 
people can come close to the 
water should be defined. 

He said that an educational 
interpretative program is needed 
— signs should not just say "No, 
no, no," he said, but he should 
explain to people why they arc 
not permitted to use tbe lake and 
what they can do to help. 

He said that Trashmore has the 
potential of being one the best 
examples of reclamation through 
a natural and environmental ap- 
pnach. 



He recommended develt^mg 
no-mow areas and nature buffi^s 
and natural wetlands areas with 
appropriate environmental buffers. 
Parks and RecreatitH) would like 
to install a tree nurs^ to {Hovide 
trees for the paric which will en- 
tail a minimal cost for a long- 
term benefit 

Malhotra said the water quality 
study, which monitored the water 

from July 1994 to July 1995 — 
192 samples from eight locations 
uncovered no conclusive source 
for pollution. 

City Manager James K. Spore 
added that the city nee^d to see 
whether illegal sewer systems are 
coming into the lake. 

Councilman Louis R. Jones 
noted that an old community used 
to be located near the park, and 
some of its old septic tanks may 
be leaking into the lake. 

Ultimately, said Councilman 
John A. Baum. the cost may be 
too prohibitive to have the area as 
a recreation area as well as a 
storm water disposal area. 

Malhotra said that the lake is 
operating as a pollution retention 
classic, protecting downstream 
water by retaining pollutants. 

Councilman Robert K. Dean 
said that the lake has been used 
as a recreational area for so many 
years and wondered why other 
lakes in the city which may have 
just as high levels of bacteria 
have not been closed down. 

"Why we picked on Mt. 
Trashmore is beyond me." He 
wanted to know what the city 
would have to do to restore the 
lake for recreation with limited 
body contract 

City Engineer John Herzke said 
that the majority of the other 
lakes in the city are private lakes 



Fire station opens door to 
public for train exhibition 



Kids of all ages love trains, fire 
engines and holiday decoration! 

Once again. Virginia Beach 
Fire Station 10/23. located in the 
Woodstock area, S6S6 Providence 
Rd., has planned an enjoyable 
holiday evening fag our citizens. It 
encourages everyone to visit 
Station 10/23 and see the 
volunteer effort by the Virginia 
Beach Fffefightra^. the Big Train 
Operators Club and Greenbrier 
Rorist 

This year it's bigger and better. 
Inside the bay area of the station, 
an 18-by-45-foot area will have 
three levels or raised platforms 
built from scratch by area 
collectors, with "G" scale trains 
produced by LGB, Aristocraft and 
Bachman. The layout, partially 
donated by the Big Train 
Operators Club, has 12 active 
tracks with lots of buildings and 



scenery, many built by the 
firefighters, to mate a complete 
town. 

The dates and times for the 
Christmas Train Show are 
Sunday, Dec. 10 from 4 - 9 p.m.; 
and, Monday, Dec. 11 through 
S?turday, Dec. 16 from 6 ■ 9 p.m. 
On Sunday, the Virginia Beach 
Monster Fife Truck will make a 
appearance and on all evenings 
WAGS, the Fire Dog, will be 
there to teach our children fire 
safety. 

Each night, children 12 and 
under may register for a free 
remote control fire engine 
donated by the Virginia Beach 
Professional Firefighters, Local 
#2924. Also for the children, 
Aristocraft Train Com{»ny has 
donated a "G" Gauge Christmas 
Train Set which will be given 
away on the la^ night 



althoagh \» agreed that most will 
have the same pollutants. The 
reason that Lake Trashmtne was 
monitored is that it is a public 
lake. 

He said that the city "can't say 
that on such and such a date 
(Lake Trashmore) will be open to 
the public." 

Dean said he would like to see 
the lake opened up. He said that 
there are still people who fish 
there. He suggested that the lake 
be opened and monitored and 
clo»d when necessary. He point- 
ed out that the city is not en- 
forcing the health safety issue 
city wide. 

If the situation is as bad as 



the report indicates, he said, the 
lake should be posted and the 
feeding of ducks should be pro- 
hibited. 

Herzke said that tl^ city has 
already stopped selling food to 
feed the birds, but otherwise the 
feeding is hard to control. 

Dean said that he would also 
like to see activities such as a 
wind-surfing on the lake. 

Frank Scanlon, environmental 
health manager with the Health 
Department, said that he would 
not recommend that because of 
the potential for disease if people 
come in contact with the water. 

Parks and Recreation Dir«;tor 
Susan Walston, said that Ashing 
would be more tolerable because 



the fish that are caught are 
cooked, but with windsurfing 

Parks and Recreation is still 
looking to volunteers to help with 
the latest improvements. The 
report says thtt various businesses 
and community groups have 
expressed interest in donating 
materials and volunt^r efforts to 
improve Mount Tr^hmoe. 

The report also says that a 
portion of the water quality im- 
provements could come from 
storm water related proju;ts, and 
that grants through various en- 
vironmentally-related and educa- 
tional programs may be available. 



'Holiday Lights' come to boardwalk 



a Conthiwd On Pag* 1 

are closed to pedestrians during 
the light show. People are, 
however, allowed on the beach 
itself at access points on 13th, 
20th and 27th streets. 

"Being the first year, none of us 
knew what we had to do to make 
this happen," said Jackson. "It's 
been a combination of people 
working together to make this 

happen. We've had many 
meetings, for traffic for example, 
to make sure this is going to 
woric" 

A large part of the success of 
the project, Jackson explained, 
has been through volunteers. 

"We have them working along 
the boardwalks so they can help 
the pedestrians, so they can be 
informed," said Jackson. "They 
also help them get down to the 
sand. We can't prevent anyone 
from walking on the sand; we just 
need them to get there safely." 

And even Santa Claus won't 
miss this event He will be 
making- appearances at the Life- 
Saving Museum of Virginia on 
24th Street 

The display will be closed on 
Christmas Eve. On New Year's 
Eve, the boardwalk will close to 
drivers, but will be open to 
pedestrians free of charge. 

Jackson said the holiday lights 
at the oceanfront will become an 
annual event. The displays were 
designed by Carpenter Designs in 
Hickory, N.C., one of the only 
companies of its kind on the East 
Coast 

"All of our displays were 
designed and specifically for 
Virginia Beach to correlate with 
the existing sculptures on the 
boardwalk," she noted. 

Local children also had a hand 
in the decoration of the resort 
strip. 

"We had a contest for the 
children in the schools to do a 
logo for holiday lights," said 
Jackson. "We had a winner and 



five runners up. We made a 
banner of each of the six winners 
between 25th and 24th streets. 
This all will be a continuing 
thing, so that each year, we will 
add on the new logos." 

Jackson said the idea is to add 
to the decorations and displays 
every year, making each one 
bigger and better than the last 

"Our vision is to drive over the 
bridge, coming onto 21st Street 
and have a city of lights." 

Another vision of Jackson's is to 
have the largest choral gathering 
in 60 years take place during the 
1997 event 

"We're trying to attract the 
largest choral gathering ever 
assembled in the Guinness Book 
of World Records," she said. To 
do so would require 60,000 
people. 

"We want to encourage groups 
from other parts of the area or the 
state to come and be a part of 
Uiis. The last gathering of a large 
proportion was in 1937. 

"Wouldn't it be impressive to 
see 60,000 coming down 21st 
Street to 24th Street singing? 



That would be something!" 

Jackson said it would be 
possible to accomplish in two 
years — or even next year, if the 
people would come — by 
coordinating it with the Sugar 
Plum Bakery, which has a choral 
gathering each year during the 
Sugar Plum Gingerbread Festival 
each year. 

But that's in the future. 

For now, Jackson is just trying 
to make it dirough this season, 
and she seems pleased with the 
turnout of the project 

"We did it for our kids and the 
children - just to see their faces 
light up," said Jackson. 

Holiday Lights at the Beach will 
run through Jan. 7 from 5 - 10 p.m., 
Sunday through Thursday; and 5 - 
U p.m. Friday and Saturday. 

The entrance is at 8th Street and 
Atlantic Avenue, where patrons 
must enter from the south. The cost 
is $7 per vehicle, cash only. 
Vehicles larger than a IS- 
passenger van are prohibited. 

For more irtformation, call the 
Virginia Beach Hotel Motel 
Association at 428-S015. 




FEtnVAL OF U6II1S. TlM VlrfNiia Beach •ecmfrail it 4tcM Ml 
wnh bttwM* 250,000 to 300,000 Ufbtt with i 
fram tth U 33r4 ttmH$. 



mMIciI tfwim 



Upcobong 
Events 



Recreation 



Great Neck Community 
Recreation Center invites you to 
their annual Christmas Tree 
Lighting Celebration. The 
festivities will begin at 1 p.m. on 
Sunday, Dec. 10. The afternoon 
will be filled with musical 
entertainment. Wappadoodle 
Puppets, light refreshments, a 
special visit from Santa and the 
lighting of tite tree. 

This event is ^}onsored by the 
Virginia Beach Department of 
Parks and Recreation and Great 
Neck Community Recreation 
Center (located at 2521 
Shorehaven Dr., adj^ent to Cox 
High School). 



Boys ffltd girls ages 6 to 17 are 
invito! to {Mitkipate in the Fifth 
Annual Great Neck Youth 
Basketball Toumamenu. Great 
Neck Community Recreation 
Center will host the girls 
t(Mimament on Saturday, Dec. 9 
from 9 ajn. - 5 p.m. and Sunday, 
Dec. 10 from 1 1 a.m. - 5 p.m. The 
boys tournament will begin on 
Saturday, Dec. 16 and continue 
through Sunday, D«;. 17 (same 
stm and su^ times as above). 

These tournaments provide 
competitive youth tasketbail for 
aU Hampton Rmds boys and girls 
wganized teams. This event is 
sponsor by the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and 
Recreation/ Great Neck 
Cwnnunity Recreation Center 
OoaM m 2521 Shcvehaven Dr. 
ia^smt » 0)x High Schod). To 
registo' Md fOT ta^m inComadM 
caU. (km f^A Athleu» m 4%- 
6766. 



Nosh Cafe, a coffee house 
meeting place for Jewish singles, 
will be held Sunday, Dec. 3 and 
17 from 7 - 10 p.m. at Kempsville 
Conservative Synagogue on 
Indian River Boulevard in 
Virginia Beach. Information 
contact is Lonnie or Herman 
McLeod, 424-5170. 



The Back Bay National 
Wildlife Refuge's pu^viously 
cancelled Discovery Hike for 
Nov. 19 is now being offered on 
Saturday, Dec. 3 from 2 - 3:30 
p.m. The walk will be conducted 
by the Student Conservation 
Association's resource assistant, 
Kate Crowell. The walk will be 
more of a sut>ll, so as not to miss 
any interesting discoveries. 
General refuge information and 
the flora and fauna ecosystems 
will be interpreted. 

Wear appropriate shoes and 
clothes. Pre-registration is 
required and can be made by 
calling the refuge at 721-2412, 
Monday through Friday, from 8 
a.m. - 4 p.m. 



Education 



On Friday, Dec. 8 tt 9:30 a.m., 
weatherman Jon Cash will be 
visiting the first graders of 
Arrowi^ad Elementary School of 
Virginia B«H:h. Tlte first gra(fers 
have hm studying aboit weatlter, 
rain and cIotMls. Cash ^votes a 
lot of his time visiting the area's 
schools promoting an intereA in 
mettwolc^y. TTie children find his 
talks informative and stimulating. 



The Virginia Beach Branch of 
the American Association of 
UniversiQr Woi^ unll ^onmx a 
performance of the comedy- 
musical "Steppin' Out' at the 
Uttte Hitler st Viipnia Beach 
m T^utivf, Dec. 7 at 7:30 p.m. 

Ticl^ are $12.30 ^h ami 
inctwto a wi^ u4 cheeks 



reception at intermission. All 
proceeds will go to the AAUW 
Educational Foundation, a 
national organization which 
sponsors research projects and 
scholarships for «lvanced studies. 
Call 427-5248 fa- reservations. 



The third graders at 
Thoroughgood Elementary School 
will have an Indian Day on Dec. 
1. They will be studying five 
maj(M' Indian grou{». The students 
and teachers will be dressed up as 
Indies. Each cla^rocmi will host 
a different activity. The activities 
will include: Storytelling, 
Thunderbird Sand Art, Indian 
Games, N^klace Making and 
Indian Headbands. The students 
will rotate through all activities 
until they have completed each 
one. 



Clubs 



LynnhavCT AARP Chapter 4654 
will m^t at 11:30 a.m. on 
Wednesday. Dm. 6 for a holiday 
luncheon and installation of 
offu:ers. Monbers and their gite^ 
will assemble at Broad Bay 
ONintryChib. 



The Lfaikhom Paric GaidenClub 
will entoiain at a tea cm Dee. 8 
at die home (tf Mr. and Mrs. Ray 
Bratten. 60S Linkhom Dr., 
Virginia Beach, from 3 - 5 p.m. 
Flower arrangenenU ^and 
decoi^tions will h6 m^e by 
members of the Linkhom ftrt 
Gatden club and wiU be graded 
bymtMtjf^u. 

Fwm 5 - 6 p.m. tite husiamis of 
the members of the club wiU be 
invited for eggm^ mA to view the 
arrangements and decorations 
made by the l»lwk 



Mcmday, Dec. 18 at 6:30 p.m. in 
the Health Education Center, 
located :u:ross fit)m tlte tospital's 
Emergency Center. 

This free service for cancer 
patients and tteir families offers 
both educational and emotional 
suppwt The support group meets 
on the third Monday of every 
month. Foi mott inftmnation, call 
496«30. 



Miscellaneous 



The Life-Saving Museum of 
Virginia, the old Coast Guard 
Statitxi at 24th ami Atlantic, will 
have its annual Holiday Open 
House and Gift Shop Sale on 
Sumtay, Dec. 3 from noon - 5 p.m. 
Featured will be "Maritime 
Minis," small works of art by 
Tidewater artists. 

Paintings of local scenes by 
artists Steve Harrington md Joe 
Frizzell will also be available 
Refreshments will be served. 
Sana Claus will be at the 
mus«un between 1 - 3:30 p.m. 
Parking is available in the 
municipal lot at 25th Stre^ ami 
I^ific Avenue. 



Legals 



Virginia Betch General 
Ho^ital wiU l^d • C&imu 
Sapport Orooy ■^Uag m 



The first aimual Santa Claus 
Shuffle, a SK ran and one-mile 
fun walk/run, will take place 
Saturday, Dec. 9 at Norfolk 
Botanical Gardens. Day of 
registration will be teld from 7:30 
- 8:30 a.m. Fees are $12 if 
received by Dec. I., $10 per 
person for families of three or 
mote; and. $15 on the day of the 
race. 

Pro<^ds from the Santa Claus 
Shuffle will benefit Uie Regional 
Group Home and Crisis 
Intervention Home located in 
Viif^ Beach. 

RegistratiMi may be ^nt to 
Regional Group Home, 2000 
Virginia BeKh Blvd., Virginia 
BeKh, Va., 23454. For more 
infwmatkm, otU l^mm Mullins 
M 422-50^. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



J 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Wednesday, Decem- 
ber 13, 1995 at 12:00 Noon in the 
Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Princess Anne 
Courthouse, Virginia Beach, Vir- 
pnia. A briefmg session will be 
held at 9:00 ajn. in tte City Man- 
ager's Conference Room, City 
Hall Building. PLANNING COM- 
KflSSION ACTION IS NOT A 
HNAL DETERMINATION OF 
THE APH.ICATION, BUT ONLY 
A RECOMMENDATION TO JH^ 
CITY COUNCIL AS THE VIEW- 
roiNT OF THE PLANNING 
a)MMISSION. FINAL DETER- 
MINATION OF THE APPLICA- 
TKW IS TO BE MADE BY OTY 
COUNCIL AT A LATER DATE, 
AFTER PUBLIC NOTICE IN A 
NEWSPAPER HAVING GENE- 
RAL CIRCULATION WITHIN 
THE CITY. 

THOSE MEMBERS OF 
THE PUBLIC INTERESTED 
IN ATTENDING THE PUBUC 
HEARING SHOULD BE AD- 
VISED THAT, FOR REASONS 
THE PLANNING COMMIS- 
SION DEEMS APPROPRUTE, 
CERTAIN ITEMS ON THE 
AGENDA MAY BE HEARD 
OUT OF ORDER AND THAT 
IT SHOULD NOT BE AS- 
SUMED THAT THE ORDER 
LISTED BELOW WILL BE 
EXACTLY FOLLOWED DUR- 
ING THE PUBLIC HEARING. 

The Aaff revttws ct tarn « aU 
of die items on this agenda 
Mg^ ttatf omuin MmdMms te 
attached to approval by City 
QMiMtt. Itoimw. it dioald not 
be MRumed ifatt tto^ ccmdiuons 
MNHdtiite all the «Hidtti(Nis thtt 



will ultimately be attached to the 
project. Staff agencies may 
impose further conditions and 
requirements during 

administration of applicable city 
ordinance. 

SUBDIVISION VARTANrKi 
1. 

Appeal from Decisions of 
Admini^rative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the Sub- 
division Ordinance, Subdivision 
for Michael & Patricia Nelson. 
Property is located at 2741 West 
Lamiing Roal. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGR 

2 

Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the Sub- 
division Ordinance, Subdivision 
for Elvin Ray & Hester L. 
Waterfield. ftoperty is Uxaiei at 
2037 Munden Point Road. PUN- 
GO BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONINn 
DISTRICT rf.A.SSIFirATinN. 

3. 

An Ordinance upon Ai^licati<») 
of Jason B. Cowan for a Change 
of Zoning DisU-ict Cl^sificatitxi 
from A- 18 Apartment Disb-ict to 
R-5S Residential Single Family 
District on certain property lo- 
cated at the northwest inter- 
action of Lincoln Avenue and 
Alabama Avenue. The proposed 
zoning classification to R-5S is 
for single family residential land 
use on tots no less than 5,000 
^nare f€«t The Compretensive 
Plan recommends use of this 
parcel of urban medium low 
itensity resi^ntial at densities 
Ihtt are CMnpatible with use in 
accordance with other Plan 
policies. Said parcel contains 
19,(X)0 square feet, PRINCESS 
AfWEBCmOUGH. 

tentkuMNl On f^a 7 



□ ContkMMd From ftft 7 

4. 

An Ordinance upon Ai^licaiion 
of William Scott Drastal for a 
Change of TUmmg Distmt Clas- 
sification from A- 12 A^irtment 
District to RT-3 Res<« Tourist 
District on Lot 6. Block 52, 
Shadow Lawn Heights. The pro- 
posed zoning classification chan- 
ge to RT-3 is for re»Mt hot^ and 
related mix land uses oicluding 
multifamily residential land use 
at a density no greater than 36 
dwelling units per Kre. TTie Com- 
prehensive Plan recommends use 
of this parcel for suburban high 
density residential at densities 
that are compatible with multi- 
family use in acconlance with 
other Plan poUctM. Said parcel is 
located at 700 Norfolk Avenue 
and cratains 2893 square feet 
more or le«. VIRGINIA BBACH 
BQROUGR 

5. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Joshua Darden. Jr.. for a 
Change of Zoiing District Clas- 
sifkation from A- 12 Apvtment 
District to R-20 Residential Dis- 
trict on the south side of Ame- 
ricus Avenue. 1034 feet we»t of 
Birdneck Road. The proposed 
zoning clasdfication change to R- 
20 is for single family residentiid 
land use on lots no less than 
20,000 square feet. The 
Comprehensive Plan recommends 
use of this parcel for urban 
medium low d«isity residential at 
densities that are compatible with 
multi-family use in accordance 
with other Plan policies. Said 
parcel conuins 21.909 square 
feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
6. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Alex &, 0. Pete Kotarides fot a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from 0-2 Office 
District to B-2 Community 
Business DiArict at the southwest 
corner of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and Fair Meadows 
Road. The proposed zoning 
classification to B-2 is for 
commercial land use. The 
Comprehensive Plan recommends 
use of this parcel for suburban 
medium density residential at 
densities that ue compatible with 
single funily use in accordance 
with othM Plan |x>licies. Said 
property is located on Lots 137, 
138 A 139, Fair Meadows and 
contains 22,498.74 square feet. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

7. 

KGMHKIa uoon amw«h«w 
Of MV^Hfti Beach Inveitmeni 
Company for a Conditional 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from B-2 
Community Business District to 
Conditional A-24 Apartment 
District on the west side of 
College Parte Boulevard, 243 feet 
north of Auburn Drive. The 
proposed zoning classification 
change to A-24 is for multifamily 
land use at a density no greater 
than 24 dwelling uniu per acre. 
The Comprdiensi>« Plan recom- 
mends use of this pvcel for office 
use in accordnce wiUi other Plan 
policies. Said parcel contains 
11.13 acres. KBMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUOE 

8. 

An CMinance upon Application 
of Target (os a ConditiMiia Chan- 
ge of Zoning District Clas- 
sification firwn R-SD Residmdal 
Duplex DiArict to comiitional B-2 
Community Business District at 
the southMst comu of Princess 
Anne Road wd Lynnhaven Paik- 
wty. The {aoposed zming classi- 
fication change to B-2 is for 
gNi^ ctMnmocial land uw. The 
C«n|»ehensive Hui recommends 
use of this parcel for suburban 
high density residential at den- 
sities that are compatible with 
single family use in accordance 
with other Plan policies. Said 
pared cmtains 19 acres. KEMPS- 
VILLBBORmiOR 

CONPmnNAL USE PER. 
MlTs 

9. 

An OnUimee ofni ^qdication 
of Robert k Teni Dodd for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 
h(HM occppaiim (day care) on 
the Mfi skte of QiurchiU Drive, 
south of Bnxriceway Drive. Said 
parcel is located at 6^ Churchill 
Drive ud »»tains 11,616 square 
fbet KEMPSVnXE BOROUGH. 

la 

An Ordimnce upon AiqtUcation 
of Ultimate Camay Club, LLC, 
U» a OHMlltional Vm B»init fcnr 
ta mdoot reereattoul facility on 
the nwth side of Virginia BeMh 
Boulevard, east of Newtown 
Ro«i. Sidd pw^l is loc««l at 
3600 Virginia Boach Boulevard. 
#101, «102 A #103, and contains 
3.3 aoes. BAYSU^ BC^OUGH. 

An (Miim^ q>c» hp^Men 
of Contel Cellular, Inc., fw a 
CcmditiMMl Mm ?tmii fw m 80- 
foot communicaticws mwmt on the 
north side of KMtl^n Boulevaid 
beginning at a point 700 fm 
mon or km Mst (rf R«i^ Um. 



Said parcel contains 3.54 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

12. 

An Ordinaire upon A|;q}licati(m 
of P.C.S. Primeco. L.P. for a 
QMditional Use Permit for a 125- 
foot communications tower on the 
east side of Baker R(»d. 200 feet 
more or less north of Northampton 
Boulevard. Said parcel contains 
121 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

13. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of P.C.S. Primeco. L.P. fw a Cot- 
diUonal Use Permit for a rooftop 
communications facility on the 
west side of Independence Boule- 
vard, north of Virginia Beach 
Boulevatd. Said parcel is located 
at 281 Independence Boulevard 
and contains 12,428 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

14. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Hyung J. & Mae Y. Moon for a 
Conditional Use Permit for an 
automobile repair facility (elec- 
trical testing &. repair) on the 
north side of Shore Drive, west of 
Pleasure House Drive. Said parcel 
is located at 4408 Shore Drive 
and contains 1.529 acres. BAY- 
SIDE BOROUGR 

15. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Contel Cellular, Inc.. for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 125- 
foot communications tower on the 
north side of Central Drive, 1300 
feet more or less west of London 
Bridge Road. Said parcel is 
located at 529 Central Drive and 
contains 1.24 acres. LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

16. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of P.C.S.. Primeco. L.P.. for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 180- 
foot communications tower on the 
east side of Butternut Lane, 
343.34 fMt south of Bonney Road. 
Said pared contains 7.000 square 
feet LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

17. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of P.CS. Primeco, L.P., for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 
rooftop communications tower on 
Lots 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, Block 1, 
Lynnhaven Shores. Said parcel is 
located at 3300 Ocean Shore 
Avenue and contains 3.8 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGR 

18. 

An CMinance upcm Applicadm 
of P.C.S. Primeco, L.P. for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 
rooftop communications facility 
at the Mutheast comer of Atlantic 
Avenue ud S7th Street. Said 
ptfcel edWirns 3.2 wm*. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGR 

19. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Cavalier Golf & Yacht Club for 
a Conditional Use Pennit for a 
golf course (exi»nsion of club- 
house) at the northeast and 
northwest intersection of Cardinal 
Road and Starling Court. Said 
parcel is located « 10S2 Cardinal 
Road and contains 20.1 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGR 

RRcnNsinRBATinN nn 
coNPrnnMS! 

20. 

Application of Jane Alga- Sim- 
mons, Jenny L. Hdsler. Naginder 
Dhilton and Shanmjit I%iUon for 
Uie reconsideration of conditions 
placed on the application tot a 
subdivision variance on February 
8. 1982. Property is located noth 
of the eastern t^minus of Glen 
Aidoi Road. KEMPSVILLLE BO- 
ROUGR 

AMINDMRMT TO LAND USB 

PLAN; 

21. 

An Ordinarwe upm ApplicatitHi 
of The FranciKus Canpany. Inc., 
for an amendment to a 30 acre 
site of the Green Run Land Use 
Plan. The proposal is to rede- 
signate 7.3 acres from multiple 
family to cwnmercial or multiple 
family. The lite is located oa the 
n(»th side of Moceu Anne Road. 
400 feet more or less east of S. 
IndqwKieiwe BmitoviRl nd c(m- 
talM 30 acres. KBMPSVILLE 
BOtOUOR 

SZBfiELCLQSyBEi 

22. 

Application of R. Lewis Boggs 
for the discontinuance, closure 
and abandmment oi a pwtion of 
Baltic Avenue beginning at a 
point 300 feet south of Laskin 
RMd and running in a south- 
wesieriy direction akmg die east- 
tm fiogmy Une a distance of 
842.32 fm. OKKt (» less to the 
we^nn boumitty of HoUy RokI. 
Said par»l is variable in width 
and contains 1.131 acr». VIR- 
mOA BEAOI BOROUGR 

n. 

Motion (rf tin City of Virginia 
B«Kb to amend and recvdain 
Sectiou 301 md 601 (tf the aop 
ZMiii Ordinance pertaining to 
use t^iMgm tot fish pon^ md 
Mi ta^taita In dw r^^ndal 
nd qMrtiBwt dlsfricu. More 
dMaUed inftmnatiM is avulabb 
ta teMu^ig DepaitAMtt. 

24. 

MoA» (tf the City of ViqiaUi 



Beach to amend and reordain 
Article II, Chapter 30 of the co<fc5 
of the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, porCiining to borrow pits. 
More detailed information is 
a^wlable in the Planning Depart- 
ment 

25. 

Motion of the City of Virginia 
Beach to amend aihd reordain 
Sections 111 and 227 of the City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
borrow pits. More detailed in- 
formation is available in the 
banning D^artmuit. 

26. 

Motion of tte City of Virginia 
Beach to amend Article 13 of the 
City Zoning Odinance to pomit 
certain light commercial uses as 
a conditional use within the 
Historic and Cultural District. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Planning Depart- 
ment. 

27. 

Motion of the City of Virginia 
Beach to amend Article 2 of the 
City Zoning Ordinance by adding 
Section 225.1 pertaining to bed 
and break&st inns. More detailed 
information is available in the 
Planning Department 

REFERRED BACK TO 
PLANNING CQMMIS.SION BY 
CITY(!OIINriLON7/n/9S: 

28. 

Motion of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Sections 111 and 232.1 
of the City Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to country inns. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Planning Department. 

29. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Jahn W. & Leslie T. Summs for 
a Conditional Use Permit for a 
country inn at the southwest 
comer of Church Point Road and 
Meeting House Road. Said parcel 
is located at 4001 Church Point 
Road and contains 2.7 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED BY PLANNINC. 
COMMTSSTON ON U/m^r 

30. 

Application of R. Lewis Boggs 
for the discontinuance, closure 
and abandonment of the following 
parcels: 

Parcel 1: Alleyway located 
between 29th Street and 30th 
Street beginning at the western 
boundary of Arctic Avenue and 
ranning in a westeriy direction to 
the eastern boundary of Holly 
Road. 

Parcel 2: Alleyway located 
140.15 feet nprth of 27th Strpet 
beginning at ^e eastern boundary 
of Holly Road and running in an 
easteriy direction a distance of 
49.93 feet * 

Said parcels contain 6086.45 
square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGR 

31. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Kempsville Conservative Syna- 
gogue for a Conditional Use 
Pennit for a child care center in a 
religious facility on certain pro- 
perty located at the northern 

tnminus of Indian Udces Boule- 
vud. Said parcel is located at 932 
Indian Lakes Boulevard and 
contains 3.638 acres. KEMPS- 
VOXE BOROUGR 
32. 

An OrdinaiK^ upon Applicadon 
of B&D Trailers, Inc., for a 
Conditional Use Permit for motor 
vehicle renuls (U-Haul) at the 
northeast coTier of Indian River 
Road and Princess Anne Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1800 
Prince» Anne Road and C(mtains 
22.433 square feet. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 
33. 

An Ordinance upm Application 
of Siallings Oil Comiwny for a 
Conditional Um ^rmit for 
gasoline pumps in coi^unction 
with a convenience store and a 
car wash on certain prtqierty 
located at tlw »)utheast comer of 
Dam Neck Road and General 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
ctHitains 1.536 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGR 
34. 

An CMinance upon Applicadon 
of Thomas H. Wilkinson for a 
Condidonal Use Peraiit for bulk 
storage on the south side of 
Holland Road, east of Rosemmt 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
3365 Holland RimkI and ccmaiAs I 
19 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
35. 

Application of Onurio De- 
velopment, Inc., for the r«»n- 
sideration of ccmditions placed on 
the application fw a change of 
zoning from R-6 Residential 
Dittrict to B-2 (immunity Buri- 
ns District on Mwch 26, 1984. 
PR^>erty is located to 470 feet 
nst of KemptiiUe RcMd. TtC feet 
south of Indian River Road. 
KEMPSVILLE BCXtOUOR 

All interosted penons are 
invited to Bitmd. 

If you we pbymdly dtoi^M 
or visully inpiAed Md Med 
assistance at the meeting, pkmo 
call the CITY O^'S COTICB 



at 427-4303. Hearing imfMured, 
call: TDD only at 427-4305. (TDD 

I FUBUC NOTICE "^ 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEAR- 
ING 

Virginia: 

The reguhff meeting of the City 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach wiU be held in die Council 
Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center. , 
Princess Anne SuUon. Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on Tuesday. 
December 12, 1995 at 3:00 p.m., 
at which time the following 
q>plicati(ms will be heard; 

CHANfiR OF rniSTTIWO 

DISTRin 

CLA.SSTRirATinM. 

KEMP.svnT.RRnaniinH 

1. 

An Ordinance upon Aiq>licad(m 
of Grcepich Siqjply Corporation, 
a Virginia Corporation for a 
Conditional Change ^f 7^mf 
Distfict riagsificBtinn from I-l 
Light Industrial District to 1-2 
Heavy Industrial District on die 
north side of Arrowhead Drive, 
west of Princess Anne Road. The 
proposed zoning classification 
change to C(Miditional 1-2 is for 
industrial land use. The 
Comprehensive Plan recommends 
one of Uiis parcel for industrial 
use in accordance with other plan 
policies. Said property is located 
at 5780, 5784. 5788 and 5792 
Arrowhead Drive and contains 
4.002 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

BAYSIDE BORniTfiH 

1 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Edward B. & Jean M. Snyder. 
Trustee, Snyder Family Trust; 
Checkered Flag Motor Co., Inc., 
for a Change of Zoning n\<^\nf\ 
Classificatinn from R-7.S Re- 
sidential District to B-2 Com- 
munity Business District on die 
soutii side of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard beginning at a point 
265 feet east of Fair Meadows 
Road. The proposed zoning clas- 
sification change to B-2 is for 
general commercial land use. The 
Comprehensive Plan recommends 
use of this parcel for suburban 
medium density residential at 
densities that are compatible widi 
single family use in aa:ordance 
with other Plan policies. Said 
parcel contains 3.29 acres. BAY- 
SIDE BOROUGH. 

CQNDTTTONAL USE 

PSRMIT; 

BAYSIDE BORniinH 

3. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Edward B. & Jean M. Snyder, 
Trustee, Snyder Family Trust; 
Checkned Rag Motor Co., Inc., 
for a Conditional IIm Permit for 

motor vehicle sales on the south 
side of Virginia Beach Boulevard 
beginning at a point 263 feet east 
of Fair Meadows Road. Said 
parcel contains 3.29 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROnnH 

4. 

An Ordinance upon A|q)lication 
of P.C.S. PrimeCo, L.P.. for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a 120- 
foot conununications tower on die 
northwest side of Central Drive, 
southwest of Patent Drive, Said 
parcel is located at 333 Central 
Drive and contains 4.482 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

STREET CLOSiniRi 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

5. 

Application of Hannaford Bros, 
Co., for the discontinuance, clo- 
sure and abandonment of a 
portion of Republic Road (Bon- 
ney Parkway) beginning at a 
point 930 feet more w less west 
of First Colonial Road and 
running westeriy and southu'ly te 
the northern property line of 
Laskin Road. Said parcel is 60 
feet in width. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGR 

All interested parties are 
invited to attend. 

Ruth Hotel Smidi, CMC/AAE 

City Ckm 

If you ve physically disabled 
or visually impaired and need 
assistance u thto meeting, please 
call tiie CITY C2JBRK'S OFFICE 
at 427-4303; Ifearing impaired, 
callTOD only 427-4303 (TDD ■ 
Telephone Device ftv die Dm!) 



Virginia Bea ;h Sun. Friday, December 1. 1995 7 



PUBLIC NOTtcT 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLEJIKS OFFICE 

IN RE: Janet C^bome Risley, 
Fiimtift 

V. Stephen Conln«r Risley, 
DefemUint 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION ■ 
CASE NO. Cm5-3736 

The object of tiiis suit is (to) 
(for) Divorce ■ 1 year sqaratton. 

It is ORDERED thM Stephen 
Cwdner Risley tippeu ami pitWMt 
his interest on or bef(X% Januvy 
8, 1996, which date is no »(»» 
tiian R^ days ^ler entry of Ms 
otter of ^bliotion. 

And it is Airdis ORDERED 
tiiat tilts w(to of {NiblicatiM be 
publisNd oMe a week fw lour 



siKxessive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in tiiis City 
{Htscribed by tiiis court 

November 15. 1995 

J. CURTIS FRUIT. CLERK 

By Alexia Limisey, 

Deputy Cleric 

Public NoHc» 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR 
' THE STATE OF ALASKA AT 
BETHEL 

In die Matter of die Dissolution 
of die Marriage of 

LEIGH ANN HENDERSON and 
CARLOS E. HENDERSON. JR. 
Husband and Wife CASE NO. 
4BE-95-274-CT 

NOTICE TO ABSENT SPOUSE 

TO: CARLOS E. 

HENDERSON, JR. (Absent 
Spouse) 

You are hereby notified dutt a 
Petition for Dissolution of 
Marriage was filed by LEIGH 
ANN HENDERSON on October 4, 
1995. 

The petition sutes that an 
incompatibility of temperament 
has caused the irremediable 
breatalown of your marriage and 
that your whereabouts are 
unknowa 

You must make your 
whereabouts known to die court at 
tills address: Betiiel Trial Court 
P.O. Box 130 Bedid. AK 99559. 

Failure to do so witiiin 30 days 
after die last date of publication/ 
posting of diis notice may result 
in the court granting a decree of 
dissolution of marriage as 
requested in die petition. 

Date October 4. 1995, CLERK 
OF COURT Tanya R. Grant, 

DCDUtV 



tiie Estate have been filed in die 
Clerk's Office, and that six 
months have elapsed since the 
qualification of die Petitioner. 

Enter 11/17/95 

Circuit Court Judge A.B. 
Shockley 

Cwtificd to be a TRUE COPY 

of naad in my custody. 

J. Cwtis Fruit Cl^ 

Circuit Court Virginia Beach, 
Va 

BY: Jeanette S. Jones 

Deputy Cleric 

I ask for diis: 

Jeffrey T. Talbert 

State Bar No. 18068 

Shuttieworth. Ruloff & Gior- 
dano. P.C. 

4425 Corporation Lane, Suite 
300 
Virginia Beach, VA 23462 
Phone: (804) 671-6000 
Fax: (804) 671-6003 
Counsd for I^tidono' 

PUBLIC NOTICE 



z: 



5ufr 



I PUBLIC NOTICE" 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCI 

COURT OF THE CITY OF 

VIRGINIA BEACH on die 17Uj 

day of Nov., 1993 
Re: Esute of Marjorie F. 

Daniel 
Fiducivy No. 93-120 
Chancery No. CH93-3770 
SHOW CAUSE nPHRP 

It appearing diat a report of die 
accounte of Thomas C. Broyles, 
Executor of tiie Estete of tiw 
Estate of Marjorie F. Daniel, de- 
ceased, and of the debts and de- 
muids against her estate has been 
filed in the Clerk's Office, and 
diat six (6) mondii have elapMd 
since dte qualification, on motion 
of Thomas C. Broyles, Executor 
IT IS ORDERED tiiat tiie cre- 
ditors of. and all odiers interested 
in, die Estate do show cause, if 
any diey can, on die ISth day of 
Decembw, 1993. at 9:30 a.m.. or 
as soon dwreafter as counsel may 
be heard, before diis Coun at its 
courtroom, against tiie payment 
and delivery of the Estete of 
Marjorie F. Daniel, deceased, to 
die residuary beneficiaries with- 
out requiring refunding bwub. 

rr IS FURTHER ORDERED 
diat Uiis Show Cause Order be 
published once a week for two 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of gen- 
eral circulation in the City of 
Vii)ginia Beach, Virginia. 

ENTER: NOV 17 1995 

Hwmaa C. Broyles, Esq. 

Kauflnui St Canoles. P.C. 

P.O. Box 3037 

Norfolk, VA 23514-3037 

Cetmtd te be a TRUE COPY 

oi recwd in my custody. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Cleric 

Circuit Court. Virginia Beach. 
Va. 

BY: Jeanette S. Jones 

Dq)uty Clerk 

48-4 
24-12-8 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE 

IN RE: Vicki Yvonne Pradco 

Plaintiff(s) 

V. William Roy I^adco 

Defendant(s) 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION - 
CASENO.CH95-3809 

The object of diis suit is (fw): 
the said plaintiff to obtain a 
divorce A Vinculo Matrimonii 
fnm dte said defendant upon die 
grounds of having lived separate 
and apart without any coha- 
bitetion and witiiout any inter- 
ruption for a period in excess of 
one year, to wit 8 yens. 

It is ORDERED tiiat William 
Roy Pratico appear and protect 
(his) interest, on w before Jan- 
uary 11, 1996, which date is no 
sooner than fifty days after entry 
of dus wder of publicatk>n. 

And it is furtiier ORDERED 
that this order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in Virginia 
Beach iSun, a newspaper of gen- 
eral circulation in diis City pre- 
scribed by diis court 

November 20, 1995 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By Phyllis N. Styron 

Deiiuty Clerk 

48-3 

I PUBLIC NOTICE 1 

Take notice diat on 12/04/93, 
at 10:00 A.M. at die premises of 
4747 Shore Dr. Va. Beach, Va. 
die undersigned will seU at Public 
Auction, fw Msh, reserving unto 
itself the right to bid, Uie f(d- 
lowing vehicle. 1983 Chevrolet S* 
10 Pickup Serial #1GCB514E- 
6F2264674 



PUBLIC NOTlgJ" 



Take notice diat on 12/04/95, 
at 10:00 A.M. at die premises of 
4747 Shore Dr. Va. Beach, Va. 
die undosi^ed wiU sell tt Public 
Auctiwi, fw cash, reserving unte 
itself die right to bid, the fol- 
lowing vehicle. 1987 Isuzu 
Trooper Serial «JAACH1328- 
HS400649 

48-8 
l-i-12-1 

I public"S6ti6e 



VIRGINIA: m THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
OINIA BEACH on die 17Ui day of 
Nov., 1993 

IN RE: ESTATE OF JOSEPH 
R. GREEN, JR., DECEASED 

Chancery No. CH95-1021 

Probate FUe No. 93-394 

SHOW CAUSE AGAINST DIS- 
TIUBUTION ORDER 

This date came Patricia O. 
Bowling, Adminisinttrix of EMte 
of Joseph R. Green Jr.. decMsed 
("Petitioner"), by coun^, upon 
her Amended Petition imviously 
filed in diis matter and, for good 
cause shown, it is hereby OR- 
DERED diat die creditors of. and 
all odi^i interested in, the Emit 
of Joseph R. Green, Jr., deceued, 
shall show cause, if diey can. on 
die IS day of I^cember. 1995 at 
9:30 AM before diis Court why 
pevious distributions of die ass^ 
of die Esute should not be ap- 
proved and why remaining assets I 
of the Estate should not be dis- 
tributed to die beneficiaries, upwi 
execution and delivery of re- 
funding bonds. 

It is further ORDERBD diat die 
foregoing portion of diis C^dw 
riiaU be {NiUished once a vradc 
fw ni^ so^e^ive we^ in dw 
Virginia Bnch Sun, a iwwq^m 
in Virginia Beach, VA, it 
Kp^am$ that a reptm of die 
««ouna of die ^titiww ud of 
die Mm and demands against 



Auction: 1986 PLYMOUTH 
RELIANT (6643) 

Serial Number 1P3BP36D8GF- 
130700 

Auction Itete: DECEMBER 12, 
1995 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motw Company, 7000 N. Miliuvy 
Hwy, Norfolk, Va. 23318. 

NwfoUc Motor Company re- 
serves dte right te bid. 

48-7 
1+12-1 

I PUBLli N6TlfcE 1 

Auction: 1973 CHRYSLER 

NEWPORT (6463) 
Serial Number 41M3C237443 
Auction Date: DECEMBBt 8, 

1995 
Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 

Motw ComfMmy, 7000 N. Kfilitary 

Hwy, Norfolk. Va. 23318. 
Norfolk Motor Company re-t 

serves dte right to bid. 

I PUBLIC NOTICE 1 

Auction: 1985 CHEVROLET 
CAVALIER (6727) 

Serial Number 1GUD35PXF- 
7213796 

Auctiwi IHtt: DECEMBER 10, 
1995 

Time: U:(X) a.m. at Nwfolk 
Ktouir Company, 7000 N. Milittry 
Hwy, Norfolk. Va. 23518. 

Norfolk Moter Company re- 
serves die right te bid. 
41^ 

PUBUC NOTICE '1 
Auction: 1985 BUICK SOMER- 
SET (3269) 

Serial Number 104NJ27U8F- 
M442142 

Ak^ Date: I^^3BMBER 10. 
1993 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Nwfolk 
KfcMw Comjnny. 7000 N, MiUivy 
Hwy. Norfolk, Va 23318. 

Norfolk Motor Company re- 
serves dte right te bid. 

48-5 
1+12-1 



p 



",P * « ^^^m^f^fmpmmmmmWKfW^ 



1, 8 Virginia Beach Sun. Friday. DecembCT 1. 1995 





Classifieds 



CALL TODAY ^ 
TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 
THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



ENTERTAINMENT 



HELP WANTED 



PERSONAL 
RATES 



20 Words 
Or less 



words 



1 time $ 7.50 .35 

2 times $13.50 .70 

4 times $22.50 1.40 

Run your Classified Ad fourtimes^ronly $22.50. You can cancel 
your ad at any time. 



All Ctassifed Ads run In tttree newspapers (The Virginia Beach Sun, The Chwap-| 



edte Post and The Portsm«jtfi Times). No additional «*arge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per pox. 








































20 words 



Run my «l for 

Payment Is enclosed $ 



i»liM. 



Make check payable to Byerly Pubiicattons 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327. Chesapeake, Va. 23327 

Name 

Address ___^ 

City 

FOR HELP with your Classified Ad. please call 547-4571 . 

COMBINATION RATE: Run thk tame ptnonal ad In any oHiar Byarty Publlc«lant nwwpapf tor an 
aiMllonal t3 on* ttna, tS Mn Unm, $7 tour tltTw. Nnnpapan In FranMin. Enporla, LawrancmH*. 
Oimiriddit and Patartbuig. Call S47-4S71 for (Malt. 



AIRLINE TICKETS 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Kenmora R«frig«rator, side by aids 
$375 OBO, 3 wheel electric cart/ 
wheelchair, w/ battery & power 
charger w/ crutch holder in good 
condition $400 OBO 451-3105. 
12/1 

Bassinet whfte only 2 1/2 months 
$30. Call Julie work 547-4571 
home 398-0902. tfn 

Pine Thorn asville dinning room 
table and chaira, 2 arm chairs, all 
chairs with padding plus 2 extra 
leaves for table. $1000 or best 
offer. 482-1428. tfn 

FREE- used large «K>oden desk 3 
.drawers on one side, 1 large door 
on other. You haul away. Call 547- 
4571 for directions. 

Queen- size waterbed for sale. Six 
drawer pedestal with three 
cabinets. Headboard with mirror 
and 2 lamps. Mattress pad, 
bumper rails and heater included 
in price. $350.00. CaU 429-9316. 
tfns 

Sears 15.5 HP 42" cut riding lawn 
tractor. Run less than 50 hours. 
$1500 negotiable. 429-9132 
before 9 pm. tfnst 

Fisher Price kitchen set $20.00. 
Baby crib ( no hardware or mat- 
tress ) $20.00. Full size waterbed 
mattress, with headboard $75.00. 
1 box of assorted paper back 
books $3.00. Call 399-7907 after 
6 p.m. Monday - Friday. 

Oaybed - White iron & brass, W/2 
Orthopedic Mattress, still in plastic, 
pop up tmndle. Cost $ 800 sell for 
$325. Call 481-6748. 12^ 



Ferrari- ISIS- 328 red. 

$3,000 dollar stereo, telephone, 
radar. 17,000 miles, excellent 
condition. 46,000. Bob 804-295- 
8040. 12/15 



AUTOS / JUNK • WANTED 



AFTIR 6 437-M92 

Professtonal Exotic male/ female 
dancers and masseuse on call 
24hrsll DON'T CALL THE REST- 
WE'VE GOT THE BESTI AvaihiMe 
for dubs/ privsrta parties. 1 2/1 5 



One way, anytime, anywhere in 
U.S. $300. Roundtrip no advance 
for $425. Call 1-800-925-4704 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



$ ^VE $ SLASH YOUR 
GROCERY BILLS BY UP TO 50%. 

CALL FOR DETAILS: 804-340- 
5»4, 12/15 

ASTROLOGY SERVK;ES 

Your personal computer horo- 
scope, no 900 #'s. For informatten 
Send $2.00/ refunded first order 
to: CEMA 522 Austin St. Norfolk 
Va. 23503. 12/8 

SELECTIVE SINGLES DANCE 
EVERY MONDAY! 

Dating services are not for usi 
Biggest singles party « Tidewater 
for the over 28 career singles. 
7.00 til mWnight. Dress casuail Tell 
a single friendl Mitty's, Omni 
Newport News Hotel, $5. l-64/Exit 
258-A. 804-249-5452. Lila. 
12/29 



"DONATE**CARS" 

"BOATS"RVS" 

"TRUCKS" 

Jewish Heritage for the Blind. Tax 

deductit>le. Prompt pick-up. 

NEED NOT RUN. 

1-800-2-DONATE 

1-800-236-6283 

12/1 



" DONT DRINK THE WATER" 

Countar top water treatment 
system. Filters out Chhsrine, lead 
and many other common water 
pollutants up to 10,000 gallons. 
NTL tested. 99% reduction 
Guaranteed. Easy to install. 
Christmas special 199.95 includes 
shipping and handling. Please 
send check or money order to 
Damon P.O. Box 62382 Va 
Beach, Va 23466 or call 579- 
1452, for free fwme de mo. 12/1 

Mormons, JW's, Masonry, New 
Age; What do they really believe? 
For free booklet call Cornerstone 
Ministries at 1-868-0793. 12/8 



Bed Brass - Queen size with 
orthopedic mattress set. Still in 
plastc. Cost $1,000 sell for $300. 
CaU 481-7191. 12/8 



ANTIQUES / COLLECTIBLES 



BARBIES WANTED 

Collector buying Barbie, Francie, 
Skipper, dolls & clothes 1959- 
1972. 467-4879. 12/1 

COLLECTIBLE JEWELRY- Rings, 
watches, broaches, pendants 
necklaces, bracelets and rare 
costume pieces. Made of 14K & 
19K, sterling and diamonds, 
emeralds, ruth's, amethysts and 
other beautiful stones. Great 
Christmas gifts at bargain prk:es. 
Call 482-4147. 12/1 

ANTIQUES- 10,000 SQUARE FT. 

of artglras, furniture, paintings, 
docks, much moral 
1804 Granby St. 
622-0905 dir. . 

12/15 



Service Directory 



ASPHALT /CONCRETE 



MASSAGE 



HOBBS CdNCf^TE 

driveways. Pool Decks, Gars^e 
*iWr Porch Slabs. Slabs, etc. 
Call 545-1210. 



AUTO SERVICE 



BAL0WWTOWII«3 

Flat bed service $30 

Days 545-6002. 

Evenings, beeper 578-^81 

Junk cars bought $50 & up. 

12« 



MASSAGE BY TMJ 

Carpal Tunnel, headadtes, back 
pains, whiplash, arthritis, hernias, 
chronic pains, fatigue, hip/ leg 
problems. Aaron 428-6923, Emily 
747-0365. 12«9 

ATLANTIS B<X)Y WORKS 

Massage, Deep tissue, 
relaxing. Reflexology, Yoga 
therapy. Piofesstonally trained. 
CHRISTMAS GIFT CERTIFI- 
CATES AVAILABLE! Call 
Mk:heal,.481-1472. 12/1 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



CHILD CARE 



GREAT BRIDGE AREA- Child care 
in my home, all ages. Full-time, 
Part-time. Meals & snacks 
provided. Plenty <rf activities, fully 
supervised, Licensed/ insured, 
non-smoker. Quality care in a 
family home. CaU anytime 482- 
^65 or 519-4<%7, pager. 12^2 

INDIAN RIVER/ KEMPSVILLE- 

Lkiensed, education, professkinal, 
USOA. Fenced in yard aH meals 
and snadts. Degreed teacher plus 
friendly horhe enviorment. 3 
openings ;%5-44S5 Claire. 12/1 



SOAR INTO AN EASEFUL AND 
RESTFUL MASSAGE. For 

physical comfort and relaxation 
purposes. Ethical/ Call Leanne or 
Ertea at 366-0226. 12/1 



Santa fwr C^rMiras 

private parties, 

house veits 

4 yrs. experience at 

Lynnhaven Mall. 

Call 471-66-05 wk. 427-4433 

12/22 

Disc jockeys available for 
Christmas & New years parties, 
wedding receptions etc. Startir^ 
at $175, contact Rose or Durant at 
857-7749. Gospel groups 
available for fund raisers. Bands 
also available. 12/22 



PAINTING / DECORATING 



HERTTAGE PAINTMG CO. 

kMeriors, ExterkKs, 

^mm Washlf^. Decks, 

Shert Rod< Repairs, Spadtling. 

Lk^nsed/ Insured 

Free Estimates 

436-3268 



Santa Claus 

For house (Ms & parties 

Call 543-7447 

12«2 



••WIPfWITS'* 

%>eciaiizing in «wrd pro<»ssing 
and data entry. Experleiwed with 
Word Perfect 5.1 and Lotus. 
Rea^maUe rates. 3^-14^. 



POWER WASHING 



MASSAGE 



AB$CXjUTB.YDMNE 

C ft^ a p wl i e lo^tionl 
r^jfeMion^ MM» C^rt^d. 

cm Pauta 437^21 or ^7^ 

12/15 



PRK^IRE CLEAim^ 

2500 - $599, 32(» - $899, 

Hondas. 13hp, 3200 PSI, $1198. 

4<K) PSI. $1699. Call for Fadory 

DIredCttirtog. 

24/hrs Ovwflight D^iv^. 1-8(K)- 

917-W^H(^74) 

12/1 



TOWING 



D&D TOWING 

Professional wredcer servk^s, 
AAA i^iroved- 24 houra, Uc^ 
tows $25.00. Cmh for cars any 
conditbn. LicenMd/ Certffii^ 
Insured. DO TCW !« (M84^ 

12/15 



We Aiak oar ehflA«B a part of oundvtm, Om^ m tbcy p-«w 
■P they w^tA very miML ndeceive im. 

' -44ii^BMWax 



$$ CASH PAID $$ 

For vehwies, 1980 and up, with 
bad engines, bad transmissbns or 
wrecked. Some exceptions. Call 
456-0057. 12/8 

AAA-1 AUTO JUNK 

Junked or wred^ed call for top 
prices. Ihr. pickup. 545-6002. 

AUTOS ACCEPTED 

any make, year or condition 

TOP $$$ 

FAST FREE TOWINGI 

545-2821 

12^ 

JUI^CARS 

Peck Recyding now buying whole 
cars at Elm Ave. Ports. VA. Call 
399-4075 for info. 12/1 



FARM /LAND /TIMBER 



BOATS 



TIERRA- 1985 - 27 FT 

Continental, twin volvo, every 
option, excellent condition, 81 
original hours. Bob 804-295-8040 

12/15 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



Steel building business is 
booming!! National Manufacturer 
is qualifying dealers in seled open 
martcets. Big profits on sales and/ 
or construdbn. Call (303) 759- 
3200, ext. 2300. 12« 

Executive Search- A well 
established health care company 
opens new diviston poised in the 
Preventive Health Care Market. 
Seeking several individuals to 
head up expansbn in Tidewirter 
area. For information send resume 
to: Kim Murphy, Personnel, 1719 
Birch Trail Circle, Suite E, 
Chesapeake, Va. 23320. 12/1 



EXTRAORDINARY CAREER OPP- 
ORTUNITY. Available with the 
fastest growing telecomm- 
unications company in America. 
Motivated seH starters, who desire 
their own business needed 496- 
9037. 12/8 



Either you want to have personal 
and finandal freedom in the next 
36 months or you donti If you do 
It only takes a phone call. H you 
doni respond to this ad. in 6 
months, You'll wish you hadi 4K- 
0806. 11/24 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS 



PERSONALIZED CHILDREN'S 
STORYBOOKS. Great presents 
for holbays, Urthdays, etc. Find 
out about this hot- selling gifti 
Amazing recorded message gives 
details. 468-1561, ext 106. 

12/15 



r 



CLASSES /SCHOOLS 



BARMASTERS OF VA BEACH 
Bartendhig school 
1141 independence Blvd. 1-2 wks 
day / evening classes Job/ place- 
ment assi^anM. Lowest tuitbn in 
area. For Free Class / 464-05(K). 

12/15 



COINS / STAMPS / HOBBIES 



BUY SELL COINS • GoU & Sihrer 

Hems. Military Items & other 
collectibles. Coiledors Choice, 
5441 Va. Beach Blvd. 497-5^0. 

12^ 



COMPUTERS / EQUIPMENT 



MEGA CONSULTANTS- HOME 
TUTOR ^RVK^. Windows, Dos, 
internet, Computer set up. Mon- 
Sat.' 9am -^OTi. 855-8389. 1 2/1 

ALLPC 
REPAV^ AND UPGRADES 

PCDOC4M-8^ 

12/1 



ENTERTAINMENT 



ALL STAIg BTTERTAINMCNT 

High class ladies for prIvaM 
IMrtles, danemg, dining, inMs^e 
and morel DON'T HESITATE 
CAa FOR THE BEST. 4m-m& 



CAMDEN COUNTY. NC 

312 acres wooded, 

48 »;res cleared. 

Sealed bkjs only through 12/7/95 

NO LOTS 

Mbheal D. Neal 919-:»6-2747 

12/1 

WAVERLY- 36 ACRES 

in town. Part wooded. Rd. 
Frontage. 39,900. 10% down. 
Owner 804-949-0099. 1 1 /24 

SUSSEX COUNTY- 60 ACRES 

Rd. Frontage. 85 mis. to Va. 
Beach $49,900. Owner 804-949- 
0099. 11/24 



ABSOLUTE STEAL 
2.25 ACRES- $12,990 
Minutes to Chesapeake Bay- 
Beautifully wooded in charming 
country setting. Ready to build on 
state road. Includes ownership of 
private dock and pier. Excellent 
financing. Call now 1-800-775- 
4563 ext. 6399. 



LAND BARGAIN 

37+ ACRES $54,900 

MUST SELL! 

Owner needs cash. 15 acres crop 
land. Balance wooded. Suffolk. 
Terms. 804-826-6602. 

52.372 acre farm house and out 
buildings for sale in a highly 
desirable neighborhood of 
Southampton County. Long road 
frontage, if interested, call 804- 
562-5133. 



FIREWOOD /FUELS 



HELP WANTED 



•-HO!HO!HOf" 

TELEMARKETMO-CALL 

CBITER 

Don't Wait Until After The 
Holidays, Earn Your $$$ NOW. 
Seeking enthusiastic individuals 
with a great phone vobe and a 
personality to match. Permanent 
Part time Positions with Day and 
Evening hours available. Paid 
Training and Daily $$$ incenthres. 
Call 368-0273. 12/8 



MARKETING 
REPRESENTATIVES 
*** Indound & Outbound Calls *** 
Immediate openings for a 
Vacation Resort Company. We 
offer paid training, a positive wort( 
enviorment, and opportunity for 
advancement. If you are 
enthusiastic, articulate, and 
serbus about earning $13/ hour... 
Call 368-0273. 12/1 

PART TIME- HICKORY FARMS 

Still Hiring, Experienced Sales 
People for Seasonal Employment. 
Call 461-1771, Mon-Fri 10-5. 
12/1 

TEXAS REFINERY CORP.- needs 
mature (responsible) person now 
in CHESAPEAKE area. 
Regardless of training, mite W.B. 
Hopkins, Dopt. w-23320, Box 711, 
Ft. Wor{h,TX. 76101. 12/8 

WORK AT HOME-EARN $500 
WEEKLY. Selling a br^ distance 
service over the phone. Paid 
weekly, monthly bonus. No 
ejQMriem^ necessary- will train. 
Please call 1-800-842-1409. 

* POSTAL JOBS • 

12.68/ hr to start, plus beneftts. 
Carriers, sorters, computer 
trainees. For an applbatbn and 
exam inform«bn, caH 1-219-791- 
1191, ext. p43 9am-^m 7 days. 
\2» 

CHRISTMAS HELP 

Part-time, some full-time. Startii^ 
pay $10.15, good for diywmkers, 
second income and students, 
FtoxMe schedutos, No experience 
nMenary, training provktod 460- 
5600. 12/1 

IMOYMMI NEEDED 

in exchai^e for free room & 
board (gari^e apartment). Need 
some experience with 
maintenance, carpentry, 
^unMng, eledrial, Mc... CaU 491- 
1959. 12/1 



BABY SITTER NEEDED- For 

occasional nights out (2-3 a 
week) 3 children ages 5 yrs, 6 
yrs, and 9 ntonths. Older 2 
usually asleep. Must be 
dependable. Please call Julie 
wk. 547-4871, hm 398-0902. 

TEXAS REFINERY CORP. 
needs mature (responsible) 
person now in PORTSMOUTH 
area. Regardless of training, write 
W.A Hopkins, Dept. W-23705, 
Box 711, Ft Wortii^TX 76101. 



We are taoking for a few eneigetk: 
people to sell subscriptions to 
three local publications. If 
interested call Julie a t 547-4571. 

'■■ ■ ' ' !■ 11 I I gill. 

TELEPHONE SALES 

' Established business In Great 
Brbge area of Chesapeake Is 
seeking full-time or part-time 
telephone solicitors. Experience 
prefered, but not necessary. You 

Vmust have good spelling ability, 
legible handwritting and an 
intelligent willingness to learn. 
Most important you must enjoy 
dealing with the public by 
telephone . You should live In or 
near the Great Brbge area. Salary 
is based on hours worked. If 
interested, please write ful^, giving 
your qualifbatbns to: Telephone 
Solicitor, P.O. box 1327, 
Chesapeake, Va. 23327. 

MARKETING 

International brokerage firm has 5 

openings. Applicants must t>e fun 

& people oriented. Unlimited 

potential $50,000 + Call 423- 

7275. 



HORSES /CATTLE ETC 



FirewKMd- 95% oak cut, split $ 
delhrered. 1 ton pbkup. Call 804- 
860-8046. 12/8 



SEEKING PRIVATE BOARD- For 

2 sweet old riding horses. Feed 
supplied . Call 549-1898. 12/8 

Angus Bulls- Service age, call 
Lawerenceville 804-848-2621. 

12/1 



HOMES /SALE 



DAVtDSMftL- CHESAPEATCE- 

Neariy new 4 bedroom ranch w/ 
garage on 1/4 acre lot. Western 
Branch schools. 129,900 Alice 
Watson 523-2121 or 721-3012. 
Century 21 Accord. 12/1 



Norfolk Highlands- 1116 Hawthorn 
Dr. New custom built. 3 bedroom, 
2 bath, attach garage, 
maintenance free. Brtek skirted, 
vaulted ceilings, recess lighting. 
Open house Set's & Sun's 1-4. 
Pefley Real Estate Corp. 425- 
6916 or 629-9992. 

ALL CLOSING COST PAID 

on any VA/HUD owned home, vet 
or no n -vet. Bobby Scott & 
Associates Real Estate 490-7826. 

12/15 



LOANS /MORTGAGES 



HOME OWNERS 

We have the best 

rates In towm. 

All credit oonsklered. 

1st, 2nd, 3rd Mortaqes. 

Very Low Payments 

ConsolMate BiOs. 

No Equity? 

Bankmptoy OKI 

Call 1-800-664-6779 

Bill or Lews 

INFINITY FUNDING CORP. 

12/22 

FAST CASH 
for HOMEOWNERS 

All credit considerad. 
1st 2nd, 3rd Mortgages. Low 
rates. Lx)w payments. 
Consolki^ bjlte. 

Ho Equ^? 

Bankruptcy OK, 

Call 1-e00-254-i»06 

Jeff Rusch 

UNITED SOUTHERN MORTAGE 

12^ 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CURRITUCK COUNTY- 5 dioice 
iMJllding bts. Some «raod^. New 
the Cotton Gin at Jan^isbui^. 
Prbed to selL $18,500 ea. Bill 
MMm 1-919-453-2126 6wt% 1- 
919-4^-6950 eves. 12/1 



MOBILE HOMES /RENT 



GATES, NC- 3 BORW 2 BATH 

<^tot ne^jhborhewd Hwy 13 8,. 5 
min/ VA line. Lot rent/ Water 
imritNied, AvMMe rwwl Call 1- 
919^7-0310. 



Vifjdnia Beach Sun. Friday. December 1. 1995 9 



Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



MOBILE HOMES /SALE 



MOBILE HOME SITES 



COLONIAL RUN MOBILE HOME 
PARK ■ Vacant spaces- Rents av- 
eraging $237 - $252 monthly. 
Sites available now. 804-464- 
0770. 12/15 



MOTORCYCLES 



WEBUYUSEDHARLEYSI! 

SOUTHSIDE HARLEV DAVIDSON 
499-8964. 

1/19 

I IJH Miy -* j - ■ ■■ PP i i i i I H ill I 

harLeys wanVeoiii 

Cash for your HARLEYS todayl 
Top dollar paid for good clean 
HARLEYS. take the hassle out of 
selling your HARLEY. I will come 
to you. Cash paid for info on 
HARLEYS for sale. Call CHAD at 
Hampton Roads Harley- Davidson, 
804-857-6549. and Peninsula 
804-2^-5221. Mon-Fri. 9-7. Sat 
9-5. Va. DIr. 12/22 

CASH 

TOP DOLLAR PAID 

For motorcycles, water craft, ATVs 

& 4 wheelers. Will pick up at your 

location. Call anytime. Leave 

message if no answer. 

SRS Motor Sports 

910-272-9827 

12/1 

1993 Honda Gold Wing/As- 
pencade. Black. 8629 original 
miles. $11,000 negtMlable. Call 
429-9132 before 9 pm. tfnst 



MUSICAL 



PIANO FOR SALE 
A responsble person to take on a 
low monthly payment of a 
beautiful consoto piano, no money 
down. Call toll free: 1-800-609- 
1177. 

(MKYO STEREO RECBVER 

Kenwood CD player, Pioneer 
Cassette deck, whh bose speakers 
$8(K} or best offer. 919^73-3595, 
Manteo. 



PERSONALS 



My name is David, i am 2 1/2. 
living in Christian family. Mommy is 
R.N. staying home with me. We 
want a brother or sister. Can pay 
expense*. Call Paul And Mary. 
703-257-5070. 12« 



Get A Life! 



:JMStAnApartfT»ntl| 



LUXURY APARTMENTS 
&TOWNHOMES 

nnSM (»f!H • 11MM COURTS 
MOZZI'i^lMrY STAFF 

fJ{o[Cy (Point 

CALL424.TO67 

On PravMmet M^ 2 Mm WMt of 
Mtary Hwyi OpM Itoi • §M. I • S 



PERSONALS 



2 Bedroom Furnished 
Portsmouth area $ 3,000 cash or 
$ 1,M0 and $ 200 for 12 months , 
12 wide. Call 485-3712 or 804- 
262-0604. 12/22 

Skylbia 91- 14 x 80, 3 bedroom, 
2 bath. Celling fans throughout, 
refrigerator, stove, screened 
porch, fenced, shed, wash/ dry 
possible, 20,500. Call 545-9190. 
12/1 

Clayton- 91 2 bedrooms, 2 full 
baths, hot tub in master bedroom. 
Central heat & A/C, inside just 
remodeled. Must see $18,000. 
919-232-3816. 12/1 

Big beautiful doublewide. 

Only 1200 down. 

Only $285 per montfi. 

Only one to sell. 

Call 804-249-0764 

sp36k apr9.7tim 300 

Oakwood Homes. 12/8 

Mobile Home Finance Co. 

Has money to lend 

No points, No closing cost. 

$799 down will guarantee you a 

home . 1st. Time Buyer Program. 

Call 804-249-0764. 

Oakwood Homes 12/8 

1995 3 BR Repo 

Assume pmts. of only $215. 

And move in today. 

Call 804-249-0764. 

sp 18.5k tim 180 dp 1000 apr 

1 1 .0. Oakwood Homes. 1 21% 



ADOPT: A young toving couple, 
wish to provide your white 
newborn with endless love and 
security. Full time mom and 
devoted professional dad. Legal 
and Medical expenses paid. 
Please call Denise & Paul 1-800- 
491-1756. 12/1 

Childless couple unable to 
conceive, wishes to adopt infant. 
Loving secure home, with full time 
mom awaits, contact Darrell or 
Theresia anytime, 804-467-5751. 

12/1 

Loving couple- RN and company 
supervisor , wishes to adopt 
newborn into warm and nurturing 
home. Please call toll free 1-800- 
484-1477 code 3801. 

ADOPTION 

Loving childless couple wishes to 
adopt infant. Happy, secure home 
with full time mother. Medical & 
Legal expenses paid. Please call 
Dian & Joe, 1-800-579-1860 or 
collect 703-830-1341. 12/1 

ADOPTKM 

We know you are faced with a 
difficult choice. Let us help you 
find a loving, caring home for your 
baby. WE ARE EASY TO TALK 
TO. Please call FRIENDS IN 
ADOPTION 1-W0-962-3678. 1/5 

SPORTSI TRIVIA AND SCORES. 
COLLEGE AND PROFESSIONAL. 
FOOTBALL, BASEBALL, BASK- 
ETBALL, HOCKEY. UPDATED 
DAILY. 1-900-226-4967. (2.95 
PER MINUTE) MUST BE 18 
YEARS. TOUCH TONE 
REQUIRED. 12^ 

BEACH PARTY ENTEflTAINMENT 

Hottest dateline 1-900-287-6445 

$2.99/ min. Must be 18-f 
12^ 

New Life Christian Dating 
Agency Inc. 

Looking for someone special? Call 
today for info about special 
introductory rata. No obligation. 
CaH free 1-100-823-7789. 

Match Maker Network 
Share This Holiday Season Call 
1-900-3S8-7879 ext 12. One' 
simple phone call, and see for 
yourself just how easy it can be. 
Honest! CALL TODAY $2.49/ 
min, 18 yrs + HTP Va. Bch. Va. 
804-430-DATE (3283) 2/9 



Looking for someone aboard the 
USS Liberty In the 60's. Ple^e 
write to P.O. BOX 1327 
Chesapeake, Va 23320 Attn: USS 
Liberty. My father is looking for 
shipmates. tfn 



24 year old mother of 3 seeking a 
friend to go out and have fun with 
NO HANKY PANKYI Interest are: 
singing, Karaoke, Country & 
Classic rock, comedy clubs, danc- 
ing, etc... Looks & age unimpor- 
4«fltl-Serious inquires only. 
LWs be friendsl Write: P.O. Box 
1327 (A-1) Chesapeake, Va. 
23327. 



INSTRUCTION 



TRACTOR-TRAILER 

•No Experience needed 
•DOT Certification. 
•Full or part-time 
training 

•Placement Dept. 
•Finandng Available 
•COL Training 

ALLIANCE 

TRACTOR-TRAN.ER 
TRAINING CENTERS 




PETS 



Border collie puppies- very kiyal 
intelligent pets/ exceptional 
herding dogs $75.00 each. OMer 
Male / Female, Free to good 
home 804-562-2833. 12/8 

Pit bull pups- ADBA/UKC 
registered. 1st shots and wormed. 
Parents on premises. Stud service 
available. Call 340-8373. 12/1 

HAPPY JACK SKIN BALM: 
Checks scratching, relieves hot 
spots and irritated skin without 
steroids. Promotes healing & hair 
growth on dogs & catsi Available 
O-T-C INDUSTRIAL HDWE 543- 
2237. 

FREE- 8wk oki female kitten, black 
& white. Very friendly to good 
home only. Call 399-7907. tfn 



FREE- to good home 1 female cat 
lyear and kittens . also 2 afgan 
hound mix free to good home, all 
very bveable. call 474-1791 



Looking for a flea-ttek shampoo 
that kills fleas, monthly flea 
programs cant . Ask INDUSTRIAL 
HARDWARE 544-2232 about 
HAPPY JACK PARACIDE 
shampoo. Contains no pyrethrinsi 



POSITIONS WANTED 



CNA / COMPANION- Will work for 
one family, experience in bowel 
program & catheter. Quad & 
handicap experience. Call Doug 
653-6746. 



ROOMS FOR RENT 



GREAT BRIDGE CONDO 

Single female seeks same 2 
bedroom, washer/ dryer. $300 
month includes all. $150 deposit, 
no pets. 548-4231. 12/8 



ROOM FOR RENT- GREEN RUN 
AREA. Large furnished room, 
private bath, walk in closet, 
laundry & klldien privileges. $75 
wk. deposit required, references 
Dave/Deb 468-1006. 12/1 

THOMAS NELSON HOTEL 

Phone, color TV, daily maid 
service. Daily $21 -i- tax, also 
weekly rates 622-4341, Granby 
St., Downtown NorfoRc. 12/1 



TO SHARE 



Lake Placid- Professbnal would 
like to share home with same. 
Convenient to Oceana base, 
beach & Lynnhaven Mall. All 
privileges, outdoor spa, $250 plus 
share utilities with small deposit. 
430-3625. 



For special flavor 
put a piece of choco- 
late or a vanilla bean In 
the coftae nitar before 
you add the coffee. 



RI I All 



Ccmie moA. with us arxi find out why 
otff associates rate us an average of 
40% higher than our other retailers 
aroufld me (»untiy in all areas of job 
satis&ction. 

We have positions for Manager 
1MBee,Aa8iitaBtManagtfaxlnill 
iBdftrtTtae Sales Aasocfaitcs at dK 
Lyn^vcB MaD. Bendiu inchide: 

•401KPad:age 

•Health & Dental 

•Mwthfy Team Bonus 

•Camr AdvancenKnt 
Weenqriueize: 

•Nurturing Peiscnal Develqsnoit 

•ReralttttnaryDsiomn Service 

•F(»tering Teamwork 
For an interview, call 1-800-756-6266 
vok% mail box #4447. Easy SpiriL A 
dJyfaMnof Nine Wot GnHy,IiK. EOE 






€mitm& in W^t ^Ulage 

Saturday, ^^^mber 2, 9 am. - 4 p.m. 

at Um Oiuavdm ComnrnniiyJieM 

m\ &^pee t>me in J'^m^nan Sv^i^ 

(CffJImy. m ammfimn Cm»sl.Ai^ tank) 

J^mturing Something for 
Emryorw... 



TOWN HOMES / RENT 



ELEGANT TOWN HOUSE 
Near Fredernk & Deep Creek in 
Portsmouth, just off 1-264. 
Fireplace, 2 bedroom, 1 1/2 baths, 
appliances included. Immaculate 
condition. $450.00 monthly. 
Lease and security deposit. 
Owner. Call 804-826-6602. 12/1 



TRAVEL 



SKI SNOW SH(^ 

West Virginia. 1 & 2 bedroom 
units, sleeps 4-8. Whistle punk. 
Snowcrest, Powderidge, Fireplace, 
cable, VCR, Jacuzzi, owner rates. 
Call Linda 803-277-7449, fax 803- 
299-1323. 11/24 

BAHAMA CRUISE 

5 days / 4 nights 

UNDERBOOKED! MUST SELL! 

$279 / couple! LIMITED TICKETS! 

1-800-935-9999 EXT. 6423 

Monday through Saturday 

9am- 10pm 



TRUCKS FOR SALE 



1950 Ford Pickup 

Backwoods handyman 

Special I Has 2 motors 

$350 ( does not run) 

Call 479-9863 after 1 pm 

Monday-Friday 1 pm to 7 pm 

Saturday & Sund ay. 

91 FORD EXPLORER XLT 
Loaded, am/fm cassette stereo, 
power windows & door locks, tilt 
wheel, cruise control, sun/moon 
roof. Good condition. $12,000, 
book value $15,300. Call 429- 
9316. tfnsb 



WANTED TO BUY 



Looking for parts for a 1967 Ford 
Fairlane 4 door Sedan. Please call 
399-7907 after 6:00 until 10:00 
pm tfn 



AAGUITARS WANTED** 

Cash paid for used acoustic or 
electric guitars and amps. 595- 
4663. 12« 



WATERFRONT /SALE 



Lake Gaston- One-of-a-kind! 3 ac. 
600* Owner financing 804-848- 
3632 ( wk days) 1-919-586-6670 
( other times ) 



WEIGHT LOSS / CONTROL 



You've tried tiie rest, now try the 
best! Put our diet to the test, all 
natural proven weight loss 
program. Call now 1-800-296- 
8235. 



THINKING OF BUYING A 
NEW CAR OR TRUCK? 

Call us before you purchase your 
fwwvehk:le. We will ioc^, nego- 
li^ and obt^n the kmest pos- 
sible price for the vehkte of your 
chotee. We even advise you on 
trade-Ins. optk}ns, v«wrwties aid 
reb^BS. We work foryou n(4 the 
dealer. 

Don't Overpay 

Call Us Today! 

(1-800-370-2882) 

PROFESSIONAL 
AUTO 

CONSULTANTS 

Waverly. VA 



• ■ ■ 



MISSING CAT 
Old Gr^t Neck Rd. Area 

$500 

WARD 

Bbck, 

wkitepaws, 

f^ttem 

fiKeand 

ttamch. 

■o^nd, 

itanliuiii il 

ilMrttaired. 
Nteolar. 

LOSTg/« 

CaORoy 

Wbmk 

7484 or 
-^Uor 
lU4or 
I5S-3071 




(AlD NETWORK J 
i CLASSIFIEDS ^ 

BUNKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Claeslf leds are 

published In 78 state newspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $225. 

(For more than 25 words there Is an additional 
charge of $8.00 per word.) 

Call 04T"4971i for Classified RepresentatW 



SBZED CARS FROM $175 PondiM. tMyOncimdSAVECtlTOCWYkrNEW TAWORO, N.C. - IITO'i VIctomVTwo- 
C««in,Cli«y>.8MW'i.CoivMMt.AlnFREEColwC«lili>g1-«(M(Z4197. Slny.SMilniom.31/2bi»i.4,4{IOa<).ll. 
jMff,4WD'i. Ymi HM. TolliMl-aOO- BtuiMil MMng, tuMlltot condHloal 

NM77I Eit M1M tot atm» iMngi • BOWHUNTWQ BJUPMeNT. BowIiimIm* taefiOOM. <M Rudy Dwk. Tutxv 
Fm. (HhouN nmam, Amdct'i lugMI m- RmIW. (til) K}-7SM. 

cNfy uppiar, atsoltt owSJXIObONliwIkH 
GOVERNHEHT FOflEOOSED HOMES IWI«it2M0%0«l«al. Ctf 1-M0-73g- Mnn-Soto4Tlira,t20MI»SlgnOn 
iorpMMiMMt). IMtaquMtTi«,flapo'i, aeSTIortrM 1Mp«|ioiMo(. Tap Tmim Ewn $t03,IM0», Uijor B«n- 

REfft,FaC,RTC.IRS. Your MM. Toi tMMoWliDMlMidPty.DiMniSclwol 

kw i-Wmum Eld. IHtM tot cui- WTO WITHOUT QU8SESI 8*. i^, Qn*WiliiOiM. COMRMTniMporttOO- 
raMWIigr Fm. iian«irg«l,|g«iniMiwlonlMtiM MI-43M. ni«HliCtfll)IM3>«2l 

mMi. AMm pIM dmioMd. OMm 
H0IIETYPIST8NSDBI.AInPCMM^lplMd.F(w■iDnnintrml(H()H2^ NATIONAL OnoCEflY COUPON Boota. 
pnoMiariMn. t4MN'yMrln»Mpi>- 7320M.23>,(4(l4H1-5S70.FtaHM)M1- IM ■• t1J8 ad). In qutnWy FratMo 
MW. TM kw l-«»«l47n Ext T- »77. SATISFACTION QUARANTEEO. 1|l«^t-IM. 
SISIiordMll. FM. 

DRIVERS: $3(,im» yMdy, upti t.3a/M., AAA OjVMIWlly OTR Drivrn 'A C«Mf 
i3S,IXI(VYEAR INCOME pMHiM Hnd- tw Kom twy D-IZ dm, tM mdfcil, CoMpaiy 'A 1 EqulpiMiil 'A Hm 10 at 
hgBoota. TolliMl-IOMW-g77BExl. dmtH, ratnnwit. tlOMtup.teOOMMy HoMMuUb«itlMtt2Sa«l(oodMVR 
R■i^3tllllMtl^. fm. boma. AMigiwdlricM. HomdyTraotCil Mia SJdMOuliiii* Motor FraigM 

UMt«)i»4a-7gM. i'iee-;s»-3064iijii.4|iA 

atrWATOVnONTMl ACflGS-t21,l(». 

MMurahndMadltoiiMpdMnoiipdo- NATXMAl. PARKS HIRttG - SmmmI 4 DfllVERS-4MaKE»OTRAMMGi9rTiK- 

IM amnWd riw ovartuHq nloy 4 lul-lim offlptoymont t»«Uli « NMomI M-TnlvDdMniiMrRUnaid. RMiKlng 

llonolmi,yMprMolM0Mod.JuMaPHta.Fon«i(WUiioPiMMvw. Bm- iiid Job PkoWMM ONLY I WEEKENDS 

iiiloo MM ol WlKlMOlH, VA. UMMao, rim * bomm« Col: 1-20M4MIIM mt. orSWEEKSFUi-TME SD^pon'Ciioko 

pore Mintif. Buy lor HoolHii Midi op- N89732. Fo*. alVA. l-«l044(-2374. 

pnkil Pto.ipocWiMMilirn-llm- 

Mdm. Cdna*,30MK«ia. BE YOUR OWN BOSS. POMMotZEM PflASE THE LOROI SINQLES DATC 

pul-liinoSMnOMHlmomonNy.pnKM*- LINE 1-M)0-77S-2S60,El[l 130. t1.Mp« 
RIVER LOT M- AC -$15,900. $7gSDo«n in) inuronoo cUno lor IwoHKora pimtd- oMil+oiity/loudiMoonly. MooondM. 
- $197.47/Mo. Pom-Ma sMdng iMS nn. on. Inmlmoni ioi)ulrod. SoUmi* pw- SWio Cdy, Co. 213493-3308. 
wik 10 unopoM rtw - rata or M. On ditoo pbo compulor. Fkiondng ivalloMi. 

nownad. RaidylobuM,enporntiro. 1-100-722-SAMS. lot ond M MORTQAQES FAST. Any 

Cai now t-304-MM42a. Fki. 10 yn ot Ciidllralln« NoiftoMlooo. Eotypay- 

O.TSX ARM, t1l7.47/iiio. OAC. OdvonflMipofiwKodDoii'lpoyliauiaiido moM plono. Qraot rMoo. CoH Ckailaa 

lorCDLlroMng. AttondournMngcwiMi Towyota04-2K-06aior1-(004Z7-ago«. 
AUT)CNTX;LOGCABINIn1h*MouMoiM«Hdi«u«oMoodooVtoyinoiilon)Mp«yiDlCfl08SSTATEMORraAGE. 
on 110 ocm iiWi ulnl opringo, ooM- dadyelono. Coltoday. BUtOEflSTRANS- 

mlorpoiid,mQunlatio««oin.Door,tulioy POflT1-IOO-7(2-11ia EXT. LIZ. OfllVER$-Woolloril'96t16P«loiMI 

obwid. GroM 000000, novaurvoy. Own Comndonok and yauliw 2700 lo 3700 

llilomoaRWRUn|doalorS17I,goO-Un- POOL TABLES -Now 1099 Modob. Ai odMi WailooollK|roilpqr,l)oiHioaa. 
dartlOOWnH Loailtialrp«o«Haoop-lypaiaidolaa.8Ma,FaolDiydtagim6. taNlB,oMriiliMna,«)1Kan)inKli 
praMoMaivor«aaacta(. NodovakiMn Dtfcaiy iMl BoNp iMMila. QroM H- nam LEASE/nMCHASE PLAN AVAL, 
ploooal ColamarS404(2«10. oaodngl i|iM ate B«tfMa l-HMSt- Cal nool Ciniar Corp. t-IOO-242-t236, 

3471. aitA4. 

ABANOONB) HOMESITE. 31 ACRES - 

$40,000. QorgooMOinoliioodttnMtit- 101, Bulla, 1S7 Conmoicial Hodon Tun Hungry For Saocaao? Dovalop iMdy in- 
ooa. Laval, aadudadtrikipiing. On alaa Virginia BCIA Al Broad Salaa Dacaoibor oomo potoHo $6,000 monftly. iirilhin 12 
>o«d,i im aa, p adad. E»colonlllnonctig. 2nd- noon -aaiMtDiiDao«nter8ti->:30 inonda,dUtiullng»M,0(ganlcpradiicta. 
Onlyono. Cdno»S40-«12-S216. PH-BlacMonaForClWc^CoMBCl:Vlr- MuatbaarHagt) invest $150 1-000-027- 

glnloCaHoins«'sAaaoeMon64MtMOO(. 2SZ7Ea30B2. 
HAIL BOXES ETC. THE WORLD'S URQ- 

EST NETWORK OF FRANCHISED ATTN; EXPERIENCED TRUCK DRIVERS COOKWAHE. QORQHJUS NEW 17PC 
POSrAL.BU8INESSANDCOMMUWCA-DfllVETOOWMI$OOoMV7l«AU.ML£S. SUmCAL, STAMESSSTHL, WATER- 
TUNS SERVKE CBITERS IS EXPAM>- OwMTBl^) poaoUa to 11 nienta. Am. LES8SETI FIRST S CUSTOMERS RE- 
INQ. DISCOVER HOW YOU CAN QROW lOMOt Hm ln a nt i. Coavany Ori»iw CEWEfUSOOIOOTSTOCKPOTFREE 
WITHU8I 1-MNHW0414. NEWER EOUPHENT. CvifMn ft)! W/I>URCHASEIRETAIL$1I74,N0W12% 

Banaia. CH: NEW APPLE LMBI-IOO- OFFl,M0IH34-4t2|. 
PUBUCAUCnOMCOMHONWEALTH OF $434300 or1-10M(»43M HldMoo.a). AS^TEDLIWIG - MAr. Ucanaad Sii- 
VnONA SATIMDAV ■ DECEMBER 2. Uon.-Frl. 0-5 PM CaMraL CALUII panMoabrlMalMy.taRlOOOnBnOdy, 

IMS -tW AM STATE SURPLUS PROP- alMuakra. Bnm VA Locakxa. Stica 

ERTYWA<e«(aE11IODAR8YTOWNWEBUYHORT8AQES,TnalDaadl,An- 110<.AMERttANRETV«e(rHC«IES. 
ROAD, RICHMOND, VIRQWIA 1007 nuiMi, Uttarlaa. DM You Sal Your Prop- 1-<0O«fr«37. 
DOOOE PICKUP ' BOAT, I r arty? RacaMtg PiyMNT Why WaM 

QIASSMASTB) IWtt5>«> MERCURY QETCASHNOWINHton«a.lto«Pltoaa. SOUTHERN STEEL BUILDINQS • 
OUTSOARO- tlOHPMERCURYOBMO- CM I-00046MZ74 &d. M. 30>100KtO-IMS3:40>12iKlO-$14,441; 

TOR ■ 3-1MI BOAT TRAI^RS ' PARK- S0riS0Kl2-$10M7^0lkl17S«14-$27,47t; 

INQ10rSWEEPER,AOVANCEMACHINE DnVERaOTR..41«Oa|g»«iboma,nm HaiOOoll - $42,014; lOOiSOOnllM - 
m nenue.»».^..../vw.^~,~-, nnn inlnniiiHw<.|paM l iiifc . liiii $06,071. Oaalon oanlad. No doolar faa. 
AMERCANOPTICAL.0NEFIFTY'PA6-pn|raiii. &n V IP » OMopar mda. CdbrBnicliinfQuolo IOO«l-7232. 
ERS'TWOWAYRAOnB-PEXTOMETAL SkidaiM MfeBMl CriM taMmtfonaL 

ROtIER,3l1D-GRMDra'QAROe«n»4S0-TEAM,nel^«»-«0a». loooaipanMa BaaidorL S.C. • Spactaou- 

TUS)-4000t&CHAMHOBr*wai». lar, dodi-approyad, witarlront and 

MAmUETTE IN AMP, NO CA&ES ' ORNBI-yOUOGSSIVETHEBESTIONLY aaaMoMllOMaMalmiiaMO SoOn- 
LARQEQUANinYOFtlHnMOVIEFUn 4t MONTHS EXPOIBICE. LONQHAUL- niat pool Hw* oovL aanl On Mor- 
' van • OVEHCAO PRCUECTORS ■ MBOWWEEK AVBIAK, 2S00 MLES/ oomM aoMiaay, ovtrtooMg AduVc 
FAX MAOINE. NEC 411 • COMPLETE WEO. EXOaLBTT BBCFITS QBCR- Oooan. yal minuMa horn IMonc do«m- 
SET BCYOjOPaXA, 1M1 BXT10N * OUS BONUS PROORAMS. BUAINQTON low. 1-MMt7-0770. SaaMouolRaoly. 
DtSPUY CASE -VAiBOUS COPIERS -MOTOR CARRIERS. I-IOO^IOMBHC. 

D£8K'CHAIR8.VARB0S'TYPEWRfT- EOE. ' ' ■ """ 

Eltt-FUCA8INETS*EXAMTASLfiS- AnyCradilRaang'CaahlorHainooainoii 

MUCK MUCH MORE. IH ITaiS SUB- DRIVERS -CON-WAY TRUOaOADSER- 'No Ei|ulyPi«vaaa-Lowaelfla«a- No 
JECTTOCHANQEIHFORAa)mONALVKXSTHEBESTWAYToppay,coavany UpFnMFoaa'LooalCo.-UntadSouli- 
MFORMATKM CONTACT STATE SUR- paid bsnaSh, 2900 oMMNlt aMMi, am MaMfaga ' Cal Nalaon M-I004S4- 
PLUSFnOPEHTY (904) 2394199. and 1009 FiaWdiian. Cal 1-ig»4Se- H99. 

CWrS(2997). CWTIaanE^OppailH- 
aEXI. GMysvMiliSclioal^ulvalMicynilyEiqiloyw. 8ERMCE THM9CMNS - TocMckia 

Olploiiata4aaaliiBMiouroMylDMow aaadrtfcaawle aco aaiiarc lo lhodaqtiip- 

Hoiia8M|FCOHiM.Qd1-99M4MS90. DRIVERS -Top poyooMatoa. P« lor aait h «a RUMond orao Ejpwianio 
o »padoiaa. 3 talooa tH yair. Dowiioa. idli (oa, olocMcal. and ralrigortiion n- 
AaaaiMa Am. Cralfe aad loyi in your kamlh,|WlMadng,pMiodonalga.Oltel fdnd. Fultanalls. I-M0490-5949 
■pan taa. Ate aaning Mwg and con- dapoall. Aaalgnad aqolp. you Mia Mm. 

pMaranrk Qraalpay. NotNcall-OOO- QradaMkonal 22 an yr. OTRiCOl 'A*. STER BUUXNO SALED SAVE SO%ll 
9324007. MoCloadO* 14904134990 &lE8-t1. STRAIOHTWAa OR QUONSET . Naad 

lakopT 90al0... J47t«il0: My Slongo? 
Naad OHoaSpaooT Wo doalgn and bu9d HAROLD IVES TmCMNQIMi(MaM. 4Me...4tra7AI 09iartavaltM SE- 
lonolcky««lioaworbMlnoaoanMM!-FiMOr«MrTraMng...lyou*Bl%, At- RHUS CMIS ONLYll PKMEER 1-000- 
M«. HodaMr9i12lol4i40. BOCAdMdiaoiooM. Eiipariw»payivMlB(4744259. 
Appigvad. SM ar compMol Haiowar par Ma. riaiiliiH taiialM: 1400442- 

Cuaan Buldan 1400-3394712. 0163. ABSOLUTE STEAL 2« AC ton $09.32/ 

Bio.'PlI, MlnutaoaChao. Boy Baouti- 
QOTACAMPGROUNDMEUBEf^llPOfl DRIVERS EXPERIENCED OR WCXPERh M^ aoodad in clanilii| ooaaW saHng. 
TIIESHARETWEUTAKEIT AMBUCA'S ENCEDNortiAmaronVanLlnaacum* Ro^bMMonitaMid. IndudesoMi- 

"fnrrffltnifr "in ""'~""irr iHwlMnHlnnMMMMBllliiiM.lidiVto $t2,990Aa|aMMat709%Mwi1iiad1S 
MFORMATKMTOU FREE HOTLINE l-PieducMiMMMWIvDMon. Tit- yaan.3yaarbalonand20%d0on.OAC 
I0M2M997. aiai4aa MM^I TiMH puMaaa pro- LJaiMknooMr TlwymntlaalalOMaa 

gnaa. no talor »N9Mawi;i anaaaa, pdoaa. Cilaoa1400'77M693.o«ll54t. 
SUNQUESTWOLFFTAWUNGBBJSCon- PayHrPartomMaptaaaMMuAaaiM 
nSRlaHtaa Unlh Fran $<N Buy Fad- 140ft9«4t47 DipL Ml. 






CASH FOR PROPERTIES 

Wc arc looking to buy, sell or trade 
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? f^MMklf Please call Joe Wilkcy at 456-2345 or 
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10 Vimna MtA^m, RiAnr. December 1. 1995 









Young beauties shine 

The Future Miss America Pageant was recently held at the Vir^nia 
Beach Pavilion with girls from all over Hampton Roads competing in 
several age categories. I^iss Virg'nia Amber Medlin served as mistress of 
ceremonies. KemJra Danielle Varney, 3, was crowned Uttle Miss Virgnia 
Beach. Kessica Cohen, 6, was crowned Little Miss America. Jennifer 
Bell, 11, was crowned Pre-T%n Miss America. Melissa Br^dby, 13, was 
crowned Tem Mis America and named Most Photogenic. Scenes from 
the evening, dockwfse top from left, included: Medlin posing for a 
memorable picture virith Jennifer Bell, April Bell (talent winner) and 
Marissa Uwrence (talent winner); Prc-Teen Miss America and the 
runners-up; Cohen wowing the audience with her singing ability! Vamey 
holding her winner's roses; Utde Miss America smiling Jubilantiy; and, 
Teen Miss America posing with her court 






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! 



The WrgmH^Bii^^h Sun 



u- 



■IRGINIA BEACti r-f/ZS and VIEWS 



Condemnation is a 
tougli sell at the Beach 



ByLEECAHILL 
Cfty Ckiuncjl Rsportsr 

City council has deferred fw 
another week, until next 
Tuesday, inclusion of a proposal 
for condemnation powers for 
economic development in its 
legislative package. 

As some council members at 
a work session Tuesday ques- 
tioned whether the proposed or- 
dinances had enough safeguards 
for property owners, Mayor 
Mayera Obemdorf observed that 
"condemnation in the city of 
Virginia Beach doesn't roll out 
easily." 

The big "C" word isn't easy 
for the black community espe- 
cially, according to George 
Minns, president of the Virginia 
Beach chapter of the NAACP 
(National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored Peo- 
ple). 

Minns, speaking at a public 
hearing on the Legislative Pack- 
age, said that the NAACP op- 
posed condenuiation powers for 
economic development years 

The big "C" 

word isn't easy 

for the black 

community 

especially, 

according to 

George Minns, 

president of the 

Beach chapter 

of the NAACP. 



ago and "defeated it in Rich- 
mond," and would oppose giviag. 
the coAncil that authority now. 

He said that the people who 
would be most affected by con- 
demnation would be black prop- 
erty owners because, since they 
were less affluent than whites, 
they would be more likely to 
have the dilapidated property 
that would qualify for condenuia- 
ti(Mi. 

City Attorney Leslie Lilley, 
at the direction of council, had 
prepared three versions of the 
ordinance for council to submit 
to the General Assembly for 
consideration. 

Council members least in- 
clined to support condemnation 
leaned toward the version which 
restricted exercise of condemna- 
tion powers to blighted areas 
"where there is growing or total 
lack of proper utilization caused 
by the condition of land titles or 



layout and dilapidated and sub- 
standard housing and inadequate 
sanitary facilities resulting in the 
stagnant and unproductive condi- 
tion of land." 

Minns said that the 
ordinance was "written with an 
eye pointed at the black 
community (because black- 
owned land more commonly 
falls in that category)." 

He said that the ordinance 
would violate die Constitution 
because "in purpose and effect" 
it grants special rights to one 
community — the ordinance re- 
quests the condemnation powers 
for cities of over 350,000 popula- 
tion. Minns said that 90 percent 
of the cities in the state are ex- 
cluded since the only city of 
over 350,000 population is Vir- 
ginia Beach. 

It's a special law, he said, 
and "is a violation of our rights. 
Economic Development has not 
been fair to us in the black 
community.. .land owners in the 
black community have received 
questionable treatment." 

When condemnation author- 
ity for economic development 
was considered previously, the 
black community objected 
strenuously, tracing their fears to 
the condemnation powers of the 
Norfolk Redevelopment and 
Housing Authority which dis- 
placed much of the black com- 
munity. 

It's because Virginia Beach 
doesn't have a housing authority, 
and council members say they 
don't want one, that they are 
turning to condemnation author-^ 
ity for Virginia Beach City 
Council for economic develop- 
ment. Council already has the 
power of condemnation for pub- 
lic safety and health, but runs 
into problems when it tiws to-pirt- 
togedier parcels of land for eco- 
nomic development. 

The immediate concern is 
the proposed Airport Industrial 
Park which would be located on 
property in the historically — 
black community of Burton 
Station next door to the 
Regional Airp(Ht in Norfolk. 

Since June of 1991 the city 
has b^n working with residents 
there in attempts to purchase the 
property. Although most of the 
community was willing to sell 
their property, the city ran into 
snags mostly because of the dif- 
ficulty in clearing titles on the 
property. The city could accom- 
plish this through condemnation 
and at least some council mem- 
bers were interested in condem- 
nation power only to clear titles. 

□Sm condemnation, Pag* 10 



Ag Reserve Program 
finally in place here 



By LEE CAHILL 
City CouncH Reporter 

The city's Agricultural Reserve 
Program (ARP), which has brea- 
tiied new life into efforts to pre- 
serve agriculture as a city re- 
source, is ready to take off. 

Staff members at « Virginia 
Beach City Council workshop 
Tuesday projected the purchase 
by the city of $57 million in deve- 
lopment rights from agricultural 
property owners through the year 
%11. 

The program was presented as 
a winner for all concerned — for 
the farmer who will r^eive pay- 
i^nts over a 25-year i»riod plus 
the full purchase price for the de- 
velc^nwnt rights at the end of the 
25 years, and for the city which 
would be saved the expense of 
iwtting infrastructure in the soudi- 
em/agricultural portion of the city. 

The object of the program is to 
compensate property owners wIk) 
continue to farm their land al- 
though they could make more 
mcNiey by <fevelq)ing tte i»t^rty 
cff selling it to developers. 

Under the program, the city 
will purehase development rightt, 
ttat is, die city will pay the far- 
mer a certain amount of nK>i»y, 
not to quit farming. The program 
is conpletely voluntary. 

In die first year of the program, 
fiscal 1996, the city would pur- 
cttt% SIS million in ^tytsXs^meu. 



rights. It will do this by purchas- 
ing zero coupon bonds with a face 
value totaling $15 million for $2.9 
million. The property owners will 
receive the bonds, then worth 
their face value, at the end of 25 
years. 

In the meantime, the city will 
I»y directly to the fanner the in- 
terest on Uie bond — about six 
percent of the purchase price 
which is the current prevailing 
rate on freasury bonds or whatever 
is the prevailing rate at the lime 
of the purchase. 

One of the beauties of the pro- 
position, said Deputy City Attor- 
ney William N. Macali, is that 
the interest payment will not be 
taxd)le, alt^ragh at the end of 
the 25 years, the property owner 
will have to pay interest on die 
balloon payment. Under the in- 
lOidlii^nt purchase agreen^nt the 
city will have with the projraly 
owittr, the city will i^^ive a pe- 
petual easen^nt over the ivopaty 
pohibiting all uses but agricul- 
tue. 

City Finance Dir^tor Patricia 
I%illil» said that the full faidi ud 
credit of die city will be behind 
tte boMls wMch will have die ad- 
ditional enhancement that they 
will be meA fw a {mblic purpose. 

Macali said that the ci^ can 
get tte special tax relief from the 

ate«AQ,h||»lO 



Visions of a Sugar Plum tioiiday 



Youngsters view 
sweet fantasy 
with wonder 

By M.J.KNOBLOCK 
Sun Correspondent 

Four- year-old Nisa Rraan 
walked around the gingerbread 
village with her eyes as big as 
saucers. The top of her head 
barely reached above the rooftqis 
of die houses — real gingerbrewl 
adorned with white icing and 
candy for decorations — as they 
sat (m a cottony, "snow-laden" 
blanket. 

Above the houses loomed a 
Christmas tree full of lights. 

A choo-choo train ran around 
the village, and Rman jumped 
back, spooked and giggling, as 
the train pulled out from under a 
snowy tunnel. 

She was just one of many chil- 
dren who attended the Fourth 
Annual Sugar Plum Gingerbread 
Festival held last weekoid at the 
Virginia Beach Pavilioi. 

"We basically have two reasons 




PhalMbyMJ.KnaM>ck 

CAN I TASTC IT? Nisa Rman, 4, checks out the gingerbread 
village on display at the Virginia Beach Pavilion daring 
Children's Itay, part of the Snpr Mwn Gingerbread Festival held 
last weekend. 



we do the festival," said Susan 
McRee, chairman of the Sugar 
Plum Bakery Gingerbread 
Festival. 

"One is for the bakery. Even 
though our business is currently 
increasing, we're bringing in 




GOOD ENOUGH TO EAT. A gingerbread village of nearly 200 
houses was the main attraction doring the Sigar Plam 
Gingerbread Festival held last weekend at the Pavilion. The 
hoDses were decorated by dilldren at five of the city's creatton 
centers and will be on display throogb Dec. 17. 



more disabled, they are paid 
salaries just like anybody else. 
This is a fund raiser — and also 
as an outreach to the community, 
because they have been very kind 
to die Sugar Plum Bakery over 
die years." 

Kids Day, which last year 
drew more than 1,0(X) youngstCTS 
and parents, included several 
activities fw children. 

Among thoscf was the chance 
to decorate a gingerbread house, 
just like die 200 on display in 
die gingerbread village created by 
children at five of die area recre- 
ation centers. 

The gingerbread is baked by die 
Sugar Plum BakCTy, a non-profit 
organization Uiat employs dis- 
abled individuals. 

The houses are "glued" together 
widi icing and are allowed to dry 

before die children add finishing 
touches, such as peppermint win- 
-»dBWwnd licorice trim. 

"Hie children and their ginger- 
bread houses — they're each one 
so unique and diey're so creative," 
said Deborah Marshall, executive 
director of Sugar Plum Inc. "That 
has to be die highlight." 

Marshall said diat die bakery 
has been planning for die festiv^ 
all year long, and began baking 
gingerbread in November. 

In addition to houses, children 
could also decorate a gingerbread 
man to snack on or take home. 
There was also a face painting 
and a children's shopping comer, 
with gift items donated by Lillian 
Vemon Inc. 

A special treat for children diis 
year was a trolley ride from die 
Pavilion to die Virginia Beach 
Visitor's Center, where Santa 
Claus hosted a luncheon. 

After lunch, children climbed 

DSoe VISIONS, Pago 10 



A ripple in calm waters? 



By LEE CAHILL 
City Council Reporter 

Maybe somebody talked too 
soon. 

But Virginia Beach City CouiKnl, 
which had been touted during die 
previous day or two as being 
harmonious — the most 
harmonious council in years — 
didn't sound diat way during a w(Hk 
session last week. 

That's when councilman John A. 
Baum questioned die pro[»iety of a 
single council member — Robert 
K. Dean — calling a "public 
hearing" and expecting support 
from the city staff. 

"1 don't think the city has the 
responsibility for a public hearing," 
he said. Not Uiis kind. 

Calling die town -meeting-type 
sessions held by Dean and odier 
council members (Louisa Strayhom 
has them regularly). "Public 
hearings' may send the wrong 
message to the public," said 
councilman W.W. Harrison Fr. 
People expect council members to 
be present st official public 
hearings so that they will hear the 
id^s of tte people, but, he ^d, he 
does not (&t\ thtt he is obIigat«i to 
attend a meeting called by one 
(xmncil member. 

The people may get the wrong 
idea from his non-attendance, he 

Dean appeared sh(K;ked and 
an^red over die furor. He said ditt 
l» h^ bem ffxthright and 0pm, He 



said that he could change the 
terminology from "public hearing" 
to something else, like public 
meeting, but His meeting was for 
the people from his borough. 
Princess Anne, aidiough, he said, 
anybody was welcome to come. 

Dean had written letters to civic 
Iragues in the borough inviting 
citizens to attend "public hearings" 
starting at 7 p.m. at the Princess 
Anne Recreation Center at the 
cmner of General BooUi Boulevard 
and Ferrell Parkway on Dec. 6, Jan. 
3, Feb. 7. March 6, April 3 and 
May 3. 

The subject was the 
Comprehensive Plan. His letter 
^ted that the plan addresses 
physical development poblems and 
needs of ail areas of die city and 
that since Princess Anne Borough 
was "poised for tremendous 
^owth," he want»l input from die 
pe(^le. 

ENean sent cqines of die letw to 
council membas, inviting them u> 
attend and also wrote to City 
Ntimager James K. qmre requesting 
him to ivovide a safT member at 
the meetings widi current zoning, 
miaw soeet and highway and Iwd 
mt maps. He also asked for an 
easel with a newsprint tablet fw 
notes. 

Dean slid dial he was aware that 
other council members have 
meetings and staff is r^uired to be 
present 

"I'm taken b«:k widi this whole 



issue. 

Vice Mayor William D. Sessoms 
Jr., who presided over the session 
in the absence of Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf, in an attempt to smoodi 
over the situation said diat council 
did not expect Dean to cancel the 
meetings, but diat it was a question 
of furnishing staff. 

Councilwoman Nancy I^ilcer said 
that she didn't have a problem with 
Dean's meetings. Harrison said that 
he just did not want to be criticized 
for not being there. 

Sessoms said that he was 
concerned about the duplication. He 
pointed out that the Planning 
Commission and city council will 
bodi have public hearings on die 
comprehensive plan. He suggested 
that maybe the terminology of 
Dean's, the public hearing part, is 
wrong. 

Stfayhom, who was not present 
at the session, said Dean, has staff 
at her meetings. 

Councilman Louis R. Jones ^id 
that he felt tte same as Harrism. 

Harrison said that perhaps it 
should be m^e clear at die out^t 
that Dean's meetings are not public 
hearings. 

Councilman Harold Heischober 
said that E^n is having a series of 
m^ungs and is ^heduling them lo 
cover segments of the 
comprehensive plan in Princess 
Anne County. "Ife is doing his job 

OSooA,ftigolO 




35 Cent' 



Sheriff wants 
funding for 
youth facility 

ByLEECAHILL 
(^ Council Rapoiter 

When the city presents its requests 
to the General Assembly diis year. 
Sheriff Frank Drew reminded, don't 
fwget funding for die Juvenile De- 
tention Facility. 

During a pu- 
|>Uc hearing on 
the city's legis- 
lative package, 
tlK list of re- 
j quests diat will 
be presented to 
the 1996 Gen- 
ital Assembly, 
Ehew said that 
I flie city is pro- 
ic^eding with the 
Drew design of a 
juvenile detention facility, but if the 
matching funds from tte state are not 
provided this year, the city will have 
to wait two years to go ahead widi die 
project 

He told council dut the city has 
gotten to diat point it feared two years 
ago. He said diat dangerous juve- 
niles, who had been held in die jail, 
can no longo- be held diere in the jail 
in Virginia Beach because of state 
guidelines. As a result, die city had to 
house one 14-year-old juvenile in a 
jail in Bath County. He said diat tlw 
only juveniles that can be held at the 
jail no w are those who are certified as 
adults. 

"I fear die 60-day session will be 
over and we will have no backing," 
said Drew. 

Drew also said diat if the General 
Assembly grants the request of die 
city to add a high constable position, 
and the sheriff or his designate is 
appointed constable, it would not cosx 
die city anydiing. The SherifTs Of- 
fice is ah-eady doing the job now, he 
said. The only advantage is die money. 

Hie city eliminated die high con- 
stable job some years ago but while 
die fees collectaJ by the high con- 
stable for serving warrants, summons 
and notices in civil cases before tte 
General District Court went to the 
city, the fees collected by the sheriff 
for die same services go to die state. 
With the constable's office in place, 
die city would again receive the fees. 

The city council adopted die le- 
gislative package presented to coun- 
cil Tuesday except for die request for 
condemnation audiorityfcM- economic 
development which will be consid- 
ered iKxt TiMsday. 

Lou I^ce of Hunt Qub Forest said 
diat he was against condemnaticm, 
and didn't see much point in retain- 
ing die requirement that schools not 
open until after Labof Day because 
nwst of the students who work at 
resorts are college students — col- 
leges are not affected by the require- 
ment The post Labor Day opening is 
intended to help tourism as well as to 
provide jobs for students. 

He said he also did not like die 
request diat bonds be required for the 
repair or constiuction of additional 
bulkheads in Sandbridge to avoid 
having public hazards on die beach. 
Pace said diat it smacked too much of 
"big brodier." 



Free smoke 
detectors to 
citizens Sat. 

Free smoke detectors and batteries 
will be given away to citizens 
living in the Colony and Seaside 
Trailer Parks, located in die 100 
block of Virginia Beach Boulevaiti, 
on Saturday, Dec. 9. 

Operation Smoke Detects, a 
joint pn^nun of die Virginia Beadi 
Fire Dei»itment uid die Kiwanis 
Clul» of Virginia Beach wd the 
Virginia Beach Department of 
Housing and Neighborhood 
Preservation, have teamed up \o 
provicte this important saf^y ux4 
to lho% in iwed. 

Firefighters will go (kxff to (kwr 
asking permission to test tteir 
smoke deaector, if it does not w«k. 
dwy will replace die batteries, umI 
if there is no detects at all, d»y 
will install one free of charge. 
Residenu only need to post the 
nMice (xittitk their docw which wiU 
lei firefightras know diey want » 
pirtKipate in Uk pn^run. 



/ 



mmm^it^mm 



^f^mrmm 



iwva^M 



2 Virginia Beach Sun. Friday, Decemberl^ 199S 



Commentary 



Our Community Heroes 

A Community Hero could be the woman next 
door who runs a soup kitchen for the 
homefess or the gentleman down the street 
who does all he csm to help the environment. 
It could be a school volunteer who devotes 
hundreds of hours to making children's 
education more memorable. 

Ordinary people, extraordinary acts. These 
are Hampton Roads' Community Heroes. If 
you know someone who stirs this image In 
your mind, why not do something for them? 
There's still time to nominate yourself or 
another Community Hero to carry the 
Olympic flame in next year's Olympic Torch 
Relay. 

In response to requests for additional time to 
complete nominations, the United Way of 
South Hampton Roads has extended the 
deadline to Dec. 15 for people to apply for the 
'Community Hero" torchbearer program. The 
Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games Is 
seeking 5.500 people nationwide whose 
service to others and their community sheds 
the light of love and hope on other Americans. 

Mirroring the spirit of the Olympic Games, a 
Community Hero Is someone who: 

■ Performs outstanding volunteer work; 

■ Serves as a community leader, role model 
or mentor: 

■ Performs acts of generosity or kindness; 
or, 

■ Performs extraordinary feats or 
accomplishments. 

Nominating a resident of Hampton Roads for , 
this once-in-a-lifetlme honor is simple. Either 
call the United Way anytime at 629-0500, ext. 
190 (leave name and address), or pick up a 
form at the United Way office at 100 Main St. 
in Norfolk. Entries can also be submitted via 
the Internet at :hht//. atlanta.olymplc.org. 

Community Heroes will be announced in 
February, so get those applications In and 
help the Olympic flame burn brightly In 
Hampton Roads. — V.E.H. 




Off The 
Cuff 

By Victoria 
Heckt, editor 



Just when we weren't looking, a 
whole year slipped by on Evan and 
me. Lo and behold, here we are on the 
threshold of our first anniversary 
cone Dec. 10. 
Now that we've almost made it 
through the 
proverbial 
first year of 
"wedded 
bliss," I 
think the oc- 
casicm calls 
for retro- 
spective of 
lessons lear- 
ned since I 
took that 
walk down 
the aisle into 
the woridof 
wifedom. 

There 

were many 

"firsts" in the 

-' year — some 

I would love 

to repeat and, well, others I'd frankly 

just as soon forget 

I guess the first thing I had to get 
used lo was my mate'ssleeping habits, 
as many a young wife must For some, 
I imagine, the transition must be easy 
if their husband is a good sleeper who 
passes the night quietly. 

I, on the other hand, married a 
fellow who is cither sawing logs on 
his side of the bed or has a snore like 
a frcighi train rolling into the depot. 
Evan, hks.% him, enjoys his snoo7.ing 
— and heartily! Far be it for me lo 
disturb him as I sigh and pull the 
pillow further over my head. Such is 
the burden of a wife, as I watched my 
mcMher deal with the same dilemma 
for years. Perhaps, I figure, it is a 
tradition [»ssed from generation. If 
so, I'd just as soon let it skip one. 

Second, I l^med that man and 
woman are not created equal: around 
the house, that is. 

I learned that lesson as soon as we 
got back from ow London 
horeym(K)n and Evan dropped the 
luggage on the floor, pnmouncing it 
was time for me to mpesk. 

Guess the honeymoon nMlly wm 
over! 

Honestly, I have learned that 
Iwusework isindt^awwntti'^wt^ 
(despite claims that we are 
"liber^d"), aldKN^ sMnetimes I 
pry Evsi's butt (rfT the moA kkig 
eiKM^ ftt-him tonmalo^^ckxhes 
«' swipe die vtcuimi aoroB die nig. 
Heck, im ot^aMMOy coda m 
hUm^ m^ if I'm tacky! WeU, 
imybe I'm iM m lucky afto' all. 
Btiip! Jutt jcAing, swe^w. 
lUdtltaned^focAaUseawn 



(orbaKball.a-basketball.orsocco'...) 
is IK) time to try and take the remote 
control away from the man of the 
houK. 

This, I know, is a battle I'll never 
win considering I married the original 
armchair quarterback. God love him, 
I could prance acrt^s the den naked 
except for a slinky negligee and he'd 
say I was blocking his view 

And if the University of Virginia is 
playing? Heck, I might as well bag it 
all and go shopping, because he 
wouldn't notice if I came bsck into 
the house with a hundred sho{^ing 
bags anyway. (Hey, maybe this sports 
thing has its advantages after all!) 

Fourth, I learned that once I was 
married there simply wasn't enough 
time in the day to get everything 
accomplished that I'd like. 

Between cooking, housework and 
a job (double time required for the 
first two since now it's two rf us), 
that last hour of peace before going to 
bed is cherished for [minting the 
fingernails, savoring a good novd a 
watching Bubba, my favorite stud on 
"In the Heat of the Night" 

Finally, 1 learned that a whole lot 
of planning goes into the one day 
that's supposed to be the most 
memorable in a young woman's life 
— her wedding day — md yet it 
passes in the blink if an eye. 

I could wax poetk here and talk 
about how quickly tte days fly. 
Instead, I'm going to be practical aid 
down to earth about it 

Yes, a wedding day is all it's 
cracked up to be with the flowers, the 
gown, the groom and all your friends 
and loved ones in attoidimce. This 
memory I will cherish forever mid 
reliwmieweachtimel thumb through 
tl« wedding album. 

But, in the time spent trying on 
silks ^ satins and pre{»ring for that 
one day , young brides forget a certain 
sjmelhing: that there is life after the 
we(kling. 

That life is called a marriage, the 
mc^ sacwi bmd betweoi people 
that God estaWislMd. Too often we 
f(^t tfiat, ato the rice las beoi 
thrown and the last (aJ« s»ved, tfioe 
is a year, 10 ye»s, % yon to ga. 
And y^tN^se filled wiAdiegood, 
die 1^ and the ugly. 

Ron dK»e fii» heady ibys <m tfK 
tKxi^nm»a (for Evm nd I ow fnt 
bip tei^^) 10 te Ikde howiKM 
(fisi»ss(die(fidiwa^ero^^ftnnm 
widi swb im^^JMdy V^i lo 
mind), I iefl«s on ilM pM ^r wift 
joy md woidenMM. 

For soiMOiK iiten I Ao^ I 
kiwwevetyAir^rixnt— coMder^ 

OtM n^L^miMS, Page 3 



GOOD LUCK 
IN BOSNIA. 
DONT DO 
ANVrUINQ 
iVIOULDNT 
DO. 




I'M 
ALREADy 

Doim 

SOMETHIMa 

VOU 
WOULDNT 

DO. 



sm 




In search of the last (?) great fruitcake 




Reflections on a year of 
living, loving, learning 



Commonwealth 
Commentary 

By Ray Gar- 
land, columnist 



Like an aging tenor who k^ps 
making"farewcir' appearances, I kcl 
the urge for one more great fruitcake 
contest. 

Here's the way it works: I share a 
recipe that has been evolving in my 
family for more than 50 years and ask 
you to share a Christmas memory 
precious to you or your family. Those 
selected for 
publication 
will win a 
fruitcake. 

When Uie 

first contest 

was held in 

1988. a 

reader in 

Laurel Fwk 

kindly sent a 

clipping 

about an 

American 

Express poll 

' that claimed 

fruitcake 

was the 

"worst" holiday gift. Iftnie.itmay be 

diat most people make their cakes too 

sweet. 

Our object here is to produce a 
cake in which many fresh and natural 
flavors present themselves in perfect 
harmony, not masked by sugar. 

Past readers will note that in 
addition to some minor changes, I'm 
adjusting the recipe for a more 
reasonable outputof five three-pound 
cakes, using standard meat-loaf pans. 
Here's your shopping list 
4 cups plain bread flour 
4 tbsps. ground nutmeg 
4 tbsps. ground allspice 
1 lb. butter 

1 l.b. light brown sugar 
12 large eggs 
1 lb. dark raisins 
1 lb. lighlxaisins 
1 lb. figs, cut in pieces 
1 lb. chopped dates 
1 lb. candied fruit rind, mixed 
colors 

1 lb. dried pineapple, cut in 
pkces 

1 lb. broken English walnuts 
1 lb. broken pecans 
16 oz. orange marmalade 
2 cups prune juice 
2 cufK ruby pat 
After assembling your ingredients. 



no small chore, let the raisins, figs 
and dates soak ov^night in die prune 
juice and port wine. 

Next day, sift flour, nutmeg and 
allspice (spices must be fresh) into 
your largest pan, preferably the 
bottom half of a roaster. Sift again 
just to be sure, dien dump in the 
walnuts and pecans, turning diem 
over undl well coated widi flour and 
spices. 

In a separate bowl, working widi 
softened butter, "cream" or blend in 
the brown sugar. Using two odio' 
bowls, separate die yolks from die 
whites of die eggs. Blend yolks widi 
butter/sugar mix and add to the 
"floured" nuts in large pan. Beat die 
whites into frodiy "peaks" and set 
aside. 

Here is the messy, fun part. With 
hands clad in rubber gloves, dump 
the fruit dtat has been soaking, along 
widi any liquid not absorbed, into the 
batler^ut mix, adding the colored 
fruit rind and dried pineapple diat 
wasn't soaked. 

Then .meld dioroughly. adding die 
marmalade. Cookbooks will tell j^u 
to "fold" in die beaten whites. But 
widi batter diis heavy, you have to 
cream die stuff in wherever you can 
and not worry about it 

Now for a chore I always hated 
which wife Jane has mncifully taken 
ovCT and done so much more neady: 
lining die taking pans widi heavy 
brown paper. For meat-loaf pans, cut 
pieces measuring 10 inches by 14 
from old grocery bags, greasing one 
side with butt«'. 

Using scissors and fing»^, crease 
die paper into die bottom of your 
pans, leaving some hanging over die 
sides to lift die cakes out 

Scooping peat globs of die stuff 
widi your still -gloved hands, fill the 
pans, patting down and rounding off 
\ess dian an inch from die vop. If 
exhausted , let yourcakes sit overnight 
in a cool place and dream of cooking 
diem by die dawn's early light I do. 
Recipes I've collected over die 
years give mmy differait baking 
instructions; some fmMy absurd. 
And ovens do vary. Trial and painful 
error has convinced me diat for cakes 
this size, an oven [»e-heaied to ZIS 
degrees is best, widi die t»nperature 
reduced 25 degrees every 45 minutes. 



After diree hours, turn oven off and 
leave cakes in undl lukewarm. 

Unless you have a modern 
convection oven, taking will be best 
done widi cakes on die middle rack 
(Mdy , which may require tvra sessions. 
Using bodi racks is fine if you move 
die cakes tack to front and tqi to 
bottom every 45 minutes. Biggo' 
cakes will take longer, (rf course, but 
I would sdll favor m(xe moderate 
temperatures. 

The object of our desire is a cake 
widi a rich brown color, firm not hard 
to the touch. Add moisture to die 
baking by placing some pent wine in 
a small pan at die bottom of die oven. 

When cakes are cool, lift diem out 
by the brown pap^, which stays widi 
the cake, and store diem in a closed 
container widi a few pieces of qiple 
and a small cup of spirits. While 
cakes dius stored are good for many 
weeks, diey 're neverbetlerdian eaten 
warm from die oven. 

Longer storage requires wrapping 
widi cheesecloth so^ed in brandy, 
but people don't seem to go in for 
heirloom fruitcakes today, which is 
just as well. 

Winning a caice 

It if all seems too much, send me a 
memory of Christmaspastdiat'sdear 
to you, or a tradition unique to your 
family. To get you in the mood, let 
me share one (tf many wmiderful 
entries in die first great fruitcake 
contest that seems iq^ropriate. 

A lady recalled a Christmas 
package sent to her fadie^, stationed 
in England during Wo-ld War II. 
When the postman tanded over the 
parcel he shook his head sadly, "I'm 
afraid your botde is tsoken." It wasn't 
of course, only a fruitcsdce from 
grandmother liberally "anointed" 
with brandy for its long voyage in a 
woflA at war. 

Share your Christmas manoiy widi 
me at Route 1, Box 103. Goode. Va. 
24556. If you don't wbi one of our 
cakes.at least we'll have your address 
to return a greeting. All entrira subject 
to editing and publication in 23 
Virginia newspapers. Enjoy. 

Ray Garland, a former member of 
the VirginiaassefrAly,isasyndicated 
columnist. 




The Real 
World 

By B.J. Ses- 
sions, senior col- 
umnist. 



Liberal thinking 
could lead J^ 
OUT downfall 

No mma how hard I try. it is ' 
difficub f(»- me to understand die 
thinking diat is behind die liberaliffii 
diat exists in dus country today. 

I am dioroughly cfflivinced dut 
liberals have contributed mwe ^- 
nificandy to die{m}blans in Amoica 
dian any odier group. Tliey s«an to 
have die phi]oso{Ay that no me 
should be 
held respon- 
sible fw their 
actirais.They 
want us all to 
be grouped 
together as 
one without 
regard to our 
individual 
differences, 
such as 
intelligence, 
religious be- 
liefs, am- 
bitions and 
other traits 
dat up undl 

now have 

" made Amer- 
ica great 
They seem to want to teach die 
whole world to sing in perfect har- 
mony. It doesn't mattw whedier you 
work for a living or fight for your 
country as long as you sing in perfect 
harmony widi die rest of die world 
(which does not dunk as much of us 
as we do ourselves). 

They seem to feel diat if someone 
else has a case of hemorrhoids, than 
we should all get them so diat the 
poor soul who has them won't suffer 
alone. 

For example, they discourage 
excellence in school because it makes 
diose who can't learn as fast feel tad. 
They want all school children to dress 
alike so diat diey won't feel bad and 
steal from each otho^. If someone 
works hard and ^cumulates a litde 
security, diat is tad because di«e are 
odiers who don't have any. So, diey 
take fioom diose who do work and 
give it to diose who don't wcvk. 

Most liberals oppose the deadi 
penalty and suppcvt laws that protect 
dk criminal and ignore die victim. 
They feel diat die govonment shouki 
take care of all dieir needs stifling die 
initiative of diose who want to make 
dieir own way. Hiey have attempted 
to take God out of die schods and 
Christ out <rf Christmas. They are 
rewriting history so diat it fits into 
dieir scheme of tilings. They want to 
take die guns away from law abiding 
citizens and put diem at the mercy of 
criminals who do tave guns. liberals 
want to feed, clrthe and police die 
WOTld when we have hundreds of 
tltousands in this country who are 
homeless, sick and hungry widi many 
dying from aids, cancer, drug addic- 
tion and odier dreadfiil maladi^.. 

The schools are overcrowded, die 
air and water are polhited, die roads 
and hi^ways are a disaster. Young ^ 
teen-age girls are having one b^y 
after anodier and gangs are running 
rampant in die large cities, burning, 
murdering and looting as diey pl^se. 
If die liberals had Uieir way, 
America would be governed by die 
Communist Man^esto, which didn't 
woric for Russia and won't work for 
America. Instead of sending troops 
to Bosnia,we should be taking care of 
business here at home; dwre is much 
to be (k}ne. 
Welcome to die real world. 




Tlie Yirginia Beach Sun 

IM Smith SoMmmt Ro«d 

Siito209 

Virsiiila BcMh, Va. 23452 

Tefephone: (804) 486-3430 

(USPS660-I40) 



Pobltdicr 
HmesBy^ 

EdMcN^Snpcrvlwr 
Jamie Brown 

^Itn- 
ViclariaHecltt 

QNuptMitkia 

M J. Knobioct 

Th« Vffginit Bead) Sun is ^sb- 
liihed every Mfa^t^Bysly PuUka- 
tioiu. Inc., 1000 Armory Drive, 
I^iridii, Virginia23851 . SecondOM 
poM^epaid in Franklin, Virginiand 
a dd it k md oilry oSices. R>stnMer 
Send addreaa (^iges to lOOO itamxy 
Drive, ftaydln. Vi^ina 23851. Sub- 
KOf^m Ra^: By mail addre^ 
within ^ mile* of Vir|inia Bac^ 
Va.. Mie year, $14.95, two,^«i. 
K6J0. Virginia md N«wfc CuDlina, 
oae y«ff. $16.85. two yem. $»J0. 
An otha lUiM one yee, $2U)ft two 
)wst.^JO. Piy^ in tAtmat. 

OAar Byi^ MUcMkm aewa- 
PVm: The f hw ^ieriM PtoM. Ifm 
Vattiamvii Ttma, The TvSnma 
New,TheBnnawidTiBia-O^H^ 
TlM Iiwl qtwrieat Mcmm^s. 1^ 
Dimd& MeiHkir. Itie Niari»i 



Pick a park for a 
pleasure outing 



Viriini< Beach Sun. Rriday, Oeccmber 8. 1995 ^ 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf 



For this and next wcdc's column, I 
want to shate some infamalion about 
cm district and ccanmunity parks. 
TTiis is the kind of information that 
you can keep and refer back to t^e 
am] time apin. 

The city of Virginia Beach. 
Department of Paries and Recreation, 
operates 
seven district 
andtworom- 
munity paries 
which offer a 
variety of 
amenities, 
each unique 
in its offer- 
ings to the 
public. The 
city parks are 
open year- 
round.except 
Christmas 
Day. Play 
equipment 
such as balls, 
bats, horse- 
shoes and 
volleyball 
nets can be 
clicked out of the park of flee at each 
of the district or community park 
with a driver's license or other froffi 
of identification. 

The Parks Operations and 
AdministraticHi office is located at 
the Municipal Center, and the staff 
can be reached at 563-1 100. Picnic 
shelters are available for reservations 
at any disuict or community park and 
can be made in advance by contacting 
the Parks Leisure Events Office at 
473-5251. 

Shelter sizes range from eight to 12 
tables. All shelters have grills for 
charcoal cooking. Reservations may 
be made for a half day or for all day. 
Fee for half day reservations are $30. 
Options for half days are from 1 1 
a.m. - 3 p.m. or 3:30p.m. - sunset All 
day reservations are $60; an all-day 
reservation would be from 1 1 a.m. - 
sunset 

Electrical outlets are available in 
all three shelters at Princess Anne 
Park and Woodstock Park and an 
additional fee of$10is charged upon 
approval. A permit needs to be 
obtained through the paries Leisure 
Events Office prior to bringing items 
suchasamusemcnirides.dunk tanks, 
coolring'grilIs,:«m8, dwsjl^s] 'bands 
and pony rides into any city i»rk. 

The shelter reservation fee may be 
paid by mail or in patson at the Parks 
Leisure Events Office at Mt. 
Trashmore Park, 300 Edwin Dr.. 
Virginia Beach, Va., 23462. For more 
information or to make your 
reswvation, call 473-5251. Here are 
a few of the highlights of the district 
and community parks available for 
your use: 

■ Bay ville Farms Pari: is a 68-acre 
district parte located on Fii^t Court 
Road near Shore Drive in the Bayside 
Borough. The park isopen year round 
from 7:30 a.m. - 1 1 p.m., exc^t fat 
December through miuch the park 
cl(^ at sunset. Facilities include six 
lighted tennis and basketball courts, 
two lighted softball fields, three large 



group picnic shelters, pla^ouidb. 
shuffleb(»rd courts, an 18-hole disc 
golf course, volleyball courts, 
hoi^shoe pits and reslrooms. 

Additionally, family picnic tables 
and grills, a small pond for fishing 
arKi an arb(»etum are available. For 
further information about Bayvillc 
Farms F^k, you may call the Park 
Office at 460-7569. 

■ Great Neck Park is a 70-acre 
district park located at 2513 
Shorehaven Dr. behind Cox High 
School in the Lynnhaven bonni^. 
The park is open year round firom 
7:30 a.m. - sunset F^ilities include: 
four Softball fields with clay infields, 
one informal softball backstop, five 
large group shelters, seven mini- 
shelters, family picnic tables and 
grills, three playgrounds, horseshoe 
pits, volleyball courts and restrooms. 
Additionally, a gazebo located at the 
end of a scenic walkway overlooks 
the Lynnhaven Bay. 

Located next to the park is the 
Great Neck community Recreation 
Center, which provides indoor 
recreation facilities and programs. 
For further information about Great 
Neck f^rk, you may call the Park 
Office at 496-6735. 

■ Litde Island Park is a 144-acre 
beach park located next to the Atlantic 
Ocean, north of the Back Bay Wildlife 
Refuge. A fishing pier is available to 
the public (a fee is charged; however, 
no fishing license is required on the 
pier). The park has a 775-foot beach 
north of the fishing pier for surfing 
and a 2,000- foot beach for swimming 
and fishing south of the pier. Fishina; 
from the beach does require a fishing 
license. Lighted tennis courts, 
basketball courts, restrooms, picnic 
shelters and parking are available at 
this reclaimed Coast Guard Station 
setting. 

Back Bay , abrackish l£dee, provides 
excellent fishing and crabbing along 
the weston border of this unique 
parte (fishing license required). The 
parte is open year round from 5:30 
a.m. - sunset Lifeguards are m duty 
daily from 9:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. froni 
Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day 
weekaid. For further infcsmation call 
tiw Parte Office at 426-7200. 

■ Lynnhaven Park is a 15-acre 
community park located at 1246 
Bayne "Dr. next to the Lynnhaven 
Middle ScitQol in the Lynnhaven 
B(m)ugh. Hiepark is opoi year round 
from 7:30 a.m. - 1 1 p.m. excqjt from 
December through March, the park 
ctoses at sunset Facilities include 12 
lighted hard-surface tennis courts 
(which are presently undergoing 
extensive renovations), three lighted 
basketballcourts,eightlighted4-wall 
outdoor racquetball courts, a lighted 
softball field and restrooms. 

AtMitionally, a volleyball court, 
basketball court, a idaying field and 
tiiree mini-shelters are looited on this 
site. For furth» information about 
Lynnhaven Parte, you may call the 
Parte Office at 496-6742. 

Phyllis Maness, adnUnistrative 
assistant for the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks andRecrecUion, 
contributed to this column. 



Amphitheater vandals sought 



More than $50,000 in damage to 
equipment and buildings at Virginia 
Beach's amphitheater under 
ctHistruction on Recreation Drive is 
still under investigation. Crime 
Solvers is 
offering a 
reward for a 
tip that will 
lead inves- 
tigators to an 
arrest 

Oi Friday 
night, Oct 27 
b«ween6:30 
p.m. and 6 
a.m. the fol- 
lowing min- 
ing, som«)ne 
entered the 
construction 
area and used 
a bulldozer to 
run over 
equipment 

arid knock 

" down a wall 

to the 

administration building of the 




Crime 
Solvers 

By Detective 
Midtael G. Der- 
went, Virginia 
Beach Police De- 
partment 



Anyone with 
information can 

call Crime 
Solvers 24 hours 

at 4270000. 

Rewards are paid 
in cash. 



amphitheater. A red Chevrolet Blazer 
was %en leaving the construction 
site and may have been involved or 
may have witness the destn^tion. 

The dama^ has been repaired m^ 
security guards now watch the 
property. 

Anyone with information can call 
Crime Solvere 24 hours at 427-0000. 
Rewards are paid in cash. Callers are 
not required to give their name or 
phone number. 



Reflections on 12 months 



DCeiMmMMl n«m n^^ 2 

Ewi is my hi^ mA«xA sweetheart 
— 'VaB'cme"w^atine(rf^«iticMkNi 
■ndyowik. 

I taff^ Htfe diai^ Wet my 
•w^k do^i't ^re fcr poctes, to 
big Mnp thA I'd ^ M sooi 1^ 
P^bwmU. 

I famed tttt we both lave <m 
^alm^mmA s«nm|phs,Mul tfiat 
«^n Ae tm doD't Jiw ft cnniMB 



all out warfare (««11, maybe not "all 
out"). I also femned that making up is 
t}% best part of fighting. 

Lastly , I team^ tltt tiiis i»a y^ 
WMjiMte ft«Mq>(tfakng journey 
we wUl ttl« Kig^ba mA that it will 
lead us down smwMnooth, and axne 
rocky. it^Kb. But, with lode, we will 
bejwe^ved. 

I niae my ^ms to tte Aittne uid 
ay '^m 'B iq}!" Om ^m'fm. 'vm'i 



Up close and personal 

^Ethj goxdon: Outfitting titttt (and tig) gixt^ ' d' 



%sam± 



By VICTORIA HECHT 
Sun Editor 

This Christmas Eve thousands — if not 
millions — of litUe girts will got to siMp 
with visions of dollhouses, as l»ighi and 
colorful as sugar plums, dancing through 
their heads. A few of Uiem will be lucky 
enough to find one of Betty Gordon's 
miniature homes tucked under the tinsel- 
bedecked tree. 

Then again, it's not just litUe girls who 
yearn for one of these dream toys. Plcniy of 
"big girls" stop by Gordon's shop. Just 
Imagine, in Countryside Shops at the 
Virginia Beach Farmer's Market to "ooh" 
and "ah" at these marvelous creations as 
they remember their childhood days. They, 
too, often find one wrapped up under the 
tree. 

"I've always loved dolls and dollhouses," 
said Gordon, a Brigadoon resident whose 
shop has been making dreams come true for 
eight years. "I just love 'em. Maybe it's 
because I never had any girts. But it's 
amazing because my boys, every lime they 
have friends come over, say, 'Hey, come 
and look what my mom did.' They're real 
proud and interested in it" 

Gordon jokes that she's living her second 
childhood. But she is also providing others 
with wonderful memories and dollhouses 
that will one day be handed down as 
hcirlooin.s. 

"I'll tell you what I love: seeing other 
people enjoy tiie miniatures. They'll come in 
and say, 'Well, 1 don't know exactly how to 
do this.' Sometimes if you make suggestions, 
they'll come back again so proud. I get 
pleasure out of seeing other people do a 
project than me doing it. I enjoy that, too, 
but it's the other people who make me smile. 
It's like a litUe kid at Christmas when you 
see their faces. It's like Christmas every 
day." 

Even Gordon sometimes marvels at how 
ordinary items, such as a chair, a book or 
fork, can be reproduced in scal6 to fit 
dollhouses. One of Just Imagine's dollhouse 
furniture lines even features bedroom suites 
representative of Broyhill's most popular 
line! 

"They can miniaturize just about anytiiing. 
You'll come across things, like this tape 
recoitlcr here, that diey can make so tiny — 
and it might even work. People sometimes 
say, 'Doesn't it make you crazy working with 
all these litUe miniatures?'" she said. 

While many young girls' bedrooms are 
home to a Just Imagine dollhouse, likewise 
are their mothers' or even grandmothers'. 

"But lots'of people my age think they 
can't do that. They don't realize they're 
entitled to enjoy this, too," noted Gordon. 
"But if their child or grandchild sees them 
appreciating it, they will be more interested 
than if you just hand it to them and say, 
'Here, I did this for you.'" 

Some adults, however, pursue dollhouses 
as a serious hobby. Gordon caters to their 
needs, too. She even remembers one woman 
who wanted to buy a dollhouse for her 
mother, who was in a nursing home. 

"She said it was the best thing she ever 
did, because her mother didn't want to be 
there but had to. She wasn't very outgoing. 
Bui when she bought the dollhouse everyone 
came to see it. That really brought her out 
and gave her a lot of company and friends. 
It's stuff like that that makes inc feci g(M)d. 1 
laugh because we have people from 4 to 94 
who enjoy it." 

Surprisingly, Gordon said, even men are 
fascinated by dollhouses. 

"If the wives bring them in here, we can't 
get the husbands out. They don't want to do 
dollhouses for themselves, but they 
appreciate the detail and how everything 
works." 

Although her home is filled with many 
projects under way, Gordon's personal 
"therapy" comes from making porcelain 
dolls. After signing up for a doll-making 
class several years ago, she quickly became 
hooked. 

"And I save every single one (doll)," she 
smiled. "I tiiought it would be interesting to 
make one. but I never actually thougl)t I 
could." 

Name: Betty Gordon 

What brought you to this area: I 

fell in love and married nfiy husband, 
who was living in Virginia Beach. 




Hometown: Birmingham, Ala. 

Birthdate: Oct. 26. 

Nickname: None. 

Occupation: Co-owner of Just 
Imagine. 

Marital Status: I've been married to 
a wonderful man for 25 years, Joe 
Gordon. 

Children: Two sons: Joe Gordon Jr., 
23, a longshoreman; and, John Gordon, 
20, a student at Old Dominion 
University. 

Favorite movie: Like all women, I 
probably prefer romances, but I end up 
seeing what my husband goes to see. I 
call them "shoot 'em ups " 

Magazines I regularly read: 

Nutshell News, Miniature Collector and 
Dollcrafter 

Favorite author: Danielle Steelei 

Favorite night out on the town: 

Dinner and a movie. 

Favorite restaurant: Lone Star 
Restaurant. 

Favorite meal: Anything I don1 
have to cook or clean up after — 
meaning anything eaten out. 

What most people don't linow 
about me: 1 talk so much that there 
isn't too much people don't know about 
me. 

Best thing about myself: I love 
people. 



Worst habits: Impatience and 
procrastination. 

Pets: Three Shihtzus named Scooter, 
Suzy and Missy. 

Hobbies: Miniatures and making 
porcelain dolls. 

Ideal vacation: Going anywhere 
with my family. 

Pet peeves: Things used to bother 
me a lot more than they do now, so I 
cant think of any one thing that drives 
me crazy. Amongst all the stress in the 
world, you have to take time to stop and 
laugh. 



First Job: Clerk at a candy counter in 
a live and dime store. 

Worst job: 1 haven't really had any. 

Favorite sports teams: I don't 
really have one — just listen to all the 
sports play-by-plays from my husband 
and kids. 

Favorite musicians: Anything on 
WFOG. 

I would like my epitaph to read: 

( don't have time to stop and think about 
dying. 

If I received $1 million: I'd pay 

part of my bills and give the rest away to 
family and friends. 

If I had 10 minutes on national 
television: I would tell everybody thai 
the world could be almost perfect if 
everyone would just practice the Golden 
Rule. 



Marine Science l\/luseum receives $1 miiiion gift 



Hie Virginia Marine Science 
Museum Foundation Inc. has 
announced that it has received a 
mile^one gift of $1 million ^ro 
The Family Channel. Virgtnia- 
BeM;li. The ttonatun is earmaiiced 
tiff the nu^Hon's new IMAX 3D 
Hotter co^ttty indo' txmsiwtion 
and actaMed to tqien »riy next 
sumn«. The Family CSiamtel gift 
brings the mnseom foundation's 
capiul campaign to within 
SKW.OOO of its g(»l of $S million 
tot the new mu^m exhibits. 

"We are thrilled with the 
significance of The Family 
Channel's gift; it is the the largest 
tingle donation in oiir capital 
cvapaign thus fv and ia psrha|» 



even U»e largest single private 
s^tor donation in our capital 
campaign thus far and is perhaps 
even the largest single private 
a^M donation in the history of our 
city," said C, Kfec Rawls, dirrctor 
of the Virginia Marine Science 
Museum. 

The museum's capital campaign 
chairman. Thomas R. Frantz, said 
the Tlte Family Channel gift will 
benefit the rising six -story, 300- 
seat IMAX Theater, oi« of the first 
IMAX 3D theata? in the county. It 
will offer visitors a spectacular 3-D 
viewing experience of marine 
Mamtct md nauirc films, complete 
with a state-of-the-art sound 
system. 



The total cost of the Virginia 
Marine Science Museum's 
landmark exi^nsnn project is $35 
million, of which the museum 
Foundation, a uniqiM public^vate 
enteri»ise, is responsible for $5 
million to fund new exhibits. The 
remaining $30 miiiion of capital 
construction costs are funded 
through U>e City of Virginia Be«A 
Capital Iffipro^^i^ts I^>giam'$ 
Tourist Growth Inv^tment Fund. 
All exhibit are being fumM from 
{Mivate contribtttoos raised through 
he efforts (tf itte PouKlatim. 

When completed early next 
summer, the museum expansion 
will triple the size of the existing 
museum, long one of the most 



popular attractions in the 
Southeast "Our new museum will 
be unlike any other aquarium or 
museum elsewhere in the world," 
Rawls said. Visitors will expoisK^ 
a mix of attractions — hands-on 
interactive exhibits interspersed 
widi live wimal exhibits — in an 
indoor/outdoor setting that, 
museum planners believe, will set 
the standmd for maine science 
faciliti^ of the future. 

TIk ex|Mnsion is designed by E. 
yfmetSdhsasm «id Aaocittes, and 
int^MMifmiUy leo^Azed mi^wns 
as The Louvre and The 
Smiihsttum. Genoal ONittacn- for 
construction is W.M. Jordan 
QjnipMy trf NewptHt News. 



^^^^^^^^^ 



lA^MMMM 



■^^^"^^^•I^^Wi^"^ 



i^np^i^i^i«" 



4 Viniiiiia Beach Sun. FWdav. Decanbg 8, 1995 





A FAMILY EVENT. Take the whoie png to an sfteraooR or cveRlng 
«f coUrfil cottvmet, scenery and ballet at Tattercoats Ltil. 
prerfactlen ef "Mr. Craniple'i Christmas Crtols" 

Tattercoats Ltd. brings 
holiday ballet to II 



"Mr. Crumplc's Christmas 
Crisis'" is the eighth annual 
original ballet produced by 
Tattercoats Ltd., a non-profit 
organization formed in 1979 for the 
advancement of the arts among and 
for children. 

Written and choreographed by 
Gail Barnes. "Mr. Crumplc's 
Christmas Crisis" follows 
Tattercoats' tradition of children's 
ballets in beauty of design, 
precision of dance, and truth of 
message. TTiis one-hour production 
presents the story off a forgetful old 
man and a jraung girl who gives her 
all to save the town from the greedy 
villain, Mr. Neevas Marble. Laugh 
at the creative antics of the town's 
stfeet urchins, come to the town's 
masquerade ball, where fairy tales 
come to life. Remember the true 
meaning of ChrisBnas. 
This touching and powerful 



production is highlighted by rich 
music from classical composers. 
TTie costumes and set, designed by 
award-winning artist Tom Barnes, 
arc feasts for the eyes and elaborate 
in every detail. 

As in years past, approximately 
2,000 school children will attend 
day-lime performances the week 
prior to the public shows. 

Public performances are Friday. 
Dec. 8 at 8 p.m., Saturday Dec. 9 
at 2 p.m.. and Sunday, Dec. 10 at 2 
and 4 p.m. at the Virginia Beach 
Center for the Arts, 2200 Parks 
Ave., Virginia Beach. 

Advance tickets may be purchased 
at the Harvest Company Bookstore 
in Providence Square shopping 
center, Virginia Beach or their new 
location in Chesapeake at the 
Volvo Parkway Center. For more 
information or reservations, call 
498-2627. 



Make it a 'Continental Cliristmas' 



CelelHBte the season with The 
U.S. Continental Army Band 
when they perform holiday 
favorites at two evening evmis at 
R Monroe on Dec. 14. 

Hampton Roads residents are 
invited to a community tree 
ligltting caem<Niy beginning at 6 
p.m. at Continenul Park, where 
the band will perform traditional 
carols with the Fort Monroe 
Holiday Singers and the King's 
Kids Choir. 

Following the tr^ lighting and 
Santa's visit, the Continental 



Army Band will perform "A 
Family Holiday Celebration" at 
7:30 p.m. at the Post Theater, 
Building 42. Featured in the 
performance will be John Miller, 
a local television news anchor at 
WVEC-TV, Channel 13, narrating 
"Twas the Night Before 
Christmas." 

In ca^ of bad weather, the tree 
lighting ceremony will be 
cancelled, but the band concert 
will take place as scheduled. 

Both events are free to the 
public. 




Treat yourself to 'Hansel and Gretel' 



Virginia Opera's Education 
Department will ring in the 
holiday season with two public 
performance of "Hansel and 
Gretel" as part of the "Family 
Series" held at the Chrysler 
Museum Theater in Norfolk on 
Dec. 10 at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 
p.m. 

The "Family Series" is part of 
Virginia Opera's outreach 
program. The purpose is to 
broaden and enrich the cultural 
experiences of students and the 
community to provide a lifelong 
^preciation of music. 

Last year's "Family Series" 
proved to be a huge success with 
the performance of "Alice 
Through The Opera Glass" at the 
Harrison Opera House. Hundreds 
of onlookers including parents 
and grandparcnts watched as Alice 
Moved through the enchanted 
opera forest while introducing 
opera chanKitcrs past and present. 
This year's performance of 
"Han.scI and Gretel" will capture 
the hearts of many fairy tale fans 
as the wicked old witch tries to 
lure two children into her 
gingerbread house at the Chrysler 
Museum. This 45-minnte 
production will keep children 
widc-cycti and spcllb(Hind as they 
are inu-oduccd to the characters of 
Hansel and Gretel, their mother. 




DONt ^TTRAT! M it {• ace 
leaati. 

the Sandman and the Witch. 
"Hansel and Gretel" will stir and 
delight ihe imagination of 
children with soaring areas, duets 
and lush melodies. 

Be sure not to miss this lively 
and entertaining production filled 
with all the magic you could ever 



the VlffMa Opcfi'a pnUeOm M "Ibncl •■< eratcT iMi iMMiy 



dream of. This children's classic 
an Virginia Opera favorite is a 
sure way to ring in the holidays. 
These special performances will 
be sung in English and are 
appropriate for children of all 
ages. Tickets are S6 for adults and 
$3 for children. 



The next "Family Series" is 
planned for April 23, with the 
Bay Youth Orchestra of Virginia. 
For more information on the 
"Hansel and Gretel" performance 
at the Chrysler Museum Theater, 
call Virginia Opera's Box Office 
at 623-1223. 



Holiday production! 



CMMiqfnwie 



Tlw &imtmf% School ft>r tfie Arts Dcpartiwnt of Vocal Mu^c It 
pn^mtt^ tfie repeat of its highly suo^ssfiri prodjcuon of Qan Carlo 
mnm% 'fmH md tfie Nl^t visitors," preceded by a amcert of 
OnMrh oroii 1^ the ensemble. This may be the rm^ often Mr^nm^ 
niuiMii plKS durtig the Ovtavnas snson next to HandeTi "iM^h." 
TMi iftnpte itoiy of fie 3mng ertopled b(^ and M meettv wM the Thre^ 
m» hM «Mnned te h^itt (rf al who have ^ R mat U pt«mta« m 
19§it. The ft%-sttgBd mA txmmtA o^e% wM h«« Mo p^faiww ^s 
Mtm^. Dec. 16 It 8 pjn., af^ $un&^, Dec. 17 M 2 p.ffl, M ttw 
Qm0m R«M HiN of Old Dominion Unh«rslty. ENdiom and 4Mi 
mtm, AdmMon is $4i dR 451-4711 or M3-4271 for rMenMorw. 



Renowned vocalist slates Portsmouth concert 

Brenda Boozer brings talents 
to Willett Hall stage Dec. 9 

American mezzo so{HBno Brenda the Composer in "Ariadne auf 



Worid of Entertainment." Choir Boys on Jan. 13 and the New 

Remaining concerts in the Xavier Cugat Orchestra on April 8. 

Portsmouth Community Concert For more information, call 393- 

Series this seaK)n are TTie Vienna 5144. 



Boozer is known as one of the most 
well-round^ and versatile singing 
actresses da the operatic stage. She 
has performed in the worid's most 
prestigious opera houses, including 
the Metropolitan, Covent Garden, 
Paris, Florence, Lyric Opera of 
Chicago, Santiago,' Houston Grand 
Opera, Frankfurt, San Francisco, 
Amsffiidam and Santa Fe. 

She has with such renowned 
conductors as Carlo Maria Guilini, 
James Levine, Jeiji Ozawa and 
Erich Leinsdorf. For the past 
seasons following a departure from 
the operatic stage for parental 
obligations, Boozer has sung 
hundreds of concerts through the 
United States as a member of 
Community Concerts. Upcoming 
engagements include staged 
performances of "El Amor Brujo" 
wiUi the San Antonio and Colorado 
Springs Symphonies as well as a 
series of recitals with the 
prestigious Community Concerts 
Series. 

But first she is coming to 
Hampton Roads for a ccmcert Dec. 
9 at 8 p.m. at Willett Hall in 
Portsmouth. The event is ^nsored 
by Portsmouth Community 
Concerts. Tickets can be obtained at 
the box office on the evening of the 
performance. 

Boozer made her Metropolitan 
Opera debut in 1979 as Hansel in 
"Hansel and Gretel," appearing later 
as Ociavian in "DerRosenkavaliw," 



Naxos," Orlofsky in "Die 
Fledermaus," Nicklausse in "The 
Tales of Hoffmann," Cornelia in 
"Guilio Cesare," Olga in "Eugene 
Onegin," Suzukin in "Madama 
Butterfly" and Meg Page in 
"Falstaff." 

She sang Famace in the Aix-en- 
Provence productiMi of "Mitridate, 
Re di Ponto," which was later 
presented on tour in Nice, Lyon and 
Orieans. Recent highlights of her 
career include "Rosenkavalier" in 
Frankfurt, "Falstafr at Covent 
Garden, in IHorence and Paris and 
"The Tales of Hoffmann" at the 
1989 Spoleto Festival/Italy. 

As a concert soloist, Boozo* has 
performed with the orchestras of 
Philadelphia, Los Angeles, St. 
Louis, Seattle and the National 
Symphony, among others. She has 
participated in festivals such as 
Edinburgh, MosUy Mozart, Spoleto 
U.S.A., Wolf Trap, Carmel Bach 
and at the Hollywood Bowl. 
Appearing under the baton of Carlo 
Maria Guilini, Boozer sang Mag 
Page in Falstaff for the award- 
winning DGG recording. 

Bom in Atlanta, Boozer received 
degrees from Florida State 
University and the Juilliaid School, 
as well as private studies with the 
legendary Martha Graham. For 
many years, a ^pular guest on 
television, she has appeared often 
on the "Tonight Show," "The Mike 
Douglas Show" and ABC's "Wide 




Wesleymen present family 
music worship service 



Bwida Boozer 



The Annual Wesleymen 
Christmas Service • in Epworth 
United Methodist Church, 
Freemason at Boush Street in 
Norfolk, on Dec. 8 at 7 p.ai. will 
be directed by Davkl V. Van Hook. 

Van Hook lives in ChurchlMjd 
and is a former president of the 
Tidewater Music Teaches Forum, 
has perfcmned at the White IfoiiK, 
served as minister of Music of 
Westhavcn Baptist Church and 
Christ Methodist Church, is a 
former music director of the 
Portsmouth BiqKist Aamditicm imi 
is presently serving as music 
director rfThe W^eymen. 

He is also piania for the Riv» 
Shore Baptist Church in 



Portsmouth. 

Irving R. Baccus Jr. of 
Churchland will be pianist and 
tenor soloist for this service. He 
has served as pianist of 
Portsmouth's Church of the 
Resuirection. 

Kimboly Haywood, organist and 
marimba soloist, is a gradiuite of 
Churchland Junior High Schod ami 
a member of the Ttdewam^ Winds, 
who has given nuuiy concerts in 
Portsmouth. 

Following this iffl|VMSive fomily 
worship service, ev«^i» will go 
to the Kxnal hail for a ret^on and 
Christinas party featiiring home- 
made goodies and a visit with 
Santa, who will ^ve nch child a 
gift. 



ir COLLIDE 1$ rN YOUR CHILDS f UiURE 
US SAVINCS BONDS 
SHOULD BE IN YOUR PRESENT 



For a nconM m«n^ of oifivM nMt InfeiftiMion, aril 
1-MMIM low • 1-ie0-4l7>^ 



ibfSW9 






3-STAR 

MOTOR COMPANY 
17307 Hull Street Rd. 

Ojxn Monday-Saturday 8:00 am to 6:00 pm 
Closed Sunday H 

Good Credit? Bad Credit? 

No Credit? 



We Finance No 
Matter What!! 



Contact Jim or Khoda at 

1 (800) 317-8277 

If You Try Us. You Will Drive Home Tbday! 




SO Om% A Trucks to Choose fnml 



^■^^Wll^..« ji- 



■^^PB^M^ 



Virginia Beac h Sun. Friday, December 8. 1995 S 



Volunteers, Spaghetti Warehouse spread holiday cheer to less fortunate Icids 



By MARGARET WINDLEY 
Correqxjndent 

If Santa Claus has a favorite 
food, it ought to be si^ghetti — 
especially after the folks at 
Spaghetti Warehouse in Norfolk 
threw such a great Fourth Annual 
Community Holiday Ftoy at tlKir 
restaurant for some of his less 
privileged friends in the Hampton 
Roads area. 

"It's for kids who might not 
Wherwise have much Christmas — 
who are less privileged than 
others," explained Bob Duzey, the 
restaurant's general manager. 
"There are different groups 
throughout the year that might need 
more than others. We have kept 
tabs on it. We have done it now 
fffl- the fourdi year." 

The Christmas party for the 
i:)iildren was not his idea, but he, 
like the rest of the employees at the 
chain, have a great fondness for the 



concept 

"Twenty-three years ago it was 
started by the founder of the 
company when he started it up in 
Dallas," he said of the chain's 
founder Robert Hawk. "It was his 
way of giving back to the 
community." 

"Spaghetti Warehouse has been 
doing it for 21 years," said Mary 
Patterson, regional marketing 
manager. 

To feed the approximately 400 
children and group chaperones, 
caregivers and parents present that 
day, the restaurant was cooking up 
"60 gallons of spaghetti sauce, 80 
pounds of spaghetti, lots of 
popcorn, salad, cookies. Here it is 
— 1,200 homemade cookies and 
seven gallons of ' beverage 
minimum." 

Adding that the restaurant was 
clos^ U) the general public that day 
until 4 p.m. to handle the party. 




ENfOYMG THE FOOD? Approximately 400 imlcrprtvilefed chUdren 
in Hampton Roads were treated to a holiday party and meal at the 
Spaghetti Warebooec last weekend. Vartoas agencies pitched In to 
help with the festivitlet. 



she also explained that all the work 
being done for it was also a 
donation of time and effort. 

The warehouse was ai«) 

filled widi volunteers from all ov» 
Hampton Roads. 

Corporal Sue-Lynn Daugaard, 
USMC, was one of the many 
people there fortunate to be able to 
donate the gift of lime. A resident 
of Virginia Beach, she has been 
involved in the program for three 
years. 

"It's a wonderful opportunity lo 
help kids," she smiled. 

"Children that might not get a 
Christmas this year. The Marine 
Corps League is a sponsor. There 
are three Marine Corps units that 
cooperate with each other for the 
Tidewater area." 

She just loved the opportunity to 
give some of her time to help the 
little ones. 

"My experience with Spaghetti 
Warehouse is just %eing the faces 
of the children light up when they 
sec the toys." 

Stuart Cake, coordinator of the 
event for Spaghetti Warehouse, was 
in his clement with a jollincss that 
gave him a young Santa Claus-like 
quality. 

"There are face painters from the 
different cities," he said, "We have 
clowns from the Shriners, also 
Bobby the Clown and Snuggles and 
Merman the Magician. There are 
lots of local volunteers willing to 
give their time from throughout the 
area." 

Joe Newman, a member of the 
Chesapeake City Council, showed 
up to lend a hand. 

"It's so nice to have people like 
this to care at this lime. We need 
to make more busihesses aware of 
ihe real Chrisunas joy. They said 
there would be about 400 kids here 
today, didn't they? We take so 
many things like this for granted. 
So many of these kids don'i have 
loo much." 

Sheriff Gary Water.s of 
Portsmouth was present also as a 




ifMHOiiiir mm^iMm ffvmvy 

FUN! FUN! FUN! That's what these volonteers wanted the 400 lets fortinate children from Norfoili, 
Poritmooth, Vir[^nia Beach, Chesapeake and Svffolk to experience when they came to the Spaghetti 
Warehoose for a day of feasting and toys. 



vofimiccr. 

"1 ihink it's a good thing that 
Spaghetti Warehouse is doing for 
ihc kids. The Police Association of 
Virginia ju.si took five kids from 
each of the five cities — Norfolk, 
Portsmouth, Chesapeake, Suffolk, 
and Virginia Beach and spent $200 
each on each kid — on clothes, 
shoes, coats. Then we let them 
spend the rest on toys. We are 
delighted that these organizations 
care so much about the kids that 
they do this. We have about 75 
from Portsmouth." 

He smiled, "It's a fine day for the 
kids." 

Jerry Haynie, residing in Virginia 
Beach, had been recruited to help 
with the Christmas party originally 
three years ago because he was a 
neighbor of Cake's, but continued 



to participate because he really 
enjoyed helping children. 

He loved it, noting, "ii's jusi 
seeing the joy of ihc kids and 
seeing ihai a community as a 
whole, not just Norfolk or Virginia 
Beach, can come together in one 
event. It's just seeing children 
enjoy themselves and knowing they 
don't have lo worry about 
everything that is going on in their 
lives, just having the time to enjoy 
themselves. 

"I have got children myself and as 
my children were growing up I saw 
a need for other children who were a 
little less fortunate — who needed 
to have something in their lives 
thai would make them happy," he 
recalled. 

Organizations contacted by 
Spagheui Warehouse included East 



Ocean View Baptist Church 
Mission, the Norfolk Police 
Deparunent (DARE progran/Crime 
Prevention Unit), Virginia Beach 
Police Department (Police Athletic 
League), Portsmouth Sheriff 
Department (DARE program. 
Crime Prevention Unit), 
Chesapeake Police Department 
(DARE program. Crime Prevention 
Unit), the Armed Forces YMCA, 
Navy Family Service Centers for 
Oceana/Dam Neck and Little Creek 
as well as for Norfolk/Ports- 
mouih/Chesapeake, Army Emer- 
gency Relief, and ihe Norfolk 
Sheriff Department (Big Broth- 
ers/Big Sisters). . 

Gifts were donated by several 
local and national charitable 
organizations and businesses. 






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(Reg. Retail $1800) 




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■^w 



^mm^mrm* 



w^^W^ 



fr Viiginia Be«:h Sun. Riday, Decembg 8. 1995 



Education 




COWW^rPlMM 



"Movie star" 

"Mrs. Doubtfire" roamed the halls and visited the classrooms at 
Unkhom Park Elementary School recentiy. No, It was not Robin 
Williams dressed as tfie character from the movie of the same name. 
This Mrs. Doubtfire was Llnkhorn Park Elementary School's own 
principal. Carroll Monger, who agreed to dress the part in celebration 
of the school reaching the goal of 100 percent membership in the 
PTA. Kim Garrod, PTA membership chairperson, stated that she asked 
students in her nei^bofhood what they would like to see Mon^r do 
when the school achieved the 100 percent goal. Among the 
suggestions were changing places for a day with SCA Resident Jay 
Rixey and dressing as the movie character. Monger chose to be Mrs. 
Doubtfire for a day. 



Cox High plans fashion show 



Cox High School's fashion 
marketing classes will present their 
annual fashion show Dec. 12 at 
7:30 p.m. in the school's 
auditorium. 

"Frostbitten," the show's title, is 
the product of the fashion 
marketing classes. Students have 
full responsibility for developing 
the show's theme and music, 
choosing the stores to showcase, 
writing the fashion commentaries. 



building the sets, auditioning 
student and faculty models and 
providing publicity. 

Thirty-six students and faculty 
members will model outfits from 
Dan Ryan's For Men, Maxines, 
Merry-Go-Round, Gravity, Up 
Against the Wall, Karen Eagle and 
Mitchell's Formal Wear. Tickets 
went on sale Dec. 4 at Cox high 
School. The cost is S4 in advance 
and $4.50 at the (kxir. 



Beach resident is Outstanding 
Alumnus of Radford University 



Jennie Teass AUman of 
Virginia Beach received the 199S 
Outstanding Alumnus Award from 
Radford University during fall 
homecoming festivities. 

The daughter of the late Leo 
and Hallie Teass, Allman 
graduated from Radford in 1967 
with a bachelor's degree in 
hisuxy. After teaching in Bedford 
County for three years, she 
embarked on a new career padi as 
the marketing support 
representative for IBM from 19^ 
to 1973. 

A year later, she became 
director of office automation for 
Norfolk Southern Corporation, 
where she worked until 1987. 
Additionally, she received the 
designation of certified 
administrative manago' in 1982. 

Since 1987, AUman has 
engaged in several successful 
ventures as an entrepreneur. A 
property developer and golf 
course owner, she is presictent of 
two investment companies. 
Echols Creek Inc. and R/I 



Enterprises; owner and president 
of Golf Classics Inc.; and, vice 
president of Ivy Acres Inc. 

A former president of RU's 
National Alumni Association, 
UR's Bedford Alumni Chapter and 
the Roanoke Chapter of Alpha 
Sigma Tau alumni, Allman is a 
member of the American 
Association of University 
Women, president of the 
Administrative Management 
Society and has been named one 
of five outstanding women in 
southwest Virginia. 

She has also served as 
chairperson of the Bedford County 
School B(»rd. 

Allman seems to leave her 
mait everywhere she goes. 

She says, "I know that the only 
real contribution to society is the 
contribution that does not die 
when the money is spent or the 
grave is closed. That unique 
contributim is made only as we 
affect the lives of others I hope 
my real contribution to society is 
this infli^nce." 




Argentinians get lesson from Beach sciiools 



By MARGARET WINDLEY 
Sun Correspondent 

This city has some of die finest 
schools around. 

In fact, 22 people came all die 
way from Thomas Jefferson Col- 
lege in Argentina, a private 
school for students from kinder- 
garten through high school in 
Buenos Aires, recenUy just to see 
Virginia Beach's schools and 
compare the quality of eduction. 

The foreign guests, who in- 
cluded founders, owners and staff, 
as well as several teachers and 
students of the academy, visited 
such schools as Slrawbridge Ele- 
mentary School, Salem Middle 
School, B.F. Williams Elemen- 
tary School, Ocean Lakes Ele- 
mentary School and Virginia 
Beach Middle School. 

"This is all lo benchmark the 
implementation of quality in 
eduction in Virginia Beach as 
compared to quality implementa- 
tion in Thomas Jefferson in Ar- 
gentina. They have focused 
lessons and materials on problems 
solving techniques," said Dr. Pat 
Konopnicki; director of technical 
and career education in the Vir- 
ginia Beach school system. 

He could not help explaining 
the name of their facility after the 
famous Virginia. 

"They named the college partly 
in memory of the greatest educa- 
tor of all time," he said. "It's an 
honor to be visited by another 
country. It brings the city and 
community and education on the 
continents closer together." 

Konopnicki said that the trip 
had been arranged by David 
Langford, an internationally- 
known education expert. 

"He lives in Montana and 
teaches in Alaska. We met with 
him several limes, and he's very 
appreciative of the quality jour- 
ney in the Virginia Beach 
schools. What he has done is 
bring two countries together for 
the common purpose of improving 
education." 

Representative of the South 
American guests were the six who 
visited B.F. Williams Elementary 
School: Cecelia Interiichia, su- 
perintendent of the Jefferson Col- 
lege, who visited with Hector Ag- 
iiiar, principal of the elementary 
school and a pedagogical coordi- 
nator; Gabriella De Biase, a psy- 
chologist working on learning and 
disciplinary problems as well as a 



Academic 
Honors 



Kempsville Middle School is 
proud to name its Teacher of die 
Year for 1996-97. She is Sue 
Adcock, presentiy a sixUi grade 
language arts teacher for the 
Dolphins team. 



Luvenia Goolsby and Rose 
Johnson were recently awarded 
Certificates of Achievement for 
conducting an outstanding 
CHROME Club for the 1994-95 
school year at Landstown Middle 
School. They were recognized 
Nov. 15 at the CHROME 
Student/Teacher Annual 
Recognition Symposium. 
CHROME is an acronym for 
Cooperating Hampton Roads 
Organizations for Minorities in 
Engineering. 






A student from the Virginia 
Beach area has been selected for 
membership in the University 
Singers at Lipscomb UnivCTsity. 

DJ. Potter, a bassist, is the 
son of Dr. and Mrs. Henry G. 
Potter of Virginia Beach and a 
graduate of First Colonial High 
School. Potter is an arts-medicine 
maj(v. 

Hie University Singws perfwm 
a broad range of choral 
selections, spirituals, hymn 
vnmgements and hymns, said Dr. 
Larry Griffith, director and 
associate profcssw of music. 

Their program is targeted 
toward school and church 
audiences, he said. The 
University Singers will participaK 
n the Christian College Clraral 
Festival, which Lipscomb hosts 
This year, and have already 
tiMtred Al^anft md Tenoemec. 

Tte University Sin^rs are ime 
of six oi^oibles ottseA dirragh 
the university's department of 
musk. 




nwiot by Itogml tWNhy 

ENLIGHTENING VISIT. Virginia Beach's B.F. Willianm ElemcnUnr School got a vliit rtccntly from 
Argentinean edocators interested In Anxrican edacatiomi methods. 



school counselor; Diana Bertoli, 
legal advisor and one of the own- 
ers of the School; and, Nora 
BertoU, die interpreter. 

"We are die founders and own- 
ers of Thomas Jefferson College 
in Argentina," said Interiichia. 
"It's a private school in our coun- 
try. Most of the education is in 
the hands of the state." 

Adding that her nation was un- 
dergoing a very deep economic 
crisis, she explained that the Jef- 
ferson School was privately 
owned. 

"We do not receive aid from 
the state. It was opened four years 
ago, and when we opened the 
school, it was a dream come 
true." 

She spoke of die school's goals. 

"Our mission is to help students 
develop socially and intell^tu- 
ally to be able to face the de- 
mands of the rapidly changing 
world. We get kindergarten, ele- 
mentary and high school. It's a na- 
tional, federal reformation of edu- 
cation that will be put into prac- 
tice. It's soon to be mandated 
from 1996 onward. 

"There will be a reorganization 
of the whole educational system. 
This means that we will suffer dif- 




SPECIAL OPPORTUNITY. Virginia Beach's visiters from Argentina 
arrived In time to see Brenda Soter's class stadying Native" 
American coltnrc. Stadcms got down on the floor wMi spcakern 
Dixon Ogden to learn aboat Indians' castoms. 



ferent changes. Those students 
from high school get a degree in 
company administration. We are 
looking at the tech-prep pro- 
grams." 

The guests visited the fourdi 
grade classroom of Williams 



teacher Elaine Johnson, whose 
classroom uses handtools as an 
education device, a special edu- 
cation classroom and others in 
which 3-year-olds and their par- 
ents learn die type of skills that 
would help them later to adapt to 
school. 



Landstown Middle School's 
Lancers Against Drugs Club 
recenUy sponsored Smoke-Free 
Ring pledges in support of the 
Great American Smoke Out. More 
than 900 ring pledges were made 
and displayed around die school 
cafeteria. PTA parents. Merle 
Meyers and Ana Barrett, assisted 
along with the club advisors. 
Carol Wilson and Rose Johnson, 
in making the week-long event a 
success. 



Ocean Lakes Elementary is 
proud to announce that Tesleigh 
Eure, Missy Kruse, Kimberly 
Layton, Jillian McGowan, Ryan 
O'Connor, Tykeisha Price, 
Cheryl Reynolds and Jonelia 
Roberson were selected by the 
Video Services Department of 
Virginia Beach Channels 46, 47 
and 48 on Cox Cable to be on die 
Talent Pool List These students 
will be called upon whenever a 
production need arises for both 
on-camera and voice-over talent. 




Melissa Coiburn. daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Perry J. Colbum of 
Virginia Beach, has been elected 
to a student government position 
at Salem College. 

Colbum will »rve as the 1995- 
96 chaiiperaon of Big 3-»-3. Big 3 
•f3, a student budgeted 
organization, plans and organizes 
all major social events at Salem 
College including die Fall Lawn 
Party, Intcrclub (the fall semi- 
fomial dance) and Winter Formal. 



Aaron McKinney of Vkginia 
BeKh was awarded die Dean's 
Scholarahip at Taylor University 
for die 1W5-1996 school ycatr. 
Asm, iIk »hi of Mr. and Mrs. 
Clortes McKinney. is a gr^Kluate 
of Kempsville High School, 
Virginia Beach. A senior at 
Tayksr, he ma^ in biok^y C^- 

To be eligible fm die Dewi's 
Sch(4Msh9, a swtoK ma« meet 
mtniiDaB ^ndsds. 



Tracy Reeves 



Two graduate students have 
been selected to receive Patricia 
Roberts Harris Fellowships for 
graduate study at The University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 
for die 1995-96 year. Tracy 
Reeves of Virginia Beach, 
daughter of Ronald and Patricia 
Reeves, was one. She is a 
graduate of Virginia 
Commonwealdi University. 

Both students are working 
toward Master of Fine Arts 
degrees in the Department of 
Dance in die UNCG of HeaUh 
and Human Performwce. 

Tte Hiffris Fellowships awards 
at UNCG cover tuition, fees and 
living expenses for an academic 
year. They are funded by tlw U. S. 
Department of Education. They 
are designed to assist women and 
mincKity grou{» to enter graduate 
{wogiams They program began at 
UNCG in 1%6. 

The federal ftoffitn is named 
for Patricia Roberts Harris, the 
first black woman to attain 
cabinet rank. Within the 
administration of l^esi^nt Jimmy 
Carto^, she was secretary of the 
U. S. De|»rtmeflt of Hcwmg and 
VMm Development ftwi 1977-'^ 
md bom 1979-81 as tta&vtary (tf 
die renuned U. S. DepM^^at ot 
Healdi, Educatoi ud Welfwe. 



At the recent Virginia Junior 
Classical League Convention 
held at Scope on Nov. 5-6, 
Kempsville High School Latin 
students placed in 49 categories, 
the convention was attended by 
students from both public and 
private schools. 

Andrea Wong won Best in 
Show fcs hex Latin Oration. Odier 
first plac^ winners were Maree 
Damm, Esther Huang, Lauren 
Ireland, Katie McDonough, 
Kari Wilson, Amy Lu and 
Joanna Munsey. 

Second place winners were 
Esther Huang, David ReDavid, 
Stephanie Webster, Wendy 
Wiliianis, Marie Robinson and 
VHiitney TenHoeve. 

Third place ribbons were won 
by Natalie Sidner, Brendan 
Cartin, Andrea Wong and Scott 
Sachs. 

Other winners were Cindy 
Lawson. Joy Robinson, Derek 
Bray, Laurie Lawson, Amanda 
Dozier, Chris France, Jennifer 
Dozier, Josh Abrons, Kendra 
Young and Amy Martin. 



The Cox High School Marching 
Fateons finished the 1995 marching 
season undefeated. The drum line 
was undefeated for its second 
consecutive season. In midition, at 
die Virginia Band and Orchestra 
Directors' Association Marching 
Band Festival, the Falcons received 
diree superior ratings for band and 
one for the auxiliary, for an overall 
rating of superior. 

Widi the marching season over, 
die Concert Band, Symphonic Wind 
En^mble and Percussion Ensemble 
are working to prepare for dicir 
winter concert to be l«ld Dec. 19 at 
7 p.m. in the school auditorium. 

Several band members have had 
success in orchestral activities. 
Jennifer Morgan was selected 
timpanii^t for the All Regional 
Orchestra. Joseph Monahan, 
freshman; Nicole Rcntz, senior; 
and, Devin Brccdcn, junior, were 
sel^^ as alternates fcx* trumpet, 
Hute md trombone, respectively. 



Vifcnia Beach Sun. Fridanf. December g. 1Q<W 7 




Clubs 



The Retired Officers Wives' 
Society of Tidewater will hold their 
December Coffee at the Radisson 
Hotel (Starboard Room), 1900 
Pavilion Dr., on Thursday, Dec, 14 
at 10 a.m. Guests are invited. The 
cost is $6. The program will be 
Town and Gown Choral. 



This year, young callers may 
reach Santa or Mrs. Glaus by 
calling 340-GIFr (4438). 623-5040 
or 481-5155. 



The Princess Anne AARP 
Qiapter's annual Christmas potluck 
aiKl installation of new officers is at 
1 p.m. Tuesday. Dec. 12 at the 
Princess Anne Recreation Center. 
1400 Ferrell Pkwy., off General 
Booth Blvd.. Virginia Beach. Call 
426-2302 or 427-3652 for more 
information. 



Princess Anne Woman's Qub of 
Virginia Beach will meet on 
Tuesday. Dec. 12 at 11 a.m. at 
Tandom's Rnc Tree Inn. 



The Beach Democratic Club will 
be hosting its second annual 
Christmas party on Dec. 10 at 
2301-104 Beach Haven Dr., 
Virginia Beach from 5 - 9 p.m. 

The honorable Bobby Vaughan, 
commissioner of revenue, will 
install the newly-elected 1996 
(rfficers. 

Bring a covered dish for everyone 
to share. All interested persons are 
welcome to attend. 

Fot further information call 464- 
0560 or 481-3865. 



Civic 



Hillhaven Rehabilitation and 
Nursing Centers' residents will be 
answering the phones this holiday 
season not as themselves, but as 
Santa and Mrs. Claus. 

Children across Ibmpton Roads 
will be able to talk with Santa or 
Mrs. Claus by way of the Ho Ho 
Hotline beginning on Dec. 12, and 
continuing through Dec. 24, daily 
between the hours of 2 p.m. and 6 
p.m. Three area Hillhaven 
Rehabilition and Nursing Centers 
will participated in the hotline 
IHOgram. 



TO PLACE , .. 

YOUR LEGAL 

ADVERTISEMENT IN 

THE VntlGNIA BEACH SUN 

CALL 486-3430 



r 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



Aaction: 1984 MAZDA GLC 
(5352) 

Serial Number: JM1BD231- 
8EO770748 

AiKtion Date: DECEMBER 18. 
1995 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motw Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy. Norfolk, Va. 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company re- 
sttves the right to bid. 

49-4 
14-12-8 

PUBLIC NOTICE ~| 
Auction: 1979 CHEVROLET 
CAPRICE (5184) 

Serial Number: 1N35G9S20- 
0?49 

Auction Date: DECEMBER 20. 
1995 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Mota Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy. Norfolk. Va. 23518. 

Ncfffolk Motor Company re- 
serves the right to bid. 

49-7 
1+12-8 



r 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



J 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE IN RE: 
DONNA MARIE WEBB. PlaintifF 

V. 

MICHAEL JEFFREY WEBB, 
DefMdant 

(»DER OF PUBLICATION - 
CASE NO. 95-2657 

The object of this suit is to 
obtaiii a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii upon the grounds of 
one year Kpmakm. 

It is ORDl^ED that Michael 
Jeffrey Webb ^>pear uid ptonect 
Ml int««tt, cm or befve January 
29, 1996, wUch (fatte ia ix> «)oner 
dm fifty days afia entry of this 
orIn of iwbliauiai. 

And it is further ORDERED 
Aat Ail onio- of pubUcatim be 
puUiAed once a week f(^ four 
iucceaiive weeks in Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
|Mi«al clrcalaticm in this City 
piMcrflMd by diis cmot 

NovMiber28. 1995 

J. CURTIS FRUIT. CXERK 

By AlMha Lindsey, Deputy 
Oeik 

49-1 
4*11-39 



The Area II Branches of the 
National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People 
will once again sponsor a 
Commemorative Breakfast 
honoring the Rev. Dr. Martin 
Luther King Jr. on Saturday. Jan. 
13 beginning at 8 a.m. in the Scott 
Dozier Dining Hall on the campus 
of Norfolk State UnivCTsity. 

Several local communi^ leaders 
and activists will be recdpized at 
the breakfast for their community 
service during the past 12 months 
in furthering the cause for which 
Dr. King died. Tickets are $10 each 
and may be purchased by calling 
Paul C. Gillis at 538-0991. 



Education 



The Great Neck Middle School 
will present a musical rendition of 
holiday songs on Tuesday, Dec. 19. 
The performance will be held at 7 
p.m. in the school auditorium. 
Students in grades 6, 7 and 8 will 
be participating. 



Let your teacher serve you! Oc^n 
Lakes Elementary School Teachers 
will be at the Burger King on 
General Booth Blvd. on Tuesday, 
Dec.* 18 from 4:30 - 7 p.m. Come 
sufqjoft your school. 



Oa Kfonday. Dec. 11, the second 
grade students at Windsor Oaks 
Elementary School will present a 
holiday program titled "A 
Prehistoric Christmas." The 
musical will be directed by Rebecca 
WhitKHi. Hie fourth and fifth grade 
chorus will also perform holiday 
musKal selections. 

A short PTA meeting will be 
conduct^ at 7 p.m. followed by the 
program. In addition, from 5:45 - 
6:45 p.m. and immediately 
following the program, children 
may visit with Santa and have their 
picture taken widi him. 



December. There are a group of 
students who play hand chimes. 

Several kindergarten classes are 
having a "Family Day" on Dec. 14 
to celebrate the holidays in 
iDecember and the importance of 
^amily. Students invite a family 
lembw to school to make a aaft. 
It a snack and sing songs. The 
orning students' activities are 
rom 10-11 a.m., and the children 
the afternoon classes have their 
program from 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. 

\rhc SO As project for December 
is (pollecting presents for children 
whipse parents might not be able to 
provide gifus. Those children who 
wodid like to participate are asked 
to wing in a wrapped gift for a 
child. The project begins Dec. 11 
and nms until the holiday v^ation. 



The Salem Middle School Book 
Fair is scheduled for Dec. 11-15 
from 7:30 a.m. - 3:15 p.m. daily in 
the Library Media Center. Parenu 
are encouraged to come by and 
preview die materials for purchase 
on Dec. 8 from 1 - 2:35 p.m. Also, 
the book Fair will be open Dec. 11. 
6:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

The Dec. 8 Holiday Dance will 
be held in the Salem Middle 
cafeteria 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. On 
Wednesday. Jan 17. Salem Middle 
will be having its annual Parent's 
Day. I^uents who attend will go to 
classes, activities and lunch with 
their sons/daughters. 



Kemps Landing Magnet School 
is now accepting applications for 
the 1996-97 school year. KLMS is 
a five-day-a-week program for gifted 
students in grades six, seven and 
eight. Applications are available in 
the offices of Kemps Landing 
Magnet School, Old Donation 
Center for the Gifted and Talented 
and Virginia Beach Neighborhood 
schools. The application deadline is 
Feb. 15. For further information, 
call Mrs. Feher at KLMS. 473- 
5665. 



Tha fifth grade chorus at B.F. 
Williams Elementary, under the 
direct^n of Jacquelyn Coleman, 
music iteacher and Teacher of the 
Year sk Williams, will perform a 
selecdqn of winter holiday songs in 
the dining hall of Sentara Bayside 
Human^ Hospital, their Adopt-A- 
Schooli Partner, on Dec. 13 at 
11:45 a.hi. 



p.m. on Thursday. Dec. 14. and 
admission is $1. Dtm't miss this 
once in a lifetime (q>p(»tunity to 
see Santa catchin' a wave. 



Health 



Virginia Beach Health 
Department Community Services 
Team will be offering blood 
pressure checks for adults and 
immunizations fof children in the 
Mobile Clinic Van at these two 
locations in December 

■ Monday. Dec. 18. 1 - 3 p.m.. 
Princess Anne Recreation Center 
paridng lou and. 

■ Tuesday, Dec. 19, 1 - 3 p.m., 
Windsor Woods Library parking 
lot. 

Children needing immunizations 
must come with their 
immunization records. For further 
information, call the Health 
department Community Services 
Team at 491-5161. 






On Monday, Dec. 18 at 7 p.m. in 
the Linkhorn Park Elementary 
School cafeteria, the founh and fifth 
grade chorus will present a program 
of holiday music. Following the 
chorus' program, the second grade 
classes of Martha Wilson and 
Frances Sellew will present a 
holiday play/musical, "The Elf 
Factory." 



Great Neck Middle School will 
have its annual Winter Breakfast for 
the staff on Dec. 19. The school's 
adopt-a-school partners have been 
invited to share in this beautiful 
event. The breakfast will be held in 
the school cafeteria at 7 a.m . " 

I PUBLIC NOTICE 

Talal liWice thaf ai t2fn/9S, 
at 10:00 A.M. at the {romises of 
4747 Shore Dr. Va. Beach, Va. 
the undesigned will sell at Public 
Auction, f(ff cash, reserving unto 
itself the right to bid, the fol- 
lowing vehicle. 1988 Dodge Aries 
Serial #1B3BD46KXJC241417 



On Dec. 12 at 7:30 in the 
Trantwood Elementary School 
cafeteria, the fifth grade chorus and 
morning kindergarten classes are 
presenting a program. "December in 
Our Town." The program shows a 
variety of cultural celebrations that 
occur during the month of 



The fdurih and fifth grade chorus 
at Parkway Elementary will 
perform iis annual holiday program 
at the Hillhaven Holmes Health 
care Ccrttcr on Bonney Road in 
Virginia Beach on Thursday. Dec. 
14 from jO: 30 -11:30 a.m. 

The prcfgram is tided "December 
in Our T|)wn" by Roger Emerson. 
It's a mluliicuilural celebration 
including a Mexican Fiesta. African 
Kwanzaa Festival, Hanukkah Party, 
Chrisima.s Pageant and Rock and 
Roil Sania with his elves. Thej 
school assemblies will be held on 
Dec. 11-12 during the day. On 
Tuesday, Dec. 12, the program will 
be performed for the PTA in the 
school cafeiorium. 



The Virginia Beach Health 
Department in cooperation widi die 
Bow Creek Recreation Center, will 
be offering "Health Facts and 
Aquacisc," a health information 
program offered in conjunction with 
at water exercise class. 

The second half of each session 
will be water exercise instruction 
conducted by the Aquatics Unit of 
Bow Creek Recreation Center. The 
program will be held on Monday 
nights from 7 - 8 p.m. at Bow 
Creek Recreation Center, 3427 
Clubhouse Rd., starting Jan. 8. The 
cost of the entire program is $25. 
BTo register for for more 
Information, call Shariene Keeling 
at 491-5161. 



held on Dec. 9 from 1:30 • 3:30 
p.m. This clinic is a "walk-in" 
clinic; no n^ for an appointhfiwit! 
Immunizations to be given include 
DTP, DTP/HIB, DT, DTaP, TD, 
OPV, MMR, HIB AND Hepatitis 
b. All childhood immunizations are 
no charge. Please bring your child's 
immunization record with you. 

The Virginia Beach Health 
Department and Sentara Bayside 
Hospital encourage parents to use 
one provider for all dieir child's 
healUi care needs. However, when 
insurance does not pay for 
immunizations, and also encourage 
using a familiar and trusted place 
where experienced nurses can 
jBovide this service. 



Recreation 



A Hanukkah program will be 
presented at the Windsor Woods 
Area Library (3612 S. Plaza Trail) 
on Thursday, Dec. 14 at 7 p.m. for 
children ages 4 to 7. This program 
will celebrate Hanukkah, the 
Festival of Lights, widi stories and 
games. Registration is required and 
is limited to 25 people. Call 340- 
1043 to register. 



The Pungo-Blackwater Library 
(922 Princess Anne Rd.) will hold a 
storytime entitled "Cold North 
Woods" for children ages 3 to 5 
years old to enjoy. This program 
will be held on Thursday, Dec, 14 
at 10:30 a.m. 



^utTs up, dude! Catch a wave to 
Bayside Sixdi Grade Campus. 4722 
Jericho Rd.. where die Drama Club 
is putting on an exhilarating 
production of "Surfin's Saita." The 
curtain will go up promptiy at 7 



The Virginia Beach Health 
Department, togedier with Sentara 
Bayside Hospital, is offering free 
and convenient Childhood 
Immunizations. The second 
Saturday of every momH>an 
immunization clinic will be held 
for children in the cafeteria at 
Senffara Bayside Hospital at 800 
Independence Blvd. in Virginia 
Beach. 

The next scheduled clinic will be 



The Virginia Beach Chorale, 
under die direction of Lou Sawyer, 
will present tiieir annual holiday 
concert on Sunday, Dec. 17 at 2:30 
p.m. in die Virginia Beach Pavilion 
Convention Center Theater. 

Tickets are $6 for adults and S5 
for students and senior citizens. 



Religion 



On Sunday. Dec. 10 from 1 1 
a.m. - noon. Eckankar will host a 
worship service at the Virginia 
Beach Pavilion. The Uieme will be 
"Life Becomes Richer. Not Easier." 
For more information on Uiis ECK 
Worship Service, call 552-7688. 




PUBLIC NOTICE 



C 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



NOTICE OF SERVICE OF 
PROCESS BY PUBLICATION 
STATE OF NORTH CAROUNA 
COUNTY OF MECKLENBURG 

IN THE DISTRICT COURT 
BEFORE THE CLERK 95-SP- 
1683 

IN THE MATTER OF THE 
ADOPTION OF IAN HUNTER 
ELLIOTT. A MINOR CHILD 
BORN TO BARBARA JEAN 
MCRAEELUOTT 

TO: MARK HAM- 
MOND/MARK HAMMOND 
AND/OR ALL PUTATIVE 
FATHERS OF IAN HUNTER EL- 

uorr 

TAKE NOTICE that a pleading 
seeking relief against you has 
been filed in Uie above entitled 
special proceeding. The nature of 
the relief being sought is as 
ftdlows: 

A hearing has bMn xt before 
die Court at 10:00 a.m. on die 4di 
day of Janumy, 1996, or as soon 
thereafter as counsel can be heard 
for an ordet pui^uant to N,C.G.S. 
48-6 allowing the adoption by 
petitioners KELVIN SEBRON 
BRYANT and PATRICE LAS- 
SITER BRYANT of IAN HUN- 
TER ELLIOTT, a minor child 
bom to BARBARA JEAN MC- 
RAE ELLIOTT, to proceed 
without the consent of the 
putative father of die child. Said 
hearing will be held in the office 
of the Clok of Superior Court. 
Qvil Courts Building, Suite 101, 
800 E. 4tii St.. Charlotte, N.C. 
2820Z 

You are required to make 
defense to such plewUng noi later 
than January 17Ui. 1996 nd upon 
your failure to do w the parties 
seeking service against you will 
Kpply to die Court for Uie relief 

SDUg^L 

Tljis tiw 29th day of Novemb«. 
1995. 

W, I^vid Thurman 

BUSH, THURMAN & WUson, 
PA 

N.C.B* No. 11117 

Ml East Ttade S&eet 

Charlotte, North Carolina 
28202 

(704) 377-4164 

49-5 
3+12-22 



Take notice that on December 
11, 1995, at 10:00 A.M. at die 
IM-emises of 4747 Shore Dr. Va. 
Beach, Va. the undersigned will 
sell at Public Auction, for cash, 
reserving unto itself the right to 
bid, tiie following vehicle, 1984 
Ford E-350 Van Serial #1FTHE- 
36YOEHB72945 

49-1 
1+12-8 

I PUBLIC NOTICE "1 

Auction: 1985 CHRYSLER 
LASER (6795) 

Serial Number: 1C3BA44D- 
HEG245754 

Auction Date: DECEMBER 18, 
1995 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy., Norf^olk, Va. 23518. Norfolk 
Motor Company reserves the right 
to bid. 

49-3 
1+12-8 

PUBLIC NOTICE j 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
,GINIA BEACH m die 17di day of 
Nov.. 1995 

IN RE: ESTATE OF JOSEPH 
R. GREEN. JR., DECEASED 

Chancery No. CH95-1021 

Probate File No. 93-394 

SHOW CAUSE AGAINST DIS- 
TRIBUTION ORDER 

This date came Patricia G. 
Bowling, Administratrix of Estate 
of Joseph R, Green Jr.. deceased 
("Petitioner"), by counsel, upon 
her Amended lotion previously 
filed in this matter and. for good 
cause shown, it is hereby OR- 
DERED Uiat die creditors of. and 
all odiers interested in. die Estate 
of Joseph R. Green. Jr.. deceased, 
shall show cause, if Uicy can. on 
die 15 day of December, 1995 at 
9:30 AM before Uiis Court, why 
previous distributions of die assets 
of die Estate should not be ap- 
pitjved and why remaining assets 
of the Estate should not be dis- 
^buted to die beneficiaries, upon 
ex«;ution and delivery of re- 
funding bontb. 

It is further ORDERED diat die 
foregoing portion of diis Ord» 
shall be published once a week 
for two successive w^u in the 
Virginia Beach Sun. a newsi^)^ 
in Virginia Beach, VA, it 



appearing that a report of the 
accounts of die Petitioner and of 
the debts and demands against 
die Estate have been filed in the 
Clerk's OJfice, and that six 
months have elapsed since the 
qualification of the Petitioner. 

Enter: 11/17/95 

Circuit Court Judge 'A.B. 
Shockley 

Certified to be a TRUE COPY 

of record in my custody. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

Circuit Court. Virginia Beach. 
Va. 

BY: Jeanette S. Jones 

Deputy Clerk 

I ask for this: 

Jeffrey T. Talbert 

State Bar No. 18068 

Shuttleworth, Ruloff & Gior- 
dano. P.C. 

4425 Corporation Lane. Suite 
300 

Virginia Beach. VA 23462 

Phone: (804) 671-6000 

Fax: (804) 671-6003 

Counsel for Petitioner 

48-2 
2+12-8 



r 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



] 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFHCE 
IN RE: Vicki Yv(mne Pratko 
Piaintiff(s) 

V, William Roy I^dco 
Defendant(s) 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION - 
CASENO.CH95-3809 

The object of diis suit is (fw): 
the said plaintiff to obtain a 
divorce A Vinculo Matrimonii 
from die said defendant, upon die 
grounds of having lived s^mrate 
and apart without any coha- 
bitation and witiiout any inter- 
ruptim for a period in excess of 
one year, to wit: 8 years. 

It is ORDERED tiiat William 
Roy PraUco a^iear and protect 
(his) interest, on or before Jan- 
uary 11, 1996. which date it no 
so<m» Uian fifty da^ ^ter entry 
of Uus otto (tf publtei^at. 

And it is furUier ORDERED 
tiiat this order of publication be 
publish^ once a week for four 
successive weeks in Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of gen- 
eral circulation in tiiis City pre- 
Kribcd by diis court 
November 20, 1995 



J. CURTIS FRUIT. CLERK 
By Phyllis N. Styron 
Deputy Clerk 

48-3 
4+12-2 

I PUBLIC NOTICE j 

VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERKS OFFICE 

IN RE: Janet Osborne Rislcy. 
Plaintiff 

V. Stephen Cordner Risley. 
Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICA-nON ■ 
CASE NO. CH95-3736 

The object of tiiis suit is (to) 
(for) Divorce - 1 year separation. 

It is ORDERED that Stephen 
Cordner Risley appear and protect 
his interest, on or before January 

8. 1996, which date is no sooner 
dian fifty days after entry of diis 
order of publication. 

And it is furdier ORDERED 
that diis order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this City 
prescribed by diis court. 

November 15, 1995 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By Alexia Lindsey, 

Deputy Cleric 

i Public Nolle* 1 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR 
THE STATE OF ALASKA AT 
BETHEL 

In die Matter of die Dissolution 
of die Marriage of 

LEign ANN HENDERSON and 
CARLOS E. HENDERSON, JR, 
Husband and Wife CASE NO. 
4BE-95-274-C1 

NOTICE TO ABSENT SPOUSE 

TO: CARLOS E. 

HENDERSON. JR. (Absent 
Spouse) 

You are hereby notified diat a 
Petition for Dissolution of 
Mairiage was filed by LEIGH 
ANN HENDERSON on October 4. 
1995. 

The petition sutes that an 

incompatibility of tempenment 
has caused the irremediable 
breakdown of your manri^e and 
that your whereabouts are 
unloKnm. 

You must make your 
wha«ib(WB known lo tlw cmfft at 



this address: Bethel Trial Court 
P.O. Box 130 Bediel, AK 99559. 

Failure to do so within 30 days 
after die last date of publication/ 
posting of diis notice may result 
in the court granting a decree of 
dissolution , of marriage as 
requested in die petition. 

Date October 4. 1995. CLERK 
OF COURT Tanya R. Grant. 
Deputy 



c 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH on the 17tii 
day of Nov., 1995 

Re: Estate of Marjorie F. 
Daniel 
Fiduciary No, 95-120 
Chancery No. CH95-3770 
SHOW CAIISR nBnpp 

It appearing diat a report of die 
accounts of Thomas C. Broyles, 
Executor of the Estate of the 
Estate of Marjorie F. Daniel, de- 
ceased, and of the debts and de- 
mands against her estate has been 
filed in the Clerk's Office, and 
diat six (6) months have elapsed 
since the quaiificaiion, on motion 
of Thomas C. Broyles, Executor 
IT IS ORDERED that the cre- 
ditOTS of, and all odiers interested 
in, die Estate do show cause, if 
any diey can. on die 15th day of 
December. 1995, at 9:30 a.m.. or 
as soon thereafter as counsel may 
be heard, before diis Court at its 
couruoom. against the payment 
and delivery of the Estate of 
Marjorie F. Daniel, deceased, to 
the residuary beneficiaries with- 
out requiring refunding bfflids. 

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED 
that this Show Cause Order be 
published once a week for two 
successive weeks in TAe Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of gen- 
eral circulation in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 

ENTER: NOV 17 1995 

TTuMnas C. Broyles, Esq. 

Kaufman & Canolcs, P.C. 

P.O. Box 3037 

Norf'oUcV A 23514-3037 

Certified to be a TRUE COPY 

of fKord in my cusuidy. 

J. Curtis Fruil, Clerk 

Circuit Court. Virginia BeKh, 
Va. 

BY: Jeanette S. Jwies 

Deputy Clerk 

48-4 
2+12-8 



] 



^^^■■■^ 



^^m^m^^^^^^^fK^mmmmmmmmmm^mt 



« <- 



8 Virginia Beach Sun. Riday. D«:enibCT 8. 1995 



KB 



Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

iMme 
2times 
4 times 



20 Words 
Qcleas 


$7.50 
$ 13.50 
$22.50 



Xdditiaial 
words 

.35 

.70 

1.40 



Run ^ourClasstfied^ftMirUmes for only $22.50. You can carnal 
your ad at any time. 

AB Classilisd Alls nm in three newsiMpera (The Vbginia Beach Sun. Tire Chesap- 
eato Post end The (H>rttin«4h Tunes). No additional dmy. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 








































20woni8 



Run my art lor ______ 

Payment is enclosed $ . 



issues. 



Maiw cheek peyaUe to Byeriy PubOeatione 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23327 

Name_ 

AcJdress 

City 

FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571 . 

COMBINATION RATE: Run Ml MTM pMMMl ad ki my oSwr Byirly PuMnUani imwpimf lor an 
addUond 13 on* tm. tS nw tknw, 17 iour tnrn. M— ipipm In FranMn, Enporia. UMrancavHa. 
Onwiddii am) Patmbws. CaU S47-4S71 for (Mab. 



AIRLINE TICKETS 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



One way, anytime, anywhere in 
U.S. $300. Roundtrip no advance 
for $425. Can 1-800-925-4704 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



$ SAVE $ SLASH YOUR 
GROCERY HLLS BY UP TO 50%. 

CALL R)R DETAILS: 804*340- 
5234. 12/15 

ASTROLOGY SERVICES 

Your personal computer horo- 
scope, no 900 *'s. For information 
Send $2.00/ ralunded first order 
to: CEMA 522 Austin St. Norfolk 
Va. 23503. 12« 

SELECTIVE SINGLES DANCE 
EVERY MONDAY! 

Dating services are not for us I 
Biggest singles party in Tidewater 
for the over 28 career singles. 
7:00 til midnight. Dress casual! Tell 
a single friendl Mitty's, Omni 
Newport News Hotel, $5. l-64/Exit 
258-A. 804-249-5452, Lila. 
12/29 



Mormons, JWs. Masonry, New 
Age; What do they realty tjelieve? 
For free booklet call CornerStone 
Ministries at 1-868-0793. 12j« 



"DONATE"CARS" 

••BOATS"RVS** 

"TRUCKS" 

Jewish Heritage for the Blind. Tax 

deductil}le. Ptompi pick-up. 

NEED NOT RUN. 

1-800-2-DONATE 

1-800-236-6283 

" DONT DRINK THE WATER" 

Counter top water treatment 
system. Filters out Chtorlne, lead 
and many other common water 
pollutants up to 10,000 gallons. 
NTL tested. 99% reduction 
Guaranteed. Easy to install. 
Christmas special 199.95 imdudes 
shipping and handling. Please 
send check or money order to 
Damon P.O. Box 62382 Va 
Beach, Va 23466 or call 579- 
1452. for free home demo. 

12/29 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



Fisher Price kitchen set $20.00. 
Baby crib { no hardware or mat- 
tress ) $20.00. Full size waterbad 
mattress, with headtntard $75.00. 
1 box of assorted paper back 
books $3.00. Call 399-7907 after 
6 p.m. Monday - Friday. 

Bassinet white only 2 1/2 months 
$30. Call Julie work 547-4571 
home 398-0902. tfn 



Service Directory 



AUTO SERVICE 



PAINTING / DECORATING 



BALDWIN TOWING 

Flat bed servk» $30 

Days 545-6002. 

Evenings, beeper 578-9581 

Junk cars bought $50 & up. 

12/8 



CHILD CARE 



HERITAGE PAINTING CO. 

Interiors, Exterfors, 

Power Washing, Decks, 

Sheet Rock Repairs. Spackling. 

Licensed/ Insured 

Free Estimates 

Excellence is our trademark 

436-3268 

12^ 



GREAT BRIDGE AREA- ChiM care 
in my home, all ages. Full-time, 
Part-time. Me^ls & snacks 
provided. Plenty W actlvittes, fully 
supervised. Licensed/ insured. 
non-smoker. Quality care in a 
family home. Call anytime 482- 
4265 or 5l9-4(%7. pager. 12/22 

INDIAN RIVER/ KEMWSVIUE- 

Licensed, educatbn. prdesstonal, 
USDA. Fenced in yanl tf meals 
and snsKdcs. Degreed t^^iw plus 
friendly home environment. 3 
openings 366-4455 Claire. 



POWER WASHING 



PRESSURE CLEANERS 

2500 - $599. 3200 • $899, 

Hondas, 13hp, 3200 PSI, $1198. 

400 PSI, $1699. Call for Factory 

Direct Catatog. 

24/hrs Overnight Delivery. 1-800- 

917.WASH{9274) 



PROFE^IONAL SERVICES 



CLEANING / JANITORIAL SVC 



Cleaning- Professonal cleaning, at 
reasonable rates, nove out , 
ww«tows. C«R Eliz 484-4»«. 



&mta for Clirlstfint 

prwale F»rtws, 

iKMJse vsits 

4 yrs. experience m 

Lynnhaven Mall. 

Cal 471*6-« wk. 427-44^ 

12^2 



PROFi^lONAL SCf^l^S 



For IwuM (»lto t ^^M 
CtM $43-7447 



Disc jockeys available for 
Christmas & New years ^itiM. 
w«fc«i^ rw^lMim ete. ««^ 
tf $175, contact F^« or DuruN m 
•57-7749. Gospel groups 
at^NAle for fund raisers. Bands 
^av^^. 12/22 



Pine Thomasville dinning room 
table and chairs, 2 arm chairs, all 
chairs with padding plus 2 extra 
leaves for table. $1000 or best 
offer. 482-1428. tfn 

Queen- size wateriMd for saft. Six 
drawer pedestal with three 
cabinets. Headboard with mirror 
and 2 lamps. Mattress pad, 
bumper rails and heater included 
in price. $350.00. Call ^9-9316. 
tfns 

Sears 15.5 HP 42" cut riding lawn 
tractor. Run less than 50 hours. 
$1500 negotiable. 429-9132 
before 9 pm. tfnst 

Kenmore Refrigerator, skfe t^ skle 
$375 OBO, 3 wheel electrk: cart/ 
whaetehair, w/ battery & power 
charger w/ crutch holder in good 
condition $400 OBO 451-3105. 
Daybed - White iron & brass, W/2 
Orthopedic Mattress, still in plastic, 
pop up trundle. Cost $ 800 sell for 
$325. Call 481-6748. 12/8 

Bed Brass - Queen size with 
orthopedic mattress set. Still in 
plastic. Cost $1,000 sell for $300. 
Call 481 -71 91. ,12/8 



ANTIQUES / COLLECTIBLES 



ANTIQUES- 10,000 SQUARE FT. 

of artglass, furniture, paintings, 

clocks, much more! 

1804Granby St. 

622-0905 dir. 

12/15 



BARBIES WANTED 

Collector buying' Barbie, Francie, 
Skipper, dolls & clothes 1959- 
1972. 467-4879. 

COLLECTIBLE JEWELRY- Rings, 
watches, broaches, pendants 
necklaces, bracelets and rare 
costume pieces. Made of 14K & 
19K, sterling and diamonds, 
emeralds, ruby's, amethysts and 
other beautiful stones. Great 
Christmas gifts at bargain prices. 
Call 482-4147. 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



Ferrari- 19M- 328 red. 
$3,000 dollar stereo, telephone, 
radar. 17,000 miles, excellent 
condition. 46,000. Bob 804-295- 
8040. 12/15 



AUTOS / JUNK - WANTED 



D&D TOWING 
Professional wrecker services, 
AAA approved- 24 hours. Local 
tows $25.00. Cash for cars any 
condition. Licensed/ Certified/ 
Insured. Call DO TOW ME (368- 
0963) 12/15 

$$ CASH PAID $$ 

For vehicles, 1980 and up, with 
bad engines, bad transmissions or 
wrecked. Some exceptions. Call 
456-0057. 12/8 

AAA-1 AUTO JUNK 

Junked or wrecked call for top 
prices. Ihr. pickup. 545-6002. 

AUTOS ACCEPTED 

any make, year or rondKkjn 

TOP $$$ 

FAST FREE TOWING! 

545-2821 

12/8 

JUNK CARS 

Peck Recycling now buying whole 
cars at Elm Ave. Ports. VA. Call 
399-4075 for info. 12^ 



BOATS 



TIERRA- 1985 - 27 FT 

Continental, twin volvo, every 
option, excellent condition, 81 
original hours. &}b 804-295-8040 

12/15 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



Steel building business is 
boomingll National Manufacturer 
is quaNfying dealers in select open 
markets. B^| profits on sales ifKl/ 
or cenMructk)n. Call (303) 759- 
3200, ext. 2300. 12/8 



Executive Search- A well 
established health car* tympany 
opens new divwkin p<risad in the 
Preventive Health Care Martcat. 
Seeking several indivkluals to 
head up eiquMSwn in TMMrtfer 
area. For Mmmmkan tm^ rMum* 
to: Kim Mu^y, Persmnel, 1719 
Birch Trail Circle, Suite E, 
ClMS^Make. Va. S^O. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS 



PERSONALIZED CHILDREN'S 
STORYBOOKS. Great presents 
for holidays, birthdays, etc. Find 
out about this hot- selling gift! 
Amazing recorded message gives 
details. 468-1561, ext. 106. 

12/15 



CLASSES / SCHOOLS 



Train to be Aviation Mechanic 

in Pampano Beach, FL 

For January 29th class, 60 weeks 

Training, Financial aid 

and housing available. 

Job placement assistance 

Call Pompano Academy 

1-800-545-7262 

12/29 

BARMASTERS OF VA BEACH 
Bartending school 

1141 Independence Blvd. 1-2 wks 
day / evening classes Job/ place- 
ment assistance. Lowest tuition in 
area. For Free Class / 464-0500. 

12/15 



COINS / STAMPS / HOBBIES 



BUY SELL COINS ■ Gold & Silver 
items. Military items & other 
collectibles. Collectors Choice, 
5441 Va. Beach Blvd. 497-5950. 

12/8 



COMPUTERS / EQUIPMENT 



MEGA CONSULTANTS- HOME 
TUTOR SERVICE- Windows. Dos, 
Internet, Computer set up. Mon- 
Sat. 9am -epm. 855-8389. 

ALL PC 

REPAIRS AND UPGRADES 

HOUSECALLS 

PC DOC 456-9095 



ENTERTAINMENT 



ALL STARZ ENTERTAINMENT 

High class ladies for private 
parties, dancing, dining, massage 
and more! DON'T HESITATE 
CALL FOR THE BEST. 499-0865 

12/15 

AFTER 6 437-M92 

Professk)nal Exotic male/ female 
dancers and masseuse on call 
24hrsl! DONT CALL THE REST- 
WE'VE GOT THE BEST! Available 
for clubs/ private parties. 12/15 



FARM /LAND /TIMBER 



CAMDEN COUNTY, NC 

312 acres wooded, 

48 acres dearad. 

Sealed bkis only through 12/7/95 

NO LOTS 

Micheal D. Neal 919-356-2747 



WAVERLY- 36 ACRES 

in town. Part wooded. Rd. 
Frontage. 39,900. 10% down. 
Owner 804-949-0099. 



SUSSEX COUNTY- 60 ACRES 

Rd. Frontage. 85 mis. to Va. 
Be»:h $49,900. Owner 804-949- 
0099. 

ABSOLUTE STEAL 
2.25 ACRES- $12^90 
Minutes to Chesapeake Bay- 
Beautifully WKioded in charming 
country setting. Ready to buiki on 
state road. Includes ownership of 
private dock and pier. Excellent 
financing. Call now 1-800-775- 
4563 ext. 6399. 



LANDBARGAM 

37« ACRES $S4.W0 

MWSTSELLI 

Owner needs cash. 15 «?es crop 
land. Balance v^ioded. Suffolk. 
Terms. «54-826-S«<S. 

52.372 acre farm house 'and out 
buildings for ssia in a h^hly 
desirable neighborhood of 
SoiMtMmpriott CourMy. Um^ r»^ 
froflt^e. H interasted, eaN 804- 
562-5133. 



FIREWOOD /FUELS 



EXTRA(»«»NARY CAREBI OPP- 
ORTUNITY. Available with the 
fastest growing telecomm- 
unications company in America. 
Motivated self starters, who desire 
their own business needed 496- 
9037. 12/8 

Either you want to have personal 
and financial fr«e<tom in the next 
36 months or you ttonll If you do 
it only takes a phone call. If you 
don't respond to this ad, in 6 
months, You'll wish you h«ll 465- 
0806. 



Firewood- 95% oak cut, split $ 
delivered. 1 ton p»kup. Call 804- 
860-8046. 12/8 



HELP WANTED 



DRIVERS 

$ HOLIDAY CASH$ 

$150 PERDAY 
Earning Potential 
Wori< your own hours. Be your 
own boss. Must be 23 yrs. Good 
DMV record. Norfolk Checker T^i. 
855-9009, ask for Bob Jones. 
12/15 

PAY 
ATTENTION 

Last year I graduated from 
(Allege and was frustrated with the 
lack of opportunities in todays Job 
market. Then I met a millionaire 
and my last months check was 
over $3,000.00! 5 career minded 
individuals needed now! Call 468- 
2173. 12/15 

NOW STAFFING 

International company expanding 
into Tidewater area, need reps/ 
trainers/ managers. Extensive 
training provided, opportunity for 
travel available. 468-0890 12/15 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 

Hiring IMMEDIATELY, will train, 
flexible shifts starting at 5. 5:30 & 
6 pm. Incentive raises & new 
employee bonus. Lynnhaven 
area. Call Nancy 468-4002. 
12/15 

TRAIN TO BE AVIATION 
MECHANIC IN POMPANOBEACH 
FL FOR JANUARY 29TH CUSS, 
60 WEEKS, TRAINING. 
FINANCIAL AID AND HOUSING 
AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT 
ASSISTANCE 1-800-545-7262. 
12/29 

COMMUNICATIONS-Natbnal firm, 
expanding in Tidewater area. 
Saeking sharp, highly motivated 
individuals with good public skills. 
Call 368-0848. 12/15 

Brand New Offiee 

All positions to staff entire office, 
17 people needed immediately 
WE TRAIN !!! Must be 18 or older, 
have car and available now. If 
you're not making $7/hr. Call Ron 
at 466-8580. 12/8 

COLLECTORS 

For law firm 

Experience required. 

Part-time evenings and Saturdays 

Call Mrs. Stampe 490-6292. 

12/15 

"* HO! HO! HO! *" 

TELEMARKETING- CALL 

CENTER 

Don't Wait Until After The 
Holidays, Earn Your $$$ NOW. 
Seeking enthusiastic individuals 
with a great phone voice and a 
personality to match. Permanent 
Part time Positions with Day and 
Evening hours available. Paid 
Training and Daily $$$ Incentives. 
Call 368-0273. ' 12/8 

TEXAS REFINERY CORP.- needs 
mature (responsible) person now 
in CHESAPEAKE area. 
Regardless of training, write W.B. 
Hopkins, Dept. w-23320. Box 711, 
Ft. Worth, TX. 76101. 12/8 

WORK AT HOME-EARN $500 
WEEKLY. Selling a long distance 
service over the phone. Paid 
weekly, monthly bonus. No 
experience necessary- will train. 
Please call 1-800-842-1409. 

• POSTAL JOBS • 

12.68/ hr to start, plus benefits. 
Carriers, sorters, computer 
trainees. For an application and , 
exam information, call 1-219-791- 
1191, ext. p43 9am-9pm 7 days. 
12/8 

CHRISTMAS HELP 

Part-time, some full-time. Starting 
pay $10.15, good for daywort<ers. 
second income and students. 
Flexible schedules. No experience 
necessary, training provhfed 460- 
5600. 12/1 

TEXAS REFINERY CORP. 
needs mature (responsible) 
person now in PORTSMOUTH 
area. Regardless of training, write 
W.A. HofAlns, Dept. W-23705. 
Box 711, Ft. Worth, TX 76101. 

A-1 OPPORTUrffTY - AVON 

Sell quality products - home, 
workplaces, flexible hours - 
supplement income. Potential 
$200-$1.000 + monthly. Avon ind, 
sales rep. 1-800-962-4998. 



HELP WANTED 



HANDYMAN NEEDED 

in exchange for free room & 
board (garage apartment). Need 
some experience with 
maintenance, carpentry, 
plumbing, electrial, etc.... Call 491- 
1959. 

BABY SITTER NEEDED- For 
occasional nights out (2-3 a 
weak) 3 children ages 5 yrs, 6 
yrs, snd 9 months. Oldtr 2 
usually asltcp. Must bt 
dependable. Pless* call Julls 
Wk. 547-4571, hm 39B-0902. 

We are looking for a few energetk: 
people to sell subscriptions to 
three local publications. If 
Interested call Julls at 547-<«7l. 

TELEPHONE SALES 

Established business in Great 
Bridge area of Chesapeake is 
seeking full-time or part-time 
telephone solicitors. Experience 
prefered. but not neces sary. Y ou 
must have good spelling ability, 
legible handwritting and an 
intelligent wlllingnsss to learn. 
Most important you must enjoy 
dealing with the public by 
telephone . You should live in or 
near the Great Brklge area. Salary 
is based on hours worked. If 
interested, please write fully, giving 
your qualifications to: Telephone 
Solicitor, P.O. box 1327. 
Chesapeake, Va. 23327. 

MARKETING 

International brokerage firm has 5 

openings. Applicants must be fun 

& people oriented. Unlimited 

potential $50,000 -f Call 423- 

7275. 



HORSES /CATTLE ETC 



SEEKING PRIVATE BOARD- For 

2 sweet old riding horses. Feed 
supplied. Call 549-1898. 12^ 

Angus Bulls- Service age, call 
Lawerenceville 804-848-2621. 



HOMES /SALE 



J^AVIDSMILL CHESAPEAKE- 

Nearly new 4 bedroom ranch w/ 
garage on 1/4 acre lot. Western 
Branch schools. 129.900 Alice 
Watson 523-2121 or 721-3012. 
Century 21 Accord. 

Norfolk Highlands- 1116 Hawthorn 
Dr. New custom built. 3 bedroom, 
2 bath, attach garage, 
maintenance free. Brick skirted, 
vaulted ceilings, recess lighting. 
Open house Sat's & Sun's 1-4. 
Pefley Real Estate Corp. 425- 
6916 or 629-9992. ■ 

ALL CLOSING COST PAID 

on any VA/HUD owned home, vet 
or non-vet. Bobby Scott & 
Associates Real Estate 490-7826. 

12/15 



LOANS /MORTGAGES 



HOME OWNERS 

Ws have ths bert 

rates In town. 

All credit considered. 

1st. 2nd, 3rd Mort^es. 

Very Low Payments 

Consolkfate Bills. 

No Equky? 

BankrufMcy OKI 

Call 1-800-664-6779 

Bill or Lewis 

INFINITY FUNDING CORP. 

12/22 

FAST CASH 
for HOMEOWNERS 

All credit consklered. 
1st, 2nd, 3rd Mortgages. Low 
rates. Low payments. 
Consolkiata bilte. 

No Equity? 

Bankruptcy OK. 

Call 1-800-254-9506 

Jeff Rusch 

UNITED SOUTHERN MORTAGE 

12/8 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CURRITUCK COUNTY- 5 chokie 
buiMing lots. Some wooded. Near 
the Cotton Gin at Jarvisburg. 
Priced to sell. $18,500 ea. Bill 
Robbins 1-919-453-2126 days 1- 
919-453-6950 eves. 12^9 



MASSAGE 



ABSOLUTELY DIVINt 

Therapeutic massage mm 
availi^ m super convenient 

C^s^jsake footionl 

Professbnal, ABMP Ceitifwd. 

GFT CERTFICATESI 

Can Paula 437-0921 or 629-7838 

pager, 12/15 



.*, » 



Virginia Be«:h Sun. RJAy, Deaanhg 8, 19QS < 



Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



MASSAGE 



MOTORCYCLES 



MASSAGE BY TMJ 

Carpal Tunnel, headachss, back 
pains, whiplash, arthritis, hernias, 
chronic pains, fatigue, hip/ leg 
problems. Aaron 428-6923, Emily 
747-0365. 12/29 

ATLANTIS BODY WORKS 
Massage, Deep tissue, 
relaxing. Reflexology, Yoga 
therai:^. Professionally trained. 
CHRISTMAS GIFT CERTIFI- 
CATES AVAILABLE! Call 
Micheal, 481-1472. 12/1 

SOAR INTO AN EASEFUL AND 
RESTFUL MASSAGE. For 

physical comfort and relaxation 
purposes. Ethical/ Call Leanne or 
Erica at 366-0226. 12/1 



MiSC FOR SALE 



MOBILE HOMES / RENT 



GATES, NO- 3 BDRM/ 2 BATH 

Quiet neighborhood Hwy 13 S., 5 
min/ VA line. Lot rent/ Water 
included. Available now! Call 1- 
919-357-0310. 11/24 



MOBILE HOMES /SALE 



2 Bedroom Furnished 

Portsmouth area $ 3,000 cash or 
$ 1,000 and $ 200 for 12 months , 
12 wide. Call 485-3712 or 804- 
262-0604. 12/22 

Skyline 91- 14 x 80, 3 bedroom. 
2 bath, Ceiling fans throughout, 
refrigerator, stove, screened 
porch, fenced, shed, wash/ dry 
possible, 20,500. Call 545-9190. 

Clayton- 91 2 bedrooms, 2 full 
baths, hot tub in master bedroom. 
Central heat & A/C, inside just 
remod.eled. . M^ see $18,000. 
919-232-3816. 

Big beautiful doublewide. 

Only 1200 down. 

Only $285 per month. 

Only one to sell. 

Call 804-249-0764 

sp 36k apr 9.7 tim 300 

Oakwood Homes. 12/8 

Mobile Home Finance Co. 

Has money to lend 

No points. No closing cost. 

$799 down will guarantee you a 

home . 1st. Time Buyer Program. 

Call 804-249-0764. 

Oakwood Homes 12/8 

1995 3 BR Repo 

Assume pmts. of only $215. 

And move in today. 

Call 804-249-0764. 

sp 18.5k tim 180 dp 1000 apr 

1 1 .0. Oakwood Homes. 1 2/8 



MOBILE HOME SITES 



COLONIAL RUN MOBILE HOME 
PARK - Vacant sp»:es- Rents av- 
eraging $237 • $252 monthly. 
Sites available now. 804-464- 
•0770. 12/15 



MOTORCYCLES 



WE BUY USED HARLEYS!! 

SOUTHSIDE HARLEY DAVIDSON 
499-8964. 

1/19 

HARLEYS WANTEDIII 
Cash for your HARLEYS today! 
Top dollar paid for good clean 
HARLEYS. take the hassle out of 
selling your HARLEY. I will come 
to you. Cash pakl for info on 
HARLEYS for sale. Call CHAD at 
Hami^on Roads Harley- DavMson, 
804-857-6549. and Peninsula 
804-245-5221. Mon-Fri. 9-7, Sat 
9-5. Va. DIr. 12/22 



|. 



INSTRUCTION 



^^^ LEAUM TO DRIVE 
TRACTOR-TRAILiR 

•No Experierxie needed 
•DOT CerttflcaiHjn. 
•F(4 w pert-tnw p^ 
MMh) 
•Placwnent DafA 

AULIANCE 

TRARMU (ENTERS 
LAOYSMtTH, VA 

CaNToNFne 



1-800-334-1203 



CASH 

TOP DOLLAR PAID 

For motorcycles, water craft, ATVs 

4 4 wheelers. Will pick up at your 

location. Call anytime. Lews 

message if no answer. 

SRS Motor Sports 

910-272-9827 

1993 Honda Gold Wing/As- 
pencade. Black. 8629 original 
miles. $11,000 negotiable. Call 
429-9132 before 9 pm. tfn^ 



MUSICAL 



KILL ROACHES! 
ENFORCER. OverNite Roach 
Spray or OverNite Pest Control 
Concentrate. Makes up to 2 
galkins for fast and lasting roach 
control. GUARANTEED! Available 
at DAIL'S HOME CENTER AND 
ROBBIES HOME CENTER. 

12/29 



PIANO FOR SALE 

A responsible person to take on a 
low monthly payment of a 
beautiful console piano, no money 
down. Call toll free: 1-800-609- 
1177. 

ONKYO STEREO RECEIVER 

Kenwood CD player. Pioneer 
Cassette deck, with bose speakers 
$800 or best offer. 919-473-3595, 
Manteo. 



PERSONALS 



Adopt: Devoted caring couple 
wishes to give an infant a loving 
home. We guarantee a bright and 
happy future. Legal / Medical 
paid. Please call Denise & Rocco 
1-800-428-1901. 12/29 

ADOPTION 

Happily married couple, unable to 
have children, wishes to adopt 
newborn. A happy home with lots 
of love and security promised. Will 
pay Legal/ Medical expenses. 
Call Les and Marianne collect 703- 
356-4576. 12/29 

My name is David.. I am 2 1/2. 
living in Christian family. Mommy is 
R.N. staying home with me. We 
want a brother or sister. Can pay 
expenses. Call Paul And Mary. 
703-257-5070. 12/8 

ADOPT: A young loving couple, 
wish to provide your whit© 
newborn with endless love and 
security. Full time mom and 
devoted professional dad. Legal 
and Medical expenses paid.. 
Please call Denise & Paul l-SOO- 
491-1756. 

Childless couple unable to 
ronceive. wishes to adopt infant. 
Loving secure home, with full time 
mom awaits, contact Darrell or 
Theresia anytime, 804-467-5751. 



ADOPTION 

Loving childless couple wishes to 
adopt infant. Happy, secure home 
with full time mother. Medical & 
Legal expenses paid. Please call 
Dian & Joe, 1-800-579-1860 or 
collect 703-830-1341. 12/8 

ADOPTION 

We know you are faced with a 
difficult choice. Let us help you 
find a loving, caring home for your 
baby. WE ARE EASY TO TALK 
TO. Please call FRIENDS IN 
ADOPTION 1-800-982-3678. 1/5 

SINGLE GIRLS & GUYS 

looking for love & romance? Call 
your personal dateline to meet 
your match! 1-900-255-2525. Ext 
8157. $2.99/ min 18 + Tch-Tn Fon 
Req. SERV U 619-645-8434. 
12/29 

SPORTS! TRIVIA AND SCORES. 
COLLEGE AND PROFESSIONAL. 
FOOTBALL, BASEBALL. BASK- 
ETBALL, HOCKEY. UPDATED 
DAILY. 1-900-226-4967. (2.95 
PER MINUTE) MUST BE 18 
YEARS. TOUCH TONE 
REQUIRED. 12/8 



BEACH PARTY ENTERTAINMENT 

Hottest dateline 1-900-287-6445 
$2.99/ min. Must be 18+ 



^5»ai@»» 



Get A Life! 



I Not Just An Apaitmentl| 



LUXURY APAimiENTB 
&TOWNHOMES 

OLYIPIC im raOL • WTTMB GflSN 

!}{otty Point 

CALL 424-7867 

On PmMnct Mf t Mn IMM M 
HMify Hwy J ^n Mon • ^& I • I 

1 9^ Awwrf or BrnJave 



PERSONALS 



Match Maktr Network 
Share This Holiday Season Call 
1-900-388-7879 ext 12. One 

simple phone call, and see for 
yourself just how easy it can be. 
Honest! CALL TODAY $2.49/ 
min. 18 yrs + HTP Va. Bch. Va. 
804-430-DATE (3283) 2/9 

Looking for someone aboard the 
USS Liberty in the 60's. Please 
write to P.O. BOX 1327 
Chesapeake, Va 23320 Attn: USS 
Liberty. My father is looking for 
shipmates. tfn 



PETS 



Border collie puppies- very k>yal 
intelligent pets/ exceptional 
herding dogs $75.00 each. Older 
Male / Female. Free to good 
home 804-562-2833. 12/8 

Pit bull pups- ADBA/UKC 
registered. 1st shots and wormed. 
Parents on premises. Stud service 
available. Call 340-8373. 12/1 

HAPPY JACK SKIN BALM: 
Checks scratching, relieves hot 
spots and irritated skin without 
sterokJs. Promotes healing & hair 
growth on dogs & catsi Available 
0-T-C INDUSTRIAL HDWE 543- 
2237. 

Looking for a flea-tick shampoo 
that kills fleas, monthly flea 
programs can't . Ask INDUSTRIAL 
HARDWARE 544-2232 about 
HAPPY JACK PARACIDE 
shampoo. Contains no pyrethrinsi 



ROOMS FOR RENT 



GREAT BRIDGE CONDO 

Single female seeks same 2 
bedroom, washer/ dryer. $300 
month includes all. $150 deposit, 
no pets. 548-4231. 12/8 



ROOM FOR RENT- GREEN RUN 
AREA. Large furnished room, 
private bath, walk in closet, 
laundry & kitchen privileges. $75 
wk. deposit required, references 
Dave/Deb 468-1006. 12/1 

THOMAS NELSON HOTEL 

Phone, color TV, daily maid 
service. Daily $21 ■*■ tax, also 
weekly rates 622-4341, Granby 
St., Downtown Norfolk. 12/29 



TO SHARE 



Lake Placid- Professional would 
like to share home with same. 
Convenient to Oceana base, 
beach & Lynnhaven Mall. All 
privileges, outdoor $pa, $250 plus 
share utilities with small deposit. 
430-3625 



TOWN HOMES / RENT 



ELEGANT TOWN HOUSE 

Near Frederick & Deep Creek in 
Portsmouth, just off 1-264. 
Fireplace, 2 bedroom, 1 1^ baths, 
appliances included. Immaculate 
condition. $450.00 monthly. 
Lease and security deposit. 
Owner. Call 804-826-6602. 



THINKING OF BUYING A 
NEW CAR OR TRUCK? 

Cdl us before you purchase your 
new veMde. We wM locate, nego- 
tiate and obtain the lowest pos- 
sible prkx for the vehide of your 
chokx. We even advise you on 
trade-ins, q}tk>ns, v^orranties and 
rebates. We wod( for you not tf>e 
dealer. 

Don't Overpay 

Call Us Today! 

(1-800-370-2882) 

PROFESSIONAL 
AUTO 

CONSULTANTS 

Waverly, VA 



TRAVEL 



SKI SNOW SHOE 

West Virginia. 1 & 2 bedroom 
units, sleeps 4-8. Whistle punk, 
Snowcrest, Powderidge, Fireplace, 
cable, VCR, Jacuzzi, owner rates. 
Call Linda 803-277-7449, fax 803- 
299-1323. 11/24 

BAHAMA CRUISE 

( 5 days / 4 nights 

UNDERBOOKEDI MUST SELL! 

$279 / couple! LIMITED TICKETS! 

1 -800-935-9999 EXT. 6423 

Monday through Saturday 

9am- 10pm 



TRUCKS FOR SALE 



1 950 Ford Pickup 

Backwoods handyman 

Special! Has 2 motors 

$350 ( does not run) 

Call 479-9863 after 1 pm 

Monday-Friday 1 pm to 7 pm 

Saturday & Sunday. 

91 FORD EXPLORER XLT 
Loaded, am/fm cassette stereo, 
power windows & door locks, tilt 
wheel, cruise control, sun/moon 
roof. Good condition. $12,000. 
book value $15,300. Call 429- 
9316. 



WANTED TO BUY 



Old electronic parts, tubes. Big oM 
speakers, tube HiFi amps. Old 
electronic books, catologs. Call 
703-856-8277. 12/29 

Lpoking for parts fpr a 1967 Ford 
Fairlane 4 door Sedan. Please call 
399-7907 after 6:00 until 10:00 
pm tfn 

••GUITARS WANTED** 

Cash paid for used acoustic or 
electric guitars and amps. 595- 
4663. 12/8 



PLAN YOUR 

ESCAPi 

A Fire Can Happen to 
Anyone at Anytime... 




I •Install smoke 
detectors. Test 
[hzm monthly and 

replace batteries at least 

once a year. 

Know two ways out of 
every room. 

Identify an outside 
meetins place, and never 
return to a burning 
buildins for any reason. 



Htni 

SAFI 

KDS 




MISSING CAT 
Old Great Neck Rd. Area 

$500 

IREWARD 

Black, 

white paws, 

white on 

face and 

stomach. 

Male, 

nmtered, 

decbwed, 

shorthaired. 

No collar. 

LOST 8/6 

Call Roy 

or 

Deborah 

7484 or 

1651-6513 or 

650-1124 or 

855-3071 




NO RIP-OFF. 

with ONDURA Ym Don't Hai« To Tear Off The (Md Rorrf To Put 
UpANewOae. ■Go« direct over OMstrng roof. 

■ He^i taveenvbonment— No dumping 
of okf non-biod^a(W>to roofing. ' 

■ Saves money — No landii ditpoaal 
'M charges. Cute lime and labor ooeli ki haX. 




i4| ■ Looks 8<Mt on any home. 
^ " ■ tJeinw limllBd wamnt 



•wwrre 



'QKEN 



OAl^ij^ 



'lED SLACK 
TAN KUE 

■M STOCK ooioie 

AllMMSMiiMilnMDc 



Sale 
99* 



MO 



MTlTT 

shMi(iua«,PM 



Southern StMM ChMapoak* 
80M20-2841 




BUNKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Classifieds are 

published In 78 state newspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $225. 

(For more than 25 words there is an additional 
charge of $8.00 per word.) 

Call547"4o71 for Ctassifled Representative 



SEIZED CARS FROM $17S. 027-2527 EH. 3052. Om««w) Paf Drtving School 

Portchat. Cadillaci, Chavyi, Qiad(W«k>onw Co««naiil Tww- 

BMWi. ConMIM AltoJMp«.4lnoonH»nbleB««if«t.SC-SpK- portB(XM41-43B4. ShMlwtt c« 

WD't. Your KM. TollfrM 1-800- lacular. dock-^)pnx«d, wat«f4fanl a00-33>442t. 

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"^iV ^** $29,900. Swimming pool, Mnnli DfllVER • SIMPtY THE BEST 

court. mor»l Oninlwco«llil«Mlar- OVERALL PACKAGE ON THE 
QOVERNMENT FORECLOSED wiy.ovcrtooUnoAllanlleOowi.yM ROAD. LONQHAUL-tSOOWWEEK 
HOMES lor pwiniM on $1. Dolin- minulM (rem hiatoric dowmown. AVBMOE,2800MILESWEEK.EX- 
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800488-9778 EM H-5139 lor cur- PHE^URE CLEANERS -NEWI P8I HOME TIME. BUmJNGTON MO- 
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HOME TYPISTS NEEDED Alto Catalog. Full Warranty Prompt 

PCAMofdpraoaawvuaare. S40.00Q/ Dal. Lowaat Pricat Sinoa 1972. DEBT CONSOUDATK)N: Cut Pay- 
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fan tolo a taamt pay lor ai^rl- 
$3S.00O/YEAR INCOME potantlal. anca 5 top starting pay. BonuaasS STEELBUILOtNQS-CuMomarcan- 
Raadmg Booka. Ton free 1-800- benrtlta. 3 raiiaa in lit yr, pro« callalionloroeaiMaf2itaelbuild- 
898-9778 Ext. R-S139 tor details, sharing, paid ortantaion, direct da- Ings. Never areolad. Depoaltstor- 
F**. posit a assifpied equip, you t«ie letied. WW SAVE THOUSANDSI 

homel 22 w/lyr. OTRCDL 'A' 1- CaKJoa ton-tree 1-800-341-7007. 
3»1' WATERFRONT 4.81 ACRES 800-633^)550 Ext H-9, Teg »'s 1231 2088 

- $29,900. Mature hardwoods & 

open pasture on pristine mountain ASSISTED LIVING - 24Ar. Ucenaed Bagint MEMORESCh^Ml, iDmen- 
ilveroveitoaliingvalley&horsatami, Supenisiontorlhaeldeily.tramlSOO tic Winter Marrtagas Personellzed 
yet prlvela a secluded. Just 2B monthly, all Inclusive. Eleven VA WEDDINGSwysize Photos.flow- 
irmeswestolWincheslsr.VA. Utili- Locations. Since 1968. AMERI- era. vMao, oidained minister Ga- 
Uas.percsvney. Buy tor less than CAN RETIREMENT HOMES. 1-800- Mbo. HONEYMOON SUITES RE- 
bank appreisrti Plus, special II. 999-6637. CEPTWN area, PARKING on prop- 

nance terms - limited time. Call arty. 1-8001242-7115. Qatllnbura. 

now. 304-492-5429. VEHCLE AUCTION - COMMON- 

V WEALTHOFVIHGINIA THURSDAY ABSOLUTE STEAL 2+ AC from 

RIVERLOT5W-AC-|15,9«. $795 • DECEMBER 7, 1985 • 10:00 AM $8S.2aAiio.- Ptl. MinutestoChee. 
Down - $ig7.47/Mo. Paik-like set- STATE POUCE HEADQUARTERS Bay. BeauWuBy wtoded m chami- 
tingw/5 min. walk to unspoiled fiver 7700 MIDLOTHIAN TURNPIKE, kig coaMal taMnB. ReadyMlMild 
-relaxorllsh. On n«» road Reedy RCHMONO, VIRGINIA. INSPEC-J' Keid. MiriaaowneaMpal 
to buHd, camp or retire. Call now TION: WEDNESDAY OECEMBEr lockmlpler. ■Juit$12.a90 

304-492-5429. Fin. 10ynetg.7S% 6, 1905 FROM 9:00 AM. UNTT JMe • I.Wk amorUiad 15 

ARM, $197.47/mo. OAC. 4:00 P.M. AND DAY OF AUCTKWX ,3yearbrtOOn«1d20*down, 

ONLY TERMS: 10% DEPOSIT CMC. LMMd time oflar. Thay 
AUTHENTIC LOG CABIN In the PER VEHICLE REQUIRED IF PAY- «nn1laat at these prioee. CaHnow 
Mountains on 180 acres with natu- MENT IS NOT MADE IN FULL THE 1-800-775-4563, ext. 6541 . 
ralsprlngs.oold-waterpond.moun- DAY OF THE AUCTION. NO EX- 

tainstreem. Deer, turkey elxxind. CEPTtQNSWIUBEMADE. IIII1B07 MACHINE SHOP EQUIPMENT, 
Great access, new survey. Own - HARUY DAVIDSON FXRP MO- 100'S OF ITEMS, INCLUDING 
lhlsmauntalnklngdomfar$179,900 TOflCYCLEIIH FORD ■ 4-1988 BRIDQPORT MILL $2,600 

- Under $1000/ecrel Local bank CROWN VKrrORIA:2-1987CROWN 30UTHBEND LATHE $2,400: RO- 
provldaaspptaisalandsuperfinanc- VICTORIA: 1-1988TAURUS; 1-1991 TAHY PHASE CONVERTERS 
mg. No dsvatopers pleasal Call a 1990 THUNDERBIRD: OTHERS- FROM $260: TOOUNG DEMPSEY 
owner 540-662-9216. 2-1992 DODGE DYNASTY; 1-1991 » CO., RCHMONO. SALE SAT- 
MERCURY SABLE; 1-1987 BMW: tWOAY 10:00(804)355-1619. 

ABANDONED HOMESITE. 38 1-1980 NISSAN PICKUP: 

ACRES - $49,900. Gorgeous mix CHEVROLET a GM - 2-1994-CA- PUBLIC AUCTION COMMON- 
01 woods a meadows Uvel. s»- PRICE: 4-1993 CAPRK;E;22-19d1 WEALTH OF VIRGINIA THUHS- 
duded with spring On stale road, CAPRICE; 10-1990 CAPRCE: 5- DAY 'DECEMBER 14, 1995*9:00 
utilities, periled. Excalleni linenc- 1989 CAPRICE; 4-1986 CAPRICE: A.M. VCU SURPLUS PROPERTY 
ing Only one. Call now 540-662- 1-1988CHEVROLETBERETTA: 1- WAREHOUSE 2600 E, GARY 
9216. 1981 a 1990LUMINA M968BUICK STREET, RCHMOND, VA. 1986 

REGAL: 1-1991 CHEVROLET FORD RANGER PICKUP •2-1979 
MAILBOXESETC.THEWOflLD'S CAMARO; 1-1991 5 1992 OLDS DODGE DISC PICKUP ' 1976 
LARGEST NETWORK OF FRAN- CUTLASS; 1-1982 8 1969 BUKJK, CHEVROLET C30 AMBULANCE * 
CHISEDPOSTAL,BUSINESSAND REGAL. l-igeSBUCKLASABRE: MICROSCOPES, ERNSTLEITZ, 
COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE 1-19e7CIERRA MISC roOTWEAR GMBH 'FILE CABINETS 'CHAIRS 
CENTERS IS EXPANDING DIS- • MISC AUTO PARTS ' CAMERAS ' DESKS ' COPIERS ' MEDICAL 8 
COVER HOW YOU CAN GROW ' COPIERS ' HONDA GENERA- SCIENTIFK: APPARATUS ' COF- 
IMTHUSI 1-80^456-0414 TOR 'MUCH MORE -FOR A COM- FEE URNS 'COMPUTERS 'PRINT- 

PLETE LISTING CONTACT STATE ERS ' FAX MACHINE ' LATHE, 
AaaemtHe Arte, CraRa and toys In SURPLUS(804)236-3666.(van48) ITEMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE, 
your spare Hme. Also serving typ- FOR A COMPLETE LISTING CON- 

mg and computer wort( Greatpay. PUBLIC AUCTION COMMON- TACT STATE SURPLUS PROP- 
No tee call 1 -800-632-6007 WEALTH OF VIRGINIA SATURDAY ERTY (804)23e-3866. 

■ DECEMBER 9. 1995 ' 9:00 AM 

GOT ACAMPGROUNDMEMBER- VIRGINIA TECH. CENTRAL ATTENTKJN HOMEOWNERS • Isl 
SHIP OR TIMESHARE7 WE'LL STORES WAREHOUSE 1 2nd Mw^igaiFMAnMel Rales 

TAKE IT AMERK;aS MOST sue- BLACKSBURG. VIRGINIA TERMS: ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED/ NO EQ- 
CESSFUL RESORT RESALE CASH. CERTIFIED OR CASHIERS UITY LOANS AVAILABLE No 
CLEARINGHOUSE CALL RE- CHECK. 1991 TEMPO ' 2-iaa8 upAwtFeaa. Call 1-800-420-761 7. 
SORTSALESINFORMATKINTOU CAVALIER ' 1984 BLAZER - 1978 UNtTED SOUTHERN MORTGAGE 
FREE HOTLINE 1-800^23-5867 a 1963 DODGE PCKUP * 19B2 

PLYMOUTH VAN ' 1880 DOOQE NORPLANT CONTRACEPTIVE 
SUNQUEST WOLFF TANNING VAN ' 1977 CHEVROLET VAN ' IIM-tANT USERS ■ You may be 
BEDS Commerdal-Homa Units 1963 RANGER PICKUP ' 1977 anMMtoconvaraalian. Call Piod- 
From $199 Buy Factory Direct and CHEVROLET CUSTOM DELUXE' ucte UaMIHy Attorney Chariee 
SAVE CaH TODAY tor NEW FREE COPIERS ' TYPEWRITERS, IBM Jotwaon for free ooneuHallon. To« 
Color Calriog 1-80O462-9197. CORRECTING 'DRAWINQ TABLES free 1-800-536-5727. 

■ MKROSCOPE ' COMPUTERS ' 

BOWHUNTING EQUIPMENT ENLARGER ' INOUSTRIAL SEW- FREE ALBUTEROL AND 
Bowtwnlars dleoounl warehouse, ING MACHINES, STRAIGHT NEBULIZERS IF YOU QUALIFY. 
Ameitoa'a largest archery suppHar, STITCH, OVERLOCK. FUT FUU WE ACCEPT AND BILL DIRECTLY 
alooksoverS,OOObowhunlingM>ns SEAInKR ' STORAGE CABtNET MEOCAREANSURANCE. FREE 
at 20^<Ml c« retail. Call 1-800- PROJECTORS * MUCH MORE. OEUVERV. CAU OUR PHAR- 
735-2687 for Iraa 184 p^ja oala- ITEMS SUBJECT TO CHANOEI MACY AT800-29M812. 
kig. FOR A COMPLETE LISTINQ CON- 

TACT STATE SURPLUS (804)236- BodybulhtereMLM Products more 
DRIVB^S: $36,000« yearly, up to 3688. pesMriul Van STEROIDS only t«u- 

t.3e/inl.,behamaaweiy»-12daya, ral. BULK UP or GET RIPPED 1- 

tn» mUkai, daiM, letlfaniant BECOME A MEDKALTRANSCflIP- 800-684-8253ext 3027 or 703-771- 
$1000 taip, $600 sefety bonus. TIONIST OPPORTUNITY TO 0287. 
Aaalgnadlraetora. Homady True* WORK AT HOME OR IN OFFKX 

Lkie 1-800-343-7988. TYPMQ FOR DOCTORS. HOME HEEOSa: Inauranoe Aganla (Vlr- 

STUDY. FREE LITERATURE. gMa). SeH suppleffletM ewoar 
BE YOUR OWN BOSS PosalUe P.C.D.L, ATLANTA GEORGIA 600- slefcnaea/aecldsnt, inianalva can 
$2500 part-Ume $8006 full-Ume 362-7070. DEPT. YYP736 K id B WWy.weelity draw, lUllima. 

monthly, processing insurance oo mn Heel en s, renewals. Training 

claims for haaithcare provldara. DRIVERS/OTR... $1,000 Hgn-on aeupport. 800-54 1-28» Ext. 661, 
Inveslmemrequlrad. Soltwarepur- bonus. newoorwarttonalequlpment, namaAwnibar. 
chase plus computer. Financing greet benefila.leaae pi<ogram. Eant 

available. 1-800-722-SAMS up to 29 cants par nMe. Students WOLFF TANNING BEOS - Buy « 

wekiomel Cal- Aik m i etn a ll e nal. 600- wholaaatoprioas and save $$$ fiM 
ATTN: EXPERIENCED TRUCK 960-TEAM. 800489-1030. body (Mrtng beds Irom $48 00 

DRIVERS DRIVE TO OWNII W month. Home end cofflmeicM Cat 

Down/78« ALL MILES. OwnarsNp DRIVERS -OTR- ADS $1,000 Sign- today 1-800-882-5016. 
poesMleiniemonttis. At^lO.OOOt- cnBonual UmNadopeninoslorn- 

mHeeMwndi. Company Drivare: peHanoadflaBiadditven. Aselinad COOKWARE Dtsoover youth, vi- 
NEWER EQUIPMENT. Compett- oonventlonals, banaWa, 40lk and taWy.longavitylhnMohWONOERS 
tivaPty/Benalla. C«: NEWAPPLE more. Cm todeyl 80O446-3438. OF WATERLESS COOIWK) Irae 
UNES 1-80O843-8308 or 1-800- Ext 1015 Owner Opeiatori Wei- repoitl Aakaboul75%dkoaunton 
843-3384 Madtoon, SO. Mon.-Frl. cornel cookware sM and haaHh rafXMl 

8-5PMCanlf«. CALLIII AFTER EVERYTHING FAILS. 1- 

STEEL BUILDING SALEIt SAVE 800434-4628. 
WE BUY MORTGAGES. Trust SO%M STRAIQHTWALL OR 

Deeds. AnnuMiee. LoOenas. DM QUONSET ...Need a shop? •~*~~~~"'"An)f CredK Rating 
You Saw Your Property? Receiving 3IM0.. $4798X0: N^ Sloraoe? ' Caah For IIOHiaeamar s ' No Eq- 
Peyments? Wliy WaM GET CASH 4ft<a...W7»7 00; Others avalaMa. u«y Programe * LeeMM Rates ' No 
HOm NalkmMe. Great Pikiaa aSHOUSCALLSONLYII PlorCER Up Front Fees ' Ueal Co. ' Unllad 
CaN 1-800658^74 ExL 36 1-800474-5258. Soulhem Mortgipa * C« Nalaan * 

1-800-2S44e08. 
ftAROLD IVES TRUCKINQ hMng DHVERS. PnMiad !« SoMdar, 

drtvars Free Drtvar TnMng... If JBHunl.PAM,BuNngan,UBATnjok A^OLUTE AUCTON - Dec. 6. 
you quaMy audanls w atB oma . eflOLMbuliMWte imn neafW I eh- WW li 8 > #tM api>iefcWVA58J00 
Ei9eifenoepayupto28(parmlle. mond end seve money? CalSH^ al.bdoklndualMMg.on$»aenM. 
Cx eeHe n t b e n s l l l s: 1-800442-0883. pere'Chotoe 1-800/846-2374 AUCTION -At as. oomnaRMalM 

ai ■■ipagiaiinat^ionmBanOppeig 
AAA OpportunNy OTR Dnvefs 'A PSCWIASIS? ELIMINATE PBO OanMr. BeydTam8la,MMl8 Aa- 
Career Compeny 'A 1 Eqmpmadl SKM, fTCHINQ. FLAKESI NEW soaMIM, hv., Biakere i AueNon- 
■A Ptee to can Home Musi be et APPROVED SPRAY RESTORES eere tlOOO. 1-800-i51-3S88. 
taaal2Svllh80odMVR Ca«IM<e YOUflSKINTONOflMALORtOO% Mtomet: h^:Mn«.lnR.net^MMx/ 
sues ChaNsnger Motor Fratghll- M0NEYBACK.NOSDEB7enS. 

800-756-30548am-5p,m. CAUNOWI 1-80O8I-8PHAY 3 DAYS ONLYI 7TM4TH. ARTIFI- 

CIAL WREATHS, QARLANO S 
let end 2nd MORTGAGES FAST OLCQUrTARSWANTEM ffiOER, CWISTMAS TREES •0-70% BE- 
Any Credit ratng. No upfront lees GIBSON. MARTIN. QRETSCH. LOWWNOlESALEt PTUFURNt- 
Eaeyp e ymenl pf ne. QreMnMaa. NATnNAL,BIQaeV,D'ANQ6JCO, TURE, FIXTUKS AND EOUIP- 
CslChailaBTan«rat804^24M8 STROMBERa. EFWHCME. MSIT OUTIIT 461 EAST BELT 

or140O«7-880e. OWMSTATE lyOSUTE AtBO OmOi* MAN- BLVD MCHMOND. VA(804)at- 
MORTQAQE. OOLMS. 1800-1B8irS. THESE 3728. 

MUNC» ONLY n£Xm. TOP 
ttaignr Far KioeeeaT Davetap CA»4 PAKM 1-80O401-0440. POOL TMLIS - Naa 1986 Med- 
aiaady Maaaw paaaWa 86.000 ale. Al 

iMi««y,««Nn1tiiwn8a.dM(lb- ORIVER8-SoMaTaania.tn00Je nelwy 
utngsM,a^pnlapieduela. Mual Sigh On. Top TaauM Earn 
be wMng to toveal «160 1-80O- $10S,0OO», Ma(ar la w a BliWe i a l • «m«mimMHii«X>8384471 




10 Virtpnia Beach Sun. Friday. Decembw 8. 1995 



A ripple in 

calm waters? 



DContkiiMd Rom P«g« 1 

as a council member." 

"I get to wonder how much staff 
time is called on," said Baum. 
"ITjere ought to be some feeling of 
how much we shoaid do." 

The mayor and Strayhom both 
hold a lot of meetings, said Dean, 
and pointed out that he handles 98 
percent of his correspondence as a 
council member himself without 
help from staff. 

This is a fine time to be mayor, 
remarked Sessoms. 

Just on Monday last week, 250 
people showed up for a fund raiser 
in honor of Mayor Meyera 
Oberndorf attended by all city 
council members. Included in this 
group were ail of the other council 
members. Oberndorf was credited 
with bringing the council together 
on major issues. 

Heischober who is an at-large 
member of council, said that ever 
borough council member has the 
right to held meetinp. Usually, he 
said, the meetings focus on specific 
issues. The comprehensive plan 
relates to the entire city. 

He said the problem arises when 



Princess Anne Borough citizens 
expressing their views at the 
meetings, feel that they have 
accomplished desired results with 
their input only to find that they are 
not always supported by the 
eventual council decisions. "This 
puts a read burden on council 
membws." 

He said that when pec^le exi»ess 
their desires and they have to be 
told that, "That's up to then entire 
council," you haven't accomplished 
anything. 

Council was getting into deeper 
issue than the use of staff, said 
Harrison. 

Council woman Barbara Henley 
said, "Robert has every right to 
have a public meeting." She 
suggested rephrasing the purpose of 
the meeting and emphasizing that it 
was not a public hearing. 

"No one at all is trying to keep 
you from having a meeting," said 
Sessoms. 

To Sessoms, Baum said, "I'm 
glad you decided you didn't want to 
be mayor." 

Harrison suggested that another 
letter be sent out to Dean's 
constituents .saying all the council 
members may not be in attendance. 



Visions of a Sugar Plum Christmas 



Condemnation issue 
doesn't sit weil here 



D Continued From P»gi$ 1 

In the 1992-93 operating 
budget a program was included 
setting up a fund to purchase 
Burton Station property and re- 
locate the residents. The current 
budget shows an estimated cost 
of $19 million for the program 
with a current allocation of $5.4 
million through the year 2000. 

Oberndorf pointed out Tues- 
day that Burton Station has al- 
ways been impacted by the air- 
port, part of it is in the crash 
zone, and loans for improving 
the residences were not avail- 
able. Also, federal funds, such as 
the Community Development 
Block Grant funds which were 
used to improved other blighted 
areas, could not be used on Bur- 
ton Station because the Federal 
Aviation Authority did not want 
to increase density in an airpcwt- 
impacted community. 

Oberndorf said that the peo- 
ple had been in limbo until 
council came up with the plan 
and the funding to purchase the 
properly and relocated the resi- 
dents. "That's where the millions 
of dollars have been spent so 
far." 

James Lawson, in the real 
estate division under Public 
Works, who said that he would 
have a complete report next 
week, said that the city so far 
has spent $2,081,369 on the pro- 
gram of which $1,274,022 was 
used to acquire property. To 
date, the city has attempted to 
acquire 85 parcels of which 27 
have been acquired through ne- 
gotiation, and of that number 16 
were homes occupied by the 
.owners or tenants. He said 58 
parcels remain. 

In addition t the cost of ac- 
quisition, the city also spent 
$734,100 to relocate residents, 
and another $73,240 for ap- 
praisals. 

Councilman John A. Baum, 
who recalled the meeting with 
the property owners at the 
Ebenezer Baptist Church in Bur- 
ton Station (most of the then- 
Council members were present), 
said that the program started 
with good intentions. However, 
he said, taxpayers' money is be- 
ing used for which there is no 
justification with no firm objec- 
tive in mind — if the park does 
not b^oHK a reality. 

Councilwoman Barbara Hten- 
ley. who has been cautious 
about expanding the council's 
condemnation powers, said that 
she would prefer the more nar- 
row version which requires the 
supcrmajority of council for ap- 
proval. 

She said, howev», that re- 
gardless of the vereion preferred 
by council, the General Assem- 
bly could come back with aa- 
otherpopc^. 

Lilley said that that is a 
problem encountered when 
Council is divided. 

CiwiKilwcmiaa Louisa Sttay- 
horn who had supported only 
limited condemnation powere to 
clear titles, suggest that a ma- 
jority of the property owners 
would have to agree before 
council could exercise its aa- 



thority. 

Oberndorf emphasized that 
the city never intended to be ne- 
glectful of Burton Station, but 
that when a large portion of the 
conununity became a clear zone 
for 4he airport he FAA said it 
didn't want rezoning for high 
density. 

Strayhom said that the ordi- 
nance is going into areas other 
than she had understood it 
would. She wanted to know what 
the council could do to protect 
the community from the possible 
^tions of future councils. 

Lilley said that protections 
are provided by limiting the 
power, to economic development 
projects in define areas; requir- 
ing a public planning process; 
incorporation of an economic 
development project into the 
city' Comprehensive Land Use 
Plan; providing relocation assis- 
tant for any person or business 
affected by condemnation pro- 
ceedings; prohibiting condemna- 
tion fcH- the sole benefit of a pri- 
vate person or entity, and pro- 
hibiting the exercise of "quick- 
take" authority. 

To date, the city 
has attemped to 

acquire 85 
parcels of which 

27 have been 

acquired through 

negotiation, and 

of that number 

16 homes 
occupied by the 

owners or 
tenants. He said 

58 parcels 
remain. 



The proposal most likely 
with best chances for council 
approval allows condemnation 
for projects of at least 25 acres 
in a blighted area. 

Lilley said that the property 
owners would be getting more 
protection than they would if a 
road had to be put through their 
property. He said that he was not 
aware of any process wboe you 
can get a coimnunity to vote on 
condemnation. That would be 
like an oxynMHon, he said. 

Locating the owners of sontt 
of the panels in Burton Station 
has been a problem fw tte city. 
Lawson said that in sotae cases 
there arc 100 owi^s sfRead all 
over the country. 

"This is a very l»(»Ki pow«." 
said Strayhom, "and we're ask- 
ing for it. We're talking about 
chnges that will affect prople 
fw kmg time." Ste sakl dut sIm 
was KM, sure the conaniuity is 
pro^ctoJ altlwugh, "it is not my 
desire to kill what we're doing tt 
Burton Station." 

Lilley is expected to return 
to council next Tuesday with a 
revised versitm at te oniinaace. 



OContkiiiod from Pag* 1 

up on Santa's lap to tell him 
what they wanted for Christmas. 

ScHne adults may have noticed 
that Santa slightly resembled 
councilman Robert Dean, who 
hosted the tree-lighting ceremony 
for the gingerbread village the 
night brfore. 

But Jeffrey Davenport, 4, of 
Chesapeake, didn't seem to no- 
tice. All he was concerned with 
was his candy cane, and his con- 
versation with the jolly man in 
the red suit 

"He's gonna bring me some- 
thing," said Davenport shyly. 
"He's going to bring me racing 
cars so I can race my Dad and he 
can race me." 

As the children lined up to 
see Santa Claus, Marshall, armed 
with a walkie-talkie, checked in 
with McRee, who was overseeing 
the activities and volunteers 
across the road at the Pavilion. 

She put the radio down, smil- 
ing. 

"Bobby the Clown has just ar- 
rived," she told a nearby volun- 
teer who was eating a late lunch. 
Marshall explained that the 
event is something that the bak- 
ery enjoys and counts on each 
ysff. 

"This is a benefit to help us 
continue and increase our benefits 
to people with disabilities," said 
M£ushall. 

"We're trying to provide oppor- 
tunities for them to be employed 
and have on-the-job training. We 
also place them out in the com- 
munity and have otho- jobs," she 
added 

"We concentrate on people's 
abilities, not disabilities. We try 
to install a sense of responsibil- 



i^ in whatever they do." 

Mmlttll ncmi that the event 
wmild not be a succ^s without 
the mttiy vdunte^ who came 
forwwd to help. 

One group of volunteers, 30 
students from the Common- 
wealth Challenge program at 
Camp Pendleton, helped oat at 
Kids Day. This is the sectxxl year 
that Commonwealth Challenge 
has sent the volunteers. 

Felix Duarte, 17, a Fairfax res- 
ident who will complete the ^o- 
gram next month, was one of the 
vdunieers. 

"The program is for people 
who drop out of school." said 
Duarte. "It's for five montfis. It's 
a militffly training and (education) 
program. We get a military train- 
ing and then we go home and go 
to college whoe we join the na- 
tional guards. When we finish the 
training, we can do anything we 
want to do." 

Duarte, like the others in the 
program, has not been away from 
Camp Pendleton much during the 
past four months. 

When asked if he wanted to 
volunteer at the gingerbread festi- 
val, he willingly obliged. 

"We've volunteered to come 
here." Duarte said in a husky 
voice. "Nobody told us to come 
here, we wanted to. 

"It's a chance for us to get out 
of the barracks and meet people," 
he grinned. "We don't have a lot 
of chance to socialize, and this is 
one of the times we have to talk 
to people." 

Duarte spend the day like the 
other volunteers — helping the 
children play games, painting 
faces, helping decorate cookies 
and houses and assisting shoppers 
and children with their hands full 




PhalDbyM.J Khoblook 

HO HO HO. Dnrinf a lancheon with Santa Clavs, local children 
had a chance to tit on the Jolly old elfs lap and vIsIL 



by carrying items out to their au- 
tomobiles. 

"We really like to work with 
kids," said Duarte. "Before, we 
probably didn't. Now that we 
have the discipline, we do. 

"It's great. It's kind of like be- 
ing a kid again," he added. "We 
were playing games with them. It 
was great There's nothing better 



than playing with kids." 

The gingerbread village will 
be on display at the Pavilion 
until Dec. 17. Children may pick 
up their houses at the recreation 
centers the following day. The 
additional pieces of the village, 
designed by the bakery, will 
remain in the Pavilion until Jan. 
7. 



Ag programfinally kicks off at Beach 



DContlnuad From Pago i 
IRS, but that he was confident 
there would be no problem. 

The program, he said, "is a 
gr^t buy." 

Even with the cost to the city, 
Macali said, it will be beneficial 



to the city because infrastructure 
will not be needed in ARP areas. 
Applications are being made 
available for farmers through the 
Farm Bureau, the Ruritan Club 
and various locations. Applica- 
tions are expected to start coming 



back on Jan. 2 and the first clos- 
ings will take place between Jan. 
2 and 6. 

It's important, said Macali that 
assessments — two will be made 
for each property — be kept con- 
fidential. 



As more of die ARP fund will 
be used to pay interest in subse- 
quent years, the total amount of 
purchase will decrease — to $9.6 
million in 1967, $8.4 million in 
1987 and $24 million in the re- 
maining years. 



; 



Hampton Roads on the Move 



Chesapeake motei 
hosts friends, family 
of l\/lary view patients 



Visiting a friend or a loved one 
for Christmas and need a place to 
stay? The Chesapeake Super 8 
Motel at 3216 Churchland Blvd. 
may be able to assist you. 

Through Super 8's sixUi annual 
Rooms at the Inn Holiday program, 
participating Super 8 properties, 
like the one in Chesapeake, will 
offer free accommodations on 
Christmas Eve to out-of-town 
fiimis or relatives of patients in the 
Maryvicw medical Center and 
Maryview Nursing care Center. 

"Super 8's Rooms at the Inn 
program is designed to bring 
families and friends together during 
the holidays," Super 8 President 
Robert N. Weller said. "By 
renK)ving the cost of a motel room. 
Super 8's across the country will 
iK^uUy make holiday gatherings 
a little bit easier for Uiose in need." 

Rooms at the Inn was inspired by 
a similar program started in 1987 



by Super 8 franchisees Linda 
Aamold Tharaldson and Gary 
Utaraldson of Fargo, N.D. Linda 
said, because they experienced 
several family tragedies around the 
holidays, "Christmas and 
Thwksgiving were associated wiUi 
a lot of bad memories for us. We 
decided a program like this would 
help us change that — would turn a 
negative to a positive." 

Super 8 Motels Inc. adopted the 
program in 1990. Last year 
approximately 650 Super 8's 
throughout eh United States and 
Canada donated 1,503 rooms. This 
year the chain expects to give away 
even more rooms. 

Reservations should be made 
through Maryview Medical Center 
or Maryview Nursing Care Center, 
who will notify the property. 
Because the number of available 
rooms may be limited, reservations 
should be made as early as possible. 



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The Virginia Beacli Sun 



VIRGINIA BEAC 



67th Year 



City goes back to 
the drawing board 
oh condemnation 



By LEE CAHILL 
City Coundl Rapoitor 

Virgiilia Beach City Council 
may request ctmdemn^tion power 
for economic development 
which would apply only to Burton 
Station. 

City Attonwy Leslie Lilley at a 
work session Tuesday was 
instructed to prepare a fifth 
version of the condemnation 
(H'dinance limiting the power to 
Burton Station, a community 
adjacent to the Regional 
Airport in Norfolk, where the city 
wants to develop an industrial 
pffik. 

The new proposal will be on 
the Jan. 2 agenda when council 
is expected to select the version 
of the legislation it wants the 
1996 General Assembly to pass. 

A feature of the fourth version 
of the legislation would have 
required the city to obtain the 
consent of 51 percent of the 
residential owners in a 
community targeted for 
condemnation. 

The stipulation was inserted in 
the proposed legislation to offer 
more protection to the residents. 
However, some council members 
felt that the requirement would be 
unfair to ttie propoty ownos who 
had already settled with the city. 
They also felt that the stipulation 
woiUd put the city in a position 
where it would be paying for 
consent — through higher prices 
forptoperty. 

Council apparently has agreed 
to other features of the proposed 
legislation — the power would be 
limited to economic development 
projects in defined areas; that a 
pubUc planaiflg process 
(information of an economic 
development project into the 
city's Comprehensive Land Use 
Plan) would be required; that 
relocation assistant would be 
provided for any person or 
business affected by 
condemnation proceedings; and, 
that condemnation would be 
prohibited fca the soles benefit of 
a private person or entity. Also, 
quick take authority, used in 
condemnaUon for roads, would br 
prohibited. 

The city envisions an industrial 
park at the site. City Manager 
James K. Spore said Uiat the city 
has been negotiating with 
Norfolk, which also has been 



Citizen Brew Thru concerns 
come to a head at Beach 



By LEE CAHILL 
City Council Reporter 

A "Brew Thru" isn't the kind of 
establishment the city had in 
mind in attempting to create a 
family- and pedestrian-friendly 
community in the Beach Borough. 

As a result, Virginia Beach 
City Council Tuesday 
unanimously endorsed a 
resolution requesting the 
Alcoholic Beverage Control 
Board to deny an aj^lication for 
a license to sell alcoholic 
beverage to a company that 
wants to locate a Brew tWu, a 
trade name, on the southwest 
comer of I^iftc Avenue and 29th 
Street 

The facility would be a 2.000- 
square-foot convenience store 
with drive-thru windows. Motmists 
would drive be able to buy T- 
shirts. soft drinks, snacks, 
cigarettes, toothpaste, canned 
goods ami beo'. 

Ifenry Richardson, representing 
residents in opposition to the 
Brew Thru, said that the city's 
land use plan sees Pacific 
Avenue as a more friendly 
pedestrian-orient^ environment. 
He said that a need for such an 
estaUishment is not justified and 
making it easier for people vo 
purchase beer would Im; "in 
coiflict with our values." 

Hm establishment of the Brew 
Umi at the resent would «art the 
f^mA of similar establishments 
ihR^^cm the city and the state. 
headdsL 

Tlie city has invested $40 to 
$50 million in Atlantic Avenue 
Mid plans to move on to Pacific 



Avoiue, Richardson noted. 

Maryann Nixon, president of 
the Res(»t League and Coalition 
voiced hw objections to the Brew 
Thru by pointing out that the area 
has a mix of churches, residences 
and schwils. 

Judy Connors, a resident of 
Ocean Park off Shore Drive, said 
that tte Brew Thru concept is not 
conducive to upscale 
development and that she feared 
if one of the establishments gets 
a foothold at the resort, Shore 
Drive would be the next target. 

Ann Henry, who lives in the 
500 block of 27th Street, was 
concerned that the establishment 
would generate more litter and 
encourage underage drinking. 

F. Sullivan Callahan, 
representing Pinacle Convenience 
Inc.. said the establishment would 
be a copycat of the one in 
Corolla, N.C. 

r Miing on the property permits 
the ;'rew Thru. All the company 
needs is an ABC license, over 
which the city has no authority 
except to Kgiaa its objections. 

He insisted that "what we have 
here is a convenience store" 
where alcohol sales would make 
up 35 to 40 percait of the total. 

Mayw ^y^a CX>«Tidorf. who 
has im^s^ the re^lution, said 
that she had no problem with 
anything but the off-premises 
alcohol license. 

Police Chwf Chules Wall said 
ths: be w» oppomi to anything 
that mixes ak^tri and gas. He is 
(^^poaed to any place diat requires 
)%Ni tt me ^Hir car to get alcdiol, 
henid. 



acquiring property in the area, for 
a cooperative plan that would 
result in a better project. 

Mark Wawner , who is with the 
city's Economic Development 
Dqiartment , said that when the 
lark is fully developed 8,000 new 
yibs would be created. 

The city is trying to acquire 120 
parcels from 85 owners, including 
57 houses and 63 vacant 
properties. 

So far. said James C. Lawson in 
the real estate division of Public 
Works, the total cost of 
acquisition has been $2,081,369. 
of which the city has paid 
$1,347,262 to acquire the property 
and $734,107 in funds from the 
Department of Housing and Urban 
Development has been spent on 
relocation. 

Law»)n also said that 21 houses 
have been purchased to date at an 
average price of $55,569, while 
the average relocation assistance 
has been $45,882. 

He furthered that four 
homeowners have refused the 
city's offer and six vacant parcel 
owners have refused the city offer. 
Also, 15 property owners are 
willing to sell but are unable to 
because of title problems. Three 
of the houses on these properties 
are occupied, Lawson said. 

The total acquisition price of 
the Burton Station property has 
been appraised at $5,536,300. 

The difficulty in clearing titles 
was actually the driving force in 
seeking condemnation power for 
economic development. The 
council already has condemnation 
power for projects needed for the 
public health , safety and welfare 
irf tte GiUzNis. 

Lawson said that some of the 
property owners have hired their 
own lawyers to clear the titles to 
the property, but most cannot 
affixi the expense. 

No money is available through 
HUD to clear the titles. He said 
it would cost as much as $4,000 
or $5,000 fw each property. 

Lilley said that each case 
would take six months to a year 
and that the city does not have 
the money for attorneys, nor does 
that city normally provide legal 
assistance for property owners 
whose propmy is being taken. 
"We can't be on both sides of 

DSm condemnation. Pago 7 



Pungo g 



Down-home pleasures 
highlight the season 



By JANE ROWE 
Sun Correspondent 

There's mud instead of 
snow, but the wind is chilly 
and a fire in the wood stove 
under a wooden shelter looks 
inviting. In the adjacent field, 
rows of coUards grow next to 
pines, who-e customers browse 
in search of a fresh-off-the- 
farm tree for this Christmas. 

Jim Bright, who grows and 
sells Christmas trees at his 
Creeds home, is gearing up for 
a Princess Anne County- 
"country" Christmas. 

Meanwhile, other Southern 
Virginia Beach residents offer 
advice on how to cook local 
delicacies and put the finish- 
ing touches on Christmas dec- 
orating. 

Bright also sells winter pro- 
duce, but the white pines and 
Virginia Pines that his regular 
customers were selecting on a 
recent raw Saturday afternoon 
are his real stock in trade. He's 
one of a handful of local farm- 
ers who are offering a fresh al- 
ternative to cut trees shipped 
here from points north and 
west. 



Christmas tree farming 
is a relatively young industry in 
this area, and growers say that 
some species do well here. Tom 
Kay, who runs Tim's Christmas 
Tree Farm with his son. Tim. 
also sells white pines at his 
location just south of the Pungo 
stoplight. Leland cypress are 
available jyiUealey^JF^m on 
Charity Neck Road. 

Kay began raising trees in 
1980 at a farm on General 
Booth Boulevard before mov- 
ing to Pungo. Bright, who grew 
up locally and works for the 
Department of Forestry, be- 
came interested in growing 
Christmas trees at about the 
same time when the forestry 
department conducted a pro- 



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1REES 6AU>RE! tls the scMoii ifer Chrfstimt trees, m tree finncr Jin Iriglit, right, aN emil«yee 
J.R. Fcrrem wcl kamr. Nmdredi «f pe«plc wlH come to Pinf* thb eeaseii for a 1ri|ht" trtt. 



Jim Bright is 

gearing up for a 

Princess Anne 

County 

"country" 

Cliristrnas. 



gram to encourage local 
landowners to grow trees. 

"About 15 years ago, the 
Department of Forestry first 
tried to get people into grow- 
Mg Cferistms: trees as another 
way for the landowner to di- 
versify," he explained. "A few 
years later I decided to plant 
some, and I planted a couple 
hundred trees that ftfst year." 

A young seedling will grow 
to six-feet tall, or about the 
height most people prefer their 
Christmas trees, in seven 
years. Bright now has three 
acKS of pines at various levels 



of maturity, but last summer's 
dry weather killed some of his 
young plants. 

Bright's been selling the 
trees for six years, and he says 
he's atu-acted a regular clien- 
tele during that time. 

"I've been here six years and 
the same people have been 
coming back every six years," 
he said. 

He also offers some free ad- 
vice on how to cook collards 
for those who'd like to culti- 
vate a taste for this winter 
vegetable. 

"There's an art to cooking 
collards." he said. It takes at 
least a couple of hours to cook 
the . brad-leafed plants until 
they're tender, and Bright sug- 
gests removing the tough 
stems, then boiling the leaves' 
in ham hocks. 

"Cook the ham hocks until 
they're done, than take the 
stems out of the collards," he 
said. "Then, I like to separate 
the big leaves from the small." 
Drop the larger leaves into 



the pot with the ham hocks, 
taking care to make sure the 
water is boiling. When they've 
cooked until they're a little 
less tough, add the medium- 
sized, then the smaller leaves. 
Bright cations that you should 
make sure the water's boiling 
through the whole process and, 
if you like, you can also boil 
potatoes with them. 

"The collards are a little 
small this year, but they're 
real good." he added. 

Unlike most vegetables, 
they reach their prime after 
the frost strikes them, which 
makes them a winter-time sta- 
ple locally. Uniaaally severe 
weather can damage them, 
though. Bright said. 

"The wind will bum the aids 
of the leaves," he said. "If you 
get a real bad wind chill it just 
cooks them, and a real hard 
freeze will ruin than." 

A few miles up the 

□Sm get, Page 7 



Little kids (and big ones, too) love choo-choos 



Firefighters 
present annual 
train show 

By M.J. KNOBLOCK 
Sun Correspondent 

As the trains circled the tracks, 
a captive audience of adults and 
children watched. 

Fire Station #10/23 on Provi- 
dence Road has been transformed 
into a train station of sorts with 
about IS active trades with neariy 
100 cars, becoming a place wl^re 
children of all agra can enjoy the 
second annual "On Track With 
the Virginia Beach Fire Depart- 
ment" through this Saturday. 

"Particularly around Christtnas, 
it gives the guys part of their 
childhood back and you share it 
with the kids," explained Capt. 
Dennis Keane of Cmnpany 23. 

"During the week when the 
show goes on and the kids come 
in. you just see their faces light 
up. It gives you a fvetty good fed- 
ing — especwlly at night, when 
it's all daric except for tl» trains. 
It's great" 

Keane and event co-chair 
Keene Black, a master fire fighter 
at the same station, are both 
membo's of the the Tidewater Big 
Train Operattvs Club, which set 
up the 18-by45-foot display. 

The idea began as something 
for the firefighters' families, but 
was quickly Iransiorm^l into a 
event they wanted K> share with 
the iwblic. 

"We thought by inviting the 
community because we can get 
more informatiM cwt to the ccmi- 
munity," said Bla:k. "We have 
the Smoke Etetector Committee, 
sponsored by the Kiwanis Club, 




PhMbyUJ.NiMUoek 

•OTS WITH TOYS. C»«hiirs Capt Denaii Keaae, Mt, aa4 Maater 
Flf^^cr Kceae Hack helped >et ap 15 trada hastt^ mora thai 
100 rail can far the "Oa Track with the Vlrglala teach lira 
D^ftm^" The t^r trahis ara aa display at Hra Kaflaa 10/23 m 
FraeMe a c e Rni tfmai^ Satarday. 



and the Virginia Beach Safety 
Council. 

"In our department, we have the 
Fire Education Bureau that partic- 
ipates," he added. "The idea was 
to emphasize fire safety during 
the holiday — a little fire safety 
at the same time to share the 
firetouse with the community. 

'I thiidc the kids love the Dvins. 
and they can see the trains and 
die fire tr^ks at the same time 
— trig kids and littk kids." 

Keane said the event is a treat 
for the firefighters, train club 
members, and anycme who stops 
by. 

"The house is open to the 
community. To see the kids come 
in to see it and enpy it, that's our 



favorite part." he smiled. 

During the past w^k, the fire 
station has bran up and running 
with firefighters still available for 
calls. 

Members of the train club are 
on hand in shifts to run the cus- 
tom-made trains during open 
hours. They taakx sure the dis- 
plays, which uxk about 24 hcmrs 
to set up, are running properly. 
Some of the firefighters run the 
trains as well. 

Each night, a remote control 
fire itmk is raffM to children ap 
12 and under at no charge. The 
trucks were (kmated by the Vir- 
ginia Beach Professional Fire- 
fighters AssociMicm, Local 2924, 

This Saturday a starter train set 



donated by Aristocraft will alsc 
be raffled off. 

Dean DaSilva, president of the 
Professional Firefighters Associa- 
tion, was on hand for the event 
last weekend. He said it was a 
good opportunity for people to 
have fun and learn more about the 
fue department. 

"I think the public would expect 
a firefighter is someone special 
— not just someone you call, 
911, and they come to your 
house," Da Silva noted. 

"They're expectjwl to be role 
models. This is a gbod opportunity 
for people in the community to 
meerUie firefighters in their area 
that l^tect them and their city. 
Of course, we [Hcfer to meet peo- 
ple this way, rather than go to 
their house fcff an emer^ncy," he 
aided. 

Besides meeting the firefighters 
and seeing the trains, there is 
much more. ' 

The Virginia Betcb "Monster 
Fire Truck" was outside the sta- 
tion on Sunday to greet visit(»3. 

The 1994 Seagrave fire truck 
weighs 10 tiMis ami stai^ on five- 
foot tires. It was purchased by 
Master Firefighter Dot Moss and 
donated to die city for its fire ed- 
ucation program after students 
from the Beach's vo-tech ix'ogram 
worked (ni the vehicle. 

Wags, the fire dog, was also 
there Sunday as part of a fire 
^ety iwogram for children. 

One display at the firehouse in 
OT C^)»atiOT Smoke Detector. 

"That's a pognun that any resi- 
dent of Virginia Be^h, regardless 
of income, cm ask for a smoke 
(fete^Kv," DaSilva explain^!. 

"We install it in tl^ir home at 

DSae m^lGHTBt^ P^^ 7 



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■■■■^■■■H 



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f vi.^« ^^ch Sm. R^kh^v. DeoMnber 15. 19^5 



Commentary 



Santa's toy bag 

It's an age-old question: what should I get 
him (or her) for Christmas? If it's a child you 
are talking about, there are another entire set 
of problems to address as well — from 
whether the gift will hold the child's attenUon 
to, more importantly, whether it's safe. Many 
presents given In the best of Intentions have 
ended up causing needless injury. 

During the holiday season, stores are flooded 
with new and exciting toys. So how can jrou 
know which ones to buy? For parents, 
grandparents and friends, make the task 
easier by following some common sense 
shopping tip: 

Basic contidentions 

Early childhood educators agree that toys 
play significant roles In helping children, from 
Infancy through school age, develop important 
educational concepts and life skills. Good tojrs 
should entertain and occupy their attention. 
In fact, one of the main ^^ues of a good toy is 
to extend a child's attention span. 

Several shopping points should be 
considered: 

■ Is the toy safe (no rough edges, 
unbreakable, well-constructed, flame- 
retardant and free of parts that can be 
swaUowed)? 

■ Will the toy append to the child's likes and 
dislikes? This is an important consideration 
because not all children of the same age have 
similar interests. Is this toy based on the 
child's real interests or because a friend has 
It, or was it seen on television? 

■ Is the toy durable, able to stand up to 
children's sometimes rough play? 

■ Will the child be capable of enjoying the 
toy? Some toys are Just too complicated or too 
simple for a specific age group. 

■ Will the toy hold the child's Interest over a 
period of time? Most toys are designed Just to 
satisfy a child's initial interests. 

Age appropriate ■uggestlonf 

Still confused when pondering the 
possibilities? A trip down the toy aisle of any 
store can prove a daunting experience for 
even the most avid adult shoppers. If this is 
the case, consider a few of the long-cherished 
standbys: 

■ Infants — stuffed toys, rattles and mobiles. 

■ Toddlers (12 j^pj 36 months old) — dolls, 
blocks, lightweight balls, and push-and-puU 
toys. 

V Preschool children (3 to 5 years old) — 
"make believe" fantasy games, storybooks and 
art supplies. 

■ School-age children (6 to 12 years old) — 
bi(^les, board games, musical Instruments, 
scientific and mechanical tojrs, and sports- 
related equipment. 

Remember, above all, that safety counts. 
Happy shopping and good luck! — V.E.H. 

None for the road 

If you're like most people, you probably 
think that alcohol-related traffic accidents 
only happen to other people — not to you or 
your loved ones, and certainly not during the 
holidays. 

Thing agalA. 

The National Highway and Traffic Safety 
Administration estimates that a shocking two 
out of every five Americans wUl be involved in 
an alcohol-related crash at some point In their 
lives. In addition, it is estimated that 2.75 
million drunk driving accidents annually 
victimize 1.64 million people. And of the 401 
people who died on American roads in the 
1993 holiday season, 219 (or Just under 55 
percent) were Involved in alcohol-related 
crashes. 

These are nothing short of staggering 
revelations about a dangerous practice — 
drinking and dri^dng. 

According to AAA of Tidewater statistics, 
however, there is a greater public 
consciousness today when it comes to alcohol 
and driving. In fact, alcohol-related traffic 
fatalities declined from 57 percent of all 
crashes In 1982 to 45 percent in 1992. A few 
years ago. no one thought much about 
drinking at a party and then getting behind 
the wheel. But tilings are different now, 
thanks to such concerned ^oups as Mothers 
Against Drunk Driving (MADD), Students 
Against Drunk Driving (SADD) and AAA. who 
help spread the word that drinking and 
driving don't mix. 

Another thumbs up goes to cab companies 
that offer free rides to intoxicated would-be 
drivera, and bars and restaurant that let the 
designated driver have free non-alcoholic 
beverages. 

During the holidays, folks should be 
celebimltog together — not mourning because 
someone made the wrong choice to drink and 
drive. — V.E.H. 










.WfflllHWNOJNSOWpiSOF 




OL' Poiac^»ReEL,TiaKu,uaj^, 




Letter to the editor 



He's turning off the 'tube' and 

Editor 

The "Real Life" section of the Virginian-Pilot, 
Sunday, Dec. 3, dared its Hampton Roads 
readoshtp to toss out the TV (v pull the plug on 
the "boob tube." The article, written by Kerry 
Dougherty, asked the reader to set forth in SO 
wads a less how its Csmily ought to be featured in 
Real Life as a family willing to go cold turkey 
without television for the month of January. The 
story promised pictures and progress reports on 
each family that the paper selected to participate. 

My conscience was seared by the paper's brazen 
dare, as I realized uncomfortably that I had been 
watching too much TV of late. The conviction 
grew stronger, and on Monday night turned to 
resolution, culminating in action. Without a word 
to my wife, I simply did not turn on the 6 p.m. new. 
We talked about the day's events, read and retired 
eariy. I awoke Tuesday morning with a fresh sense 
of cleanliness and trod off to work. 

I didn't know what was going on in Bosnia or 
what the weather was going to be like. Jamn Bond 
had come and gone without my attention, and I 



tuning into life 

had not played along with the "Jeopardy" 
contestants, but what had I lost? 

Tuesday and Wednesday have now come and 
gone, and the self-imposed fast continues. I don't 
know what the results wUl be, but I think that the 
TV blackout will be a very nice and meaningful 
Christmas present to my wife. 

She thinks that our abstinence from television 
may help us focus on the real meaning of 
Christmas, and she believes that something 
precious has been lost amidst the tinsel and lights. 

Maybe we will draw nearer to the Lord. 
Hopefully, we will become closer to each other as 
we reclaim some of our living space and foreclose 
on media input. Who knows? 

This morning, I called the Pilot and stopped the 
paper temporarily. The RufTms have decid^ to let 
the fast continue through the Christmas season. 

What good will it yield? 

We shall see what we shall see. 

Robert D. RufTm 
Baileywick Drive 



When does inclusion become delusion? 




Richmond 
Response 

By Robert 
Holland, cidum' 
rUtt 



Washington'sEducationtopayoff 
a political debt outlays for ec^ation 
an a great to the lefist Natbnid 
Bducation Asboon to pap« and 
ofRce-aipply businesses, butprecious 
little of that tax moiwy filim down to 
the nation's classrooms. 
Consider that . . . 
■ The federal government is 
responsible for 
SS percent of 
thepaperworic 
that local 
schools must . 
generate, but 
only S percent 
of total support 
for educatkm, 
aKonUngtoa 
study done in 
Ohio. 

■ Federally 
funded 
bureaucrats 
come close to 
outnumbering 
statefunded 
piq>er-pusher8 
in many state departments of 
ediKation. In fact, in scnne sm&i they 
do. 

Florida's DOE has 596 feds to 366 
state bureaucrats, while the 
Ineakdown in Illinois is 411 to 400. 
And in Michigan, there are a 
whopping 1.S97 fedoal K> S88 st^ 
educrats, according to General 
Accounting Office figures. 

The U.S. Dq}aitment of Education 
—call it USDOE, or DEd, or ED, or 
actually better DEAD than ED— is 
responsible for much of this 
bureaucr^ization of education. Its 
budget of $33 Mllion is ^read over 
244^ograms. 

DEd accounu for about half of the 
total feckral presence in education. 
An additional 30 federal agencies 
spend $37 billion on anotha 308 
|Mt)0ams affecting educukm. But 
DEdhasbecome—rigMy— the fool 
point of efforts in Conp^s 10 \ooam 
Big Government's iron grip on 
sclwoling. 

Sixteen years after President 
JimmyQ0terameddieDe{»fftmoit 
of A^ocitfkm. many whovraric(k)wn 
in the benches for |wbUc educRti(M 
are becoming awwe of whM a dead 
weight D^ is. An inAcatkm of dut 
cttiK in a r^xnt siffv^ the An^icm 
School Board Jmmial tock of its 
rectos: 

Almost three-fourths of the 
respondsits (school bcwd members 
and administrators) said 
emphatfcally— This depammA is 
bad news. Abolish it" 

DEd, said a California scImwI 
administrator, "is part of a 
bweucracy that is out of oxMrol am) 
oatofMKh with reality . Ha^iritH^. 



what has it done for us? Nothing 
positive that I can Mnk of." 

Indeed, with its regional lab(Hr- 
atories and diffusion; network, DEd 
shills for «wmed-ova"progns8ive" 
reforms that border on the fraudident. 

For instance, it has sprat hundreds 
of thousands of dollars to plug 
Johnson City, N. Y., as a national 
nuxiel of successful Outcome-Based 
Education. Yet, in 1994, JcrtmsonQty 
ranked dead lastin third-gradereading 
semes among the 12 Khool di^cts 
in its region. It could be a modd only 
tor such an Outcome as high self- 
esteem— or false pride. 

As long as 

President Clinton 

and the 

Republican 

Congress are at 

loggerheads, 

however, it is 

doubtful that 

more than baby 

steps will be 

taken. 



As long as President Qinton and 
the Republican Congress are at 
loggerheads, however, it is doid>tftil 
that more than iMby tteps will be 
taken toward terminating DEd or its 
ugly offshoots. 

Goals 2000, one of the newest and 
thorniest growths, may be trimmed. 

The Hou« has p^sed a bill- 
pending in the Senate — that would 
eliminate the 19-membCT Natkmal 
Education Standards and 
ImiHovement Council, whk;h was to 
have sat in judgmoit on sQDKisrds 
developed by the states. The 



Clintonites haven't objected to 
NESIC'ttlemise, b^ause they know 
ample Ocmls 2000 bureaucracy will 
remain to take up the slack. 

InthegrettbudgetbBttle,theHou8e 
prop(»es to z«o*fund Goals 2000, 
but the Smate— led by "modoate" 
Republican and erstwMlepre^dostial 
pnaadet Arlen Specter —wants to 
salvage the prc^ram. Ami Clinton 
wants to inaease it. 

Larger questions about die fedeial 
role in education may become a 
significant issue in next Spring's 
presidential primaries. House 
Rq;)ublicans have H1883, the Back 
to Basics Bill, waiting in die wings. It 
would scuttte the Department of 
Education but move some of its 
functioi»totheDqMfftment(^Heidd) 
and Human Services. 

Another bill in the works, 
tentatively called the "Restoring 
Local Schools Act," would go 
furtho-— putting viruiaUy the entbe 
$70 billion federal role in education 
on the chopping bkxk. 

JimJac(^98on aid Mike Hammond 
have i^epared a welldocumented 
rqxMt for the National Cent» fw 
Home Education detailing die extent 
to which school programs are 
dispersed throughout die federal 
establishment For example, nine 
fedoal departments a* agencies run 
86 programs to send leachos to con- 
favnces for retraining. 

Fat chance that Congress or die 
administration wcHiid go along widi 
zi|q>ing, say, $4 billion for Inject 
Head Start, the LBJ-era incschool 
propam, cqierated under HHS, diat 
hu beomie a pet of both political 
{w^s. Pralnps, however, die very 
makfaig of such an audacious {soposal 
would incrrase die likelihood that— 
in the {»ocess of deciding what 
pognxM (Might to be sav^i— the 
DEd ttsdf mig^t finally get die ax. 
Robert Holland is a syndicated 
colmvdst who writes for Associated 
Features, 



— h: 

The Virginia Beach Sun Deadlines 

News dndlin«ftir Hie Virginia Beach Sun McMond^ at Sp.m. Ux 
die upcoming Friday's imie. 

• Article must be legibte, prdtNably typed, douUe-qnced on stan- 
dffld-sized pap^*. 

• nchVM must be sharp, clew wd accOTqwiied widi cmnpteie 
infwmadtm. 

• News may be Ixought or maiM in sMi dKNdd include the nane Mid 
telqihone numbera of die p^sm sirijmitting it 

• Tl« Virginia Beach Sun welcomes md Mcowagn letters from its 
rewfers on iqMcs of goicra! intscst 

•All fetters mofi carry the naoKMidaddren of writs- for veriflcadmi. 

• Lettos riNMiU be adcfrened to; Ediio-, Tlw Virginia Beach Sun, 138 
SoutfiRM<3nomRc«t,Suiie209. Virginia B6a(A.Va.234S2. Phone: 486- 
3430. 




The Real 
World 

By B.J. Set- 
aiont, aerUor col- 
umnist. 



Random ramblings 
on the condition of 
good, ole'Anaerica 

Wtoi I first heard d^ Michad 
JackSMi h»l b6«i mdied to the 
ho^^, I dunigjit to myself, "I Ik^ 
hedoesn'tdie,becau%wecan'taffoid 
anodier long period of moumiiig." 

Hell, we're sdll in nKMBming for 
Elvis Presfey, Jdm L^moQ, Jeny 
Garcia of "The Gtat^iil Dead" and 
Wolfman Jack. I am concerned, 
however, 
about Mic- 
hael's prob- 
lem, and I 
thinklknow 
what it is. He 
hasUeached 
himself 
almost out (tf 
existence 
trying to be 
white, and it 
is b^utuUng 
to take its tid. 
My advice to 
hiinbtostay 
away from 
die Clorox. 

'^~~"''"^~'~ amusing to 
hearWhoqii 
Goklberg, die wel&re expnt, giving 
testimony to "Blubber Butt" Ted 
Kennedy about her opinion of 
welfare. Whoopi says that she was cm 
welfare for 10 years and, had it not 
been for welfare, she wouldn't be 
whoe she is today — a very rich 
woman. Now diat welfare has made 
her a rich woman, I wonder if die 
would be willing to give back to die 
taxpay^ die money diat she received 
when she was on die dole. 

I doubt it 

Speaking about Teddy Kennedy 
(die hero of Chqipaquiddick uid 
women'srights),itwassadtoseediis 
pathetic slob whose weight is 
zocnning toward die 400-poundmark 
trying to board a boat diat v««s lied up 
at a pin-. He could not stqi aboard, 
which is die normal diing to do. lb 
had to lay (k>wn on Uie pi« and roU 
over into die boat. 

This man whose liberal duiddng tt 
one time had him one of die most 
dangoous men in die Soiate is no 
longer taken seriously by hit 
colleagues. He AouU join die odier 
Democrats whoareleaviiig die Ifouae 
UKi Senate like lemmbigs. 

Unfortunately, Kennedy will not 
leave and his seat in die Senate is 
secure. Hie people of Massachuaettt 
would voiefor an aardnnk if it wu in 
any way connected to dw Kennet^. 
I am Kncnoed about IM's witfim 
(no pdn innmde^o^eeiffie he 
resonbled a beached whale when he 
was trying to roll over into dw bott. 
and I fiuu-someNorwegiui fishennm 
might try to stick a haipoon in him. 
Stay away from die wtter, Ted. 

Last but not least is the good newt 
diat Pat Schroeder, die "Qmgreu 
Lady" from Colorado, is redrtaig. Ftt, 
die one widi die perpetual siUy grbi, 
die droopy left eye and a voice diat 
sounded as if she was talking diroug^ 
hei noM widi her teedi clunped diut, 
is finally giving up. 

I could ^te volumes about dUs 
silly, man-hating woman, but qiace 
willnotaUow it However, iheopened 
die door for me in a recoit faiterview 
wh«i in desoibing her house said: "I 
toil^ trained my chiklren here and 
went dirough menopause here and, if 
I'm going to do anydiing dse, I have 
to do it now." 

You could have fooled me, Ptt, I 
didn't think you ever finished 
menopause. 

Weto(nne to die real world. 



Tlie Virginia Beacli Sun 

138 Soadi RowmoBt Riwd 

8dt«2W 

VlrgtailaBMdl,Va.234S2 

TabpliOMi(804)4W-34M 

(U^S«0>144} 

Pttbttter 
HmaiByarly 

Edttkirai Supo^jiior 
Janie Brown 

Editor 
VktoriaHMOit 

CoBporitiai 
MJ.KnoUod( 

The Vir||iii« Btadi Sm is pA- 
Udied every Aiday by Bywly PiAUoa- 
tioni. Iiw., 1000 Armory Drivo, 
l^mUn.VB^nla23831.SeeandaaH 
poitti* pdd in I^BiUin. Vb|aiia md 
addiliraal anoy ofhew. Pomb^nm: 
S«d addmi diiBias to 1000 Airaory 
Mvt, AnUin. Vt^iiiia 23831, Sris 
lo^itiim Rum: By maU addrwM 
widiin 4a milM of Vir^iU Bwrtu 
Vl., 0!» yew, $14.93. two ye^, 
$26.%. Viqfaiii nd Nt^fli CsoUna, 
one yea, %\6.U, two yem, $29.30. 
AU odw ttttn ow j^K, $22.00^ two 
yevi, $34 JO. P^Ale fa idvaiec. 

O&tei Byely Publicatkms aem- 
pq>9t: The ChMipeeke !H>tt, The 
Porttmouth Timet, The TidewM« 
News, The h«Mwi^1teM-<taMM, 
The brf^cMtet M«i^^, The 
Miwiddte Mentor. TWt Hm^brng 
Mmtor. 



Virginia Beach Sun. Rridav. Decembg 15. 1995 3 



Pick a park for a perfect 
picnic, party or outing 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf 



EeUtor's note: This is the contUm- 
ation of a two-part series on Virginia 
Beach's public parks. 

Mraint TrashnKMB ftrit is a 162- 

aciepntoe^ttedfiomdieokl Virginia 

Beach landfill bwdered by Holland 

Road, Edwin Drive and South 

Boulevard. The project was begun in 

1968 and 

took almost 

five years to 

complete. A 

mountain 

68-feet high 

and 800-feet 

long was 

built by the 

compacting 

layers of 

solid waste 

and clean 

soil. Layers 

consist of 

198 inches of 

waste and six 

inches of 

clean soil. 

The park is 

~'~'"""~^~~ open ypar- 

round from 

7:30 a.m. - sunset. 

Facilities include: four large and 
11 small picnic shelters, one large 
and one small skateboard ramp, 
playground areas, a basketball court, 
four volleyball areas, parking, 
restrooms and a Visitor's Center 
wh^e infcnmadon about the park may 
be obtained. 

A new exciting addition at Ml 
Trashmore Park, Kids Cove, is an 
innovative playground designed for 
children using children's ideas and 
input. The playground (which is 
handicapped accessible) was con- 
structed totally by volunteers and 
coordhiated by the Virginia Beach 
Junior. Woman's Club. Approxi- 
mately 4,400 volunteersassistedwith 
this pr-GJecL 

For more information abort Mount 
Trashmore Park, you may call the 
Park Office at 473-5251. 

Munden Point Park is located at 
2100 Pefley Ln. in the Pungo 
Borough. The i»rk has 2,100 acres 
located on the North Landing River, 
a major leg of the Intercoastal Water- 
way, in the southern portion of the 
city. The park is open from 7 a.m. - 
sunset during the summer. 

Facilities include: five large 
shelters, l6mini-dielters,aboatramp, 
thrM.iaUfieids. three basketball 
courts, a fitness trail, three pl^- 
grounds, six horseshoe pits,boatrent- 
als, volleyball stationsand restrooms. 
For mpre information on Munden 
Point Park, call the Park Office at 
426-5296. , 

Princess Anne Parte, a 90-acre 
district park, is located at the comCT 
of Landstown Road and Princess 
Anne Road in the Princess Anne 
Borough. The park is open year round 
for 7:30 a.m. - 1 1 p.m,. except from 
December throu^ March the park 
closes at sunset. 

Facilities include: six lighted tennis 
courts, three lighted basketball courts, 
three large group shelters, family 
picnic sites and grills, playgrounds, 
volleyball courts, horseshoe pits, 
concessions and restrooms. The park 
also has seven lighted fields used for 
baseball/soflball and football; and six 
uniighted soccer fields, which are 
used {(X soccer, field hockey and 
rugby, depending upon the season. 
Fields may be rented, on a limited 
basis, by calling the Athletic Unit at 
471-5884. 

A horse ring is available at the park 
for lease by calling 563-1 100. If you 
have your own horse, riding pr^tice 
is held each Tuesday and Thursday 
from 6 - 10 p.m. from Apil through 
October. Proof of Coggins 
vaccination is required prior to 
participating.Forfurther information 
about Princess Anne Parte, you may 
call the Parte Office at 427-6020. 

Red Wing I^rtc is a 90-»;re district 
park located on General Booth 
Boulevard. The property, formerly 



the "de* city poor farm," WIS aoiuiied 
by the county in 1 879 iuid (tevelop^ 
in 1966by thecityasafemUy.^neral 
use park. The park is open year round 
from 7:30 a.m. - simset. 

Facilities include: four tennis 
courts, a basketball court, four 
volleyball courts, two handball/ 
ractpjcttall courts, badminton couis, 
hOTscshoe pits, five shelto^, three 
playgroundaieas, three Softball fields, 
nature trails, four gardens, picnic 
areas,grills,afitn^stml,q}enfiekis, 
restrooms and wooded areas. For 
more information about Red Wing 
Parte, call the Park Office at 437- 
4847. 

Woodstock Community Park is a 
30-acre park located at 5709 
Providence Rd. in Kempsville Bor- 
(Migh. The i^k is qioi year round 
fitom 7:30 a.m. - sunseL 

Facilities include: three large group 
picnic shelters, playground, two 
volleyball courts, two tennis courts, 
horseshoe pits, a Softball field, a 
playing field and restrooms. For more 
information about Woodstock I^ik, 
you may call the Park Office at 366- 
4538. 

Owl Creek Boat Ramp, located off 
General Booth Boulevard, is open to 
the public for access to RiKlee Inlet 
and the Atlantic Ocean. No ramp fee 
is charged. For more information, 
call 561-1 100. 

Owl Creek Municipal Tennis 
CentCT, located at 928 S. Birdneck 
Rd., just down the road from the boat 
ramp, is a multi-court complex with 
courtsavailableonaresovation basis. 
A fee is charged to use the courts at 
Tennis Center (S4 per court hour for 

Special events 

are held in district 

paries throughout 

the year, such as 

Family Fun Day, 

Princess Anne 

Arts and Crafts 
Festival, Fishing 

Clinic, Family 

Fridays and 

mo re. 

achilts - singles for doubles; senior 
citizens are charged half price, as 
well as players under the age of 18); 
and your reservation ensures your 
time on the courts. 

Tennis classes and a pro shop are 
available on site. Minishelters are 
available for picnics. Tennis leagues 
and tournaments are held periodically 
at the Tennis Center. Additionally, 
tennis classes and clinics, for ages 4 
and up, are offered at various sites 
and times throughout the city, 
including some parks, recreation 
centers and high schools. 

Tennis clinics are also offered at 
various times of the year for junior 
and adult players. Open play for tennis 
enthusiasts is also available at any 
public tennis court (public schools, 
parks and recreations centers on a 
first come, fu-st serve basis at not 
charge, and providing the courts are 
not in use for city classes/clinics or 
school functions). For more 
information on tennis and to register, 
please call 437-4804. 

Special events are held in district 
parks throughout the year, such as 
Family Fun Day, ftincess Anne Arts 
and Crafts Festival, Fishing Clinic, 
Family Ridays, K-9 IMsbee Compe- 
tition, De^gonest Dog Show and 
mwe. For infcmnation on special 
events, call 471-5884. 

In addition to the i^ks listed, that 
ue 173 neightx^hood parks scattered 
throughout the city. 

Phyllis Maness, administrative 
assistant for the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks andRecreation, 
contributed to this column. 



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Up close and personal 

!Bo n/vooa±: <^ockLn axouna ike cloa^ 



By VICTORIA HECHT 
Sun Ediuy 

Quick! Name, a bundle of energy with 
"California blonde" good looks, endless 
energy and a fast comeback for most 
anything duomi his way? Hus, he does it all 
while hiost of us are just getting out of bed 
or driving to work! 

If it's a wake-up dose of "Good mOTning. 
Hampton Roads" that you need, then Bo 
Woods is there to deliver to the tune of 
Aretha Ranklin's feel-good "Respect" or The 
Be^h Boys' energizing "Surfin' Safari." 

The product of a "radio family," as he 
likes to call it. Oldies 95.7's morning disc 
jockey has woHced the airwaves from coast 
to coast — Tijuana, Mexico to New York 
City. For the past year he has called 
Hampton Roads home at Virginia Beach- 
based WLTY. 

And he's loving every minute of itJ 

"Well, it is a wild and crazy business," 
Woods admitted between bites of potato 
chips at 10 a.m. (he does, after all, get up at 
4:30, so junk food this early is, well, lunch 
to him). "It's a business of entertainment, 
and that was ^q)ealing to me." 

The son of a disc jockey (his father) and 
radio station general manager (his mother). 
Woods grew up near the California surfing 
scene. His parents work in the Ventura- 
Oxnard radio market 

"Next to Pungo, it's the strawberry capital 
of the world!" he laughed. "Hmm, I wonder if 
there's some kind of discrepancy there?" 

But Woods wasn't destined to work the 
strawberry fields. Radio was in his blood 
from the start. Graduating from the 
University of Southern California-Los 
Angeles in 1987, he dropped the bomb on 
his parents. 

"To be totally truthful, I told my parents 
that I was going to become a waiter because 
I didn't know what I wanted to do. I decided 
I was going to Pensacola, Fla., leave 
Southern California and go live with a buddy 
who had graduated from the Naval Academy 
and was down there in flight school. I was 
going to hang out on the beach," he 
reminisced. 

Needless to say, his parents weren't 
thrilled, so they made him an offer: work at 
the radio station they owned at the time. 
Woods signed on from 2 to 4 a.m., just long 
enough to make an aircheck tape to send out 
with resumds across the country. 

Then, he packed the car and headed for 
Pensacola, stopping along Uic way for job 
interviews at various radio stations. Then, 
the call came: an AM station in 
Albuquerque, N.M. just had to have Bo 
Woods for their midnight to 6 a.m. shift. 

"For $9,000." he remembered. "I said, 'I 
have just driven across the country. I've still 
got the miles in my head. I'll be there in two 
days!" 

With his foot finally in the door. Woods' 
career would lead him down many roads 
after that — until he finally ended up in 
Virginia Beach. Enamored with the area 
("it's not too big and not too small"). Woods 
sees himself staying here a long time. 

This is his first stab at the "morning 
drive," the most highly-coveted shift among 
disc jockeys. 

"I'm finding that you have have to be 
much quicker paced and much more 
topical," he admitted. "You have to relate to 
listeners in a shorter amount of time because 
the folks are in the shower or in the car. And 
you've got to do it without being ainoying!" 
Too much radio today. Woods contends, is 
sensationalistic. 

"I would hope that I'm not too sarcastic, 
because my persona is genuinely upbeat, 
happy and carefree. If you listen to a lot of 
radio stations, they're too sarcastic with their 
comedy. For example, everyone makes fun 
of the president. Now don't get me wrong, 
you need to relate to the president. But for 
me to be sarcastic, that's just one more joke 
that doesn't need to be told, even though I 
like to have as much fun as the next guy." 

Insteffil, Woods said, he likes to focus his 
attention on the people who "make" him 
what he is: the listeners. 

"I'm just here pushing the buttons, 
answering the phone and keeping the music 
moving. I give the weather, some headlines 
and talk about the traffic. After that, nothing 
would make me happier than having the 
listeners provide the stuff." 

And those li^encts — oldies fans — are a 
bre«d unto themselves. 

"They're extremely funny and intelligent, 
and they're got some incredible 
observations," he noted. As for the music, 
sounds of the '50s, '60s and '70s, Woods 
remembered boyhood days sitting Indian- 
style in his bedroom taping oldies off the 
radio and practicing his best deejay 
impersonations. 

Now J» ju^ gets paid to (to something he 
loves. 

"We must be the iuckirat guys in the 
worid," he observed. "In what other living 
can you Ik introducing 11» Be^h Boys at 
the Sth Street sti^e me ni^t, then ^t 
Junior Walker's autograph and go to 
Wolfman Jack's fiin»al?" 

As fcH' th(»e who ay oldies f^is we "Mdc 
in the past," Woods offoed a cballen^. 

'Vm th<^e who are sick of tte vgument 
atKJut old masic versus new music," he 
challenged, "I'll leave you with this: y«i 
show me a piano player who plays hmtx 
than Jerry Lee Lewis, at a guitarist bMW 




than Chuck Berry, and I'll believe. But I 
believe that this music, without a doubt, is 
the best. It's talent — real talent — and it's 
passionate." 

Name: Bo Woods. 

What brought you to this area: I 

was working at an oldies, station in 
Dallas, Texas when Randal C. Bliss (my 
current t)0ss at Oldies 95.7) called. We 
had been pen pals. I'd never worked 
with him, but was aware of him and his 
work at other radio stations in other cities 
and knew how successful he was and 
that everything he touched seemed to 
turn to gold. So the fact that I'd be 
working for him at such a well-known 



Favorite night out on the town: 

Dinner, a hockey game and/or a 
concert/play. 



Favorite restaurant: 

Dumbwaiter in Norfolk." 



The 




statton in a city where oldies listeners are 
fun, intelligent and appreciative of good 
musk: made it easy for me to make the 
move. 

Hometown: Bom in Dallas, raised in 
San Diego and have lived in Houston, 
Indianapolis, Cleveland, New York City, 
Denver, Washington, D.C. and 
Alexandria. 

Blrthdate: Arrived in '64, about the 
sanrte time as The Beatles did! 

Nickname: I was born James, in two 
months it went to Jim. in three months 
to Jln^, in four months to Bo, and it 
has studc ever since! 

Occnpatloa: Moming disc jockey (6 
to 10 a.m.) on Oldies 95.7 (WLTY). 

Marital SUtus: Eligible. 

Children: Not any yet, but I have two 
prectous nieces — Madelaine, 2, and 
Bailey, 18 months. 

Favorite movies: My favorite 
movies of all time are "Against All Odds" 
arKJ "Revere" with Kevin Costner and 
Madelaine Stowe. Both of these movies 
strike a romantk:, sensual and sexy 
chonl. 

llMA^iM I refttlarly read: Radio 
and Reconis (an imfastry paper), Rolling 
^na and J.F.K Jr.'s r»w George. 

Favorite authors: I'm currently 
reading '^our Money or Your Life" by 
Joe Domlr^ez and Vlcki Rol^n. 



Favorite meal: It used to be Spam 
and baked beansj now it's a burger at 
The Raven. ' 

i . ■ . 

What most people don't know 
about me: I'm the lead singer of Larry 
Z and The Woodpeckers, a Southern 
California blues band that performs 
annually. t 

Best thing about myself: My 

ability to entertain on the air and in 
person. 

Worst habit: Worrying too much and 
biting my fingernails. They must go hand 
in hand, no pun intended! 

Pets: My boy "Diddley," a 1 -year-old 
Golden Retriever. 

Hobbles: Exercise, swimming and 
collecting performers' autographs — my 
latest being Junior Walker's just months 
before he passed away. 

Ideal vacation: Driving a four-wheel 
vehicle through Central and South 
America, visiting ruins of ancient 
civilizations from Mexico City to Costa 
Rica on down to Peru and Chile. 

Pet peeves: I don't have any. 

First Job: Working midnight to 6 a.m. 
on an AM station in Albuquerque, N.M. 

Worst Job: I was living in San Diego 
and working nights (7 p.m. to midnight) 
on an English-speaking station in 
Tijuana, Mexico. I would cross the 
border and drive 30 minutes to get to a 
cinderblock building located directly 
undemeath the four legs of a 250,000 
watt tower. There were no windows, and 
the studio walls were covered with 
orange miniature golf carpet for sound- 
proofing. 

Favorite sports teams: Has to be 

the San Diego Chargers during the Dan 
Fouts/Kellen Winstow/Charlie Joiner era. 

Favorite musicians: I find myself 
really getting into the music that came 
out of this regton in the '50s and '60s -^ 
the Church Street sounds of Norfolk, 
including Jimmy Soul and Gary U.S. 
Bonds. One of my all-time favorite 
experiences since I've lived here was to 
meet Dickie Harrell from Portsmouth, the 
original daimmer for Gene Vincent and 
The Blue Caps ("Be-Bop-A-Lu-La"). 
Dckie and I have become ctose and, as 
a matter of fact, I had him on the 
nwming show playing his drums just a 
few weeks ago. He and his, Donna, and 
I have dinner once or twtee a nronth. 

I ^uld Uke my epitaph to read: 

Read? I don't even expect It to write! 



If I received $1 million: I'd fly 

home and tell my parents in person, 
then the same with my sister and her 
family and my brother and his family. 
Then we'd spend the week somewhere 
exclusive and expensive... on me! 

If I had 10 minutes on national 
television: I'd have to spend it 
singing. I'm not a good singer, but it 
beats my tap dancing! 



■^■ia 



mw'^^mj liH Jgii fg! J^p _ i^^P'^t^P^p^iP^p^^i^pp!! 



4 Virrinii Bwich Sim. Pricfay. I^^mber 15. 1995 



X j9£ /aRTS 



Sing along with Handel's 'Messlals' 



The beauty of Christmas has 
never been as powerfully 
expressed than in the great 
musical work of Handel's 
Messiah. And once again, the 
Virginia Beach Symphony 
Orchestra brings the Tidewater 
area an cqypcmunity to participate 
in Handel's ntagniflcent creation 
with the annual "Messiah" Sing- 
Along. 

The Virginia Beach Symphony 
Orchestra's "Messiah" Sing- 
Along, which is free and opened 
10 all interested singers, will be 
held at the Pavilion Theatre on 
Monday, Dec. 18 at 8 p.m. There 
are no tickets or reservations; the 
event is strictly held on a first- 
come, first-served basis. 

The "Messiah" Sing-Along will 
feature soloists Linda Jo Van 
Wagner (soprano), Lou-Anne 



Dreschler-Payne (mezzo 
soprano), Jeff Joyner (tenor) and 
Leslie J. Wasserman Jr. 
(baritone). And. as in most sing- 
along events throughout the 
country, it will spotlight the 
audience as the chorus. 

The orchestra and featured 
soloists will be conducted by 
David S. Kunkel, the Virginia 
Beach Symphony's music 
director, and Mark Hudgiia will 
direct the audience (the chcvus). 

It has been requested that 
audience members provide their 
own music and are prepared to 
sing ail of the choruses in Part I 
as well as from the "Hallelujah 
Chorus" to the end of Handel's 
work. (Music for Handel's 
"Messiah" may be obtained from 
any music store and aUo wiU be 
available for purchase at the 



Sing-Along.) 

The Pavilion Theatre is a part 
of the Virginia Beach Convention 
Center located at the end ctf 
Route 44 (the Virginia Beach 
Expressway). It has plenty of free, 
well-lit parking and has 
handicapped veas. 



It's 



Murder at the Beadil Ring in the 
new year with a bang or two — ot 
maybe evraduee. 

Maverick I^oductions will pre- 
sent a full wedraid murdo- mystery 
featuring the talents of rame of Uie 
best acu)rs in Tidewater Dec. 30 - 
Jan. 1 at the Howard Jdinsons at 
18th Su^t and Atlantic Avenue in 
Virginia Beach. 

CaU 437-9100 for further details. 




Ttie name says It all in the Founcters Inn Dinner Theatre produdlon of Frank Caprs's traditional holid^ 
dassic "It's a Wonder^ Ufe." Ptaving now through Jan. 3. m deH^rtlui itege ac^Uon t^ Michael Tllford 
capUires the es^nce of the ttmetess tale that touches everyone at Christmas. "It's a Wonderful Life" is the 
story of George Bailey, who, after living his life In "SnttlKown, U.SA" and sacrificing ^at ambitions and 
(fttsams for his family and friends, fines himself on tfie brink of flnandtf ruin, it takes a wingless angel 
named Qanntx to make him realize that it reai^ has b^n a wonderful life. For tidcets, call 366-5749. 



...Or listen to the professionals 



Music Director JoAnn Falletta 
and the Virginia Symphony and 
Chorus will bring a musical sym- 
bol of Christmas to Hampton 
Roads residents when they per- 
form George Fridcric Handel's 
"Messiah" D«;. 22-23 at 8 p.m. at 
Norfolk's Harrison Opera Hou%. 

Chorus Master Donald McCul- 
lough will direct the Virginia 
Symphony Chorus featuring so- 
pruio Amy Johnson, mezzo-so- 
prano Diane Willis-Stahl, tenor 
Jonathan Mack and baritone 
Thomas Paul. "Messiah" is fa- 
mous for its "Hallelujah" chorus. 
. This concert is a special two- 
evening event. 

At its first performance more 
than 250 years ago, Handel's 
"Messiah" was a huge success. It 
grew gradually into one of the 
best known and most loved pieces 
of classical music. Much of its 
appeal lies in its suitability for 



both small and large perfc^ming 
groups, and for both amateur and 
professimial musicians. 

But beyond that, this music is 
appreciated by many kinds of au- 
diences because tht message of 
the words eximsMd through the 
music has universal meaning. Al- 
though the test is clearly Chris- 
tian in its literal interinetation, its 
basic themes — life and death, 
sacrifice and rebirth — speak to 
and give hope to all. 

Both Friday's and Saturday's 
performances of "Messiah" are 
.presented by the Christian Broad- 
casting Network. 

Ticket prices for "Messiah" 
range from $14 to $40. Tickets 
may be purchased by calling the 
Virginia Symphony Ticket Store 
at 623-2310, at any branch of 
First Virginia Bank, or by calling 
Tickctmaster at 671-8100. 



Children's Chorus presents Jan. 
production ' Caroler of Winter' 



The Virginia Children's Chorus 
family concert, "The Caroler of 
Winter," will be held on Sauirday, 
Jan 13 at 4 p.m. at First 
Presbyterian Church, 820 Colonial 
Avenue in Ghent. 

Tickets are $S for adults; no 
charge for children under 12 or 
seniors. Tickeu are available at the 
door or by calling 397-0779, 
weekdays 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. There is 
no reserved seating and the doors 
will open at 3:30 p.m. 

This performance promises to be 
a shining example of choral 
excellence and will feature 
selections by Aractelt. McCartney, 



Plude, Naghan Williams and Wolf. 

The children ranging in age from 
6 to 16 are under the direction of 
Carol Thomas Downing, an 
experienced singer, violinist and 
children's choral director who has 
trained young musicians from 
preschool through the university 
level. In addition to directing the 
Virginia Children's Chorus, she 
serves on the faculties of The 
Academy of Music in Norfolk and 
The Walden School for Young 
composers in Dublin, N.H. 

Auditions for Virginia Children's 
Chorus will be held Jan. 16 and 20 
in Norfolk. 



Ring in the new year in 'Vienna' 



A champagne tasting and the 
music of Johann Strauss will be 
the highlight of "A Night In Old 
Vienna," a special New Year's 
event featuring Music Director 
JoAnn Falletta and the Virginia 
Symphony on Sunday, Dec. 31 at 
the Hanison Opera House. 

"A Night In Old Vienna" will 
feature a two-hour program in- 
cluding Strauss' "Thunder and 
Lightin Polka," "Fledermaus 
Overture," "Blue Danube," 
"Radetsky March" and Suppe's 
"Morning, Noon and Night in Vi- 
enna." 



The evening cOTcludes with a 
balloon drop ^d "prize pq)ping" 
in the (^ra house at 10:20 p.m. 
Concert-goers can purchase ^- 
cial pins for a $3 donation to be 
used to pop balloons during in- 
termission. 

Tickets for "A Night In Old Vi- 
enna" range from $20 to $40 and 
include the champagne tasting. 

Tickets may be purchased by 
calling the Virginia Symphony 
Ticket Store at 623-2310, at any 
l»anch of First Virginia Bank, or 
by calling Ticketmastcr at 671- 
8100. 







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Hampton Roads on the Move 



Local OB/Gyn explains risks, breast cancer prevention 



By Peter J. Kemp, M.D. 

Breast cancer accounts for 
approximately 32 percent of all 
cancers in women in the United 
States. It is the second leading 
cause of death from cancer in 
women aged from 35 to 54 years. It 
is felt that approximately one in 
nine women will develop breast 
cancer. It is noted diu women in an 
uppct social ecomxnic gtoap have a 
M^er incidoice of lH«ast cfflicer and 
that it is more common in white 
women ov^ 45 years of age than in 
black women. A personal or family 
history of breast cancer increases 
the risk of breast cancer. It is also 
known that if you have a first 
degree relative with breast cancer, 
there is a two- to three-tima higher 



incidence of breast cancer than in 
the. general population. It is also 
known that a risk of t»east cancer 
increases with age. 

Onsets of periods earlier in life 
and late menopause are also 
associated with an inciea» in breast 
cancer. Another factor is lactation, 
where someone who has breast fed 
may decrease the risk of breast 
canoa. 

Some of the ways that women 
can prevent or have early detection 
of breast cancer are by routine 
exiuninations. The firat thing is a 
monthly self breast exam. 

Thae are several ways of doing 
this, one way is in die ^wer, you 
can examine yourself once a month 



Beach Fed l\/lortgage Corp 
names Hull, Yoder to board 



Beach Fed Mortgage Corp has 
named Kevin W. Hull and Edward 0. 
Ted" Yod« to its Boardof Directors. 
Hullisvk:e 
piesidentand 
branch man- 
agerofBeach 
Fed's Chesa- 
peake office 
in the Gr^n- 
Werarea. 

He joined 
Beach Fed in 
September 
1994 from 
National City 
Mortgage 
where he wm a loan originauv for 
four years. Hull earned a ^chelor of 
science degree in Business 
Management from George Mason 
University. 

Yoder is vice president and branch 




Yoder 



iiianager of Beach Fed's Virginia 
J Beach offlce 
at Pavilion 
I Center. 

He joined 
I Beach Fed in 
iDecember 
1994. Yoder 
I received his 
degree from 
East Carolina 
University 
I and serves on 
the boards of 
the Tide- 
water Mortgage Bankers Association 
and the South Hampton Roads 
Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. 

Beach Fed Mortage Coip. is a 
subsidiary of Virginia Beach Federal 
Savings Bank. 

The bank is a 60-year-old 
conmunity-focused institution which 
Mrves Hampton Roads. 




NC - RICH - NY - PHIL - WASH - DC - MD 





teven B. Powers, M.D. 

Board Certified OB/GYN 

Peter J. Kemp, M.D. 
Susan Preston, N.P 

Okmtrics A Gynecology 

We are pleased to announce the 
assumption of patient care for 
Gad E. Brosch, M.D. 

md continued care of his patients. 

^ro^db^ FanUy C^te^ n»-Natal Out 
•IM CoMol • Gyme^gie fc Umt Sni|ay 

495-9400 .JX:tZ^> 436-0167 

S26S frtMi^ M. p^ . limuM h Trerttd ^ KmgAormuk Sqmm 



by raising you arm, and with your 
fingers, touch each part of the 
breast gently with the flat parts of 
your finders, feeling for lumps or 
thickening. "1116 right hand is uKd 
to examine the left breast, and the 
left hand is used to examine the 
right breast. You can also lode in 
the mirror, place your hands on 
your hips, with your arms at your 
sides and look carefully for any 
changes in shqie and ccmtour of 
each breast, look for puckering, 
dimpling or changes in skin 
texture. You should also gently 
squeeze both nipples to look for 
any discbar^. 

A self exam is not a substitute 
for periodic exams by your doctor 
or health care provider. If there is 
any question as far as your Aiding a 
lump, then you should consult your 
health care provider. 

Mammograms are another 
screening test that is used for 
detection of breast cmoet. It is felt 
that mammograms are probably 



credited with reducing death from 
Imast cwcer, up to 30 percent. A 
baseline mammogram should be 
obtained on all womoi between the 
ages of 35 to 40 years of age. 
Mammography is suggested every 
one to two ytm in women between 
the age of 40 to 50 years, d^nding 
upon clinical evaluation of the risk 
factors. Annual mammography 
should be performed in women over 
age 50 years. This is currently the 
guidelines by the Americmi College 
of OBAjyn and also the American 
Cancer Society. 

In review, the most important 
things that can be done to prevent 
breast cancer in a woman is that she 
does her self breast exams each 
month, is seen by ha doctor once a 
year, and have screening 
mammograms to assure that there 
are no signs of breast cancer. If 
there are questions concerning any 
of these aspects, feel free to call 
you doctor or health care provider 
for fiirtha' infomadon. 



ALPHA OMEGA Services 

Electrical Air Conditioning 
Plumbing Heating 

Painting Minor Carpentry 
Floor Drywall 

486-7771 
498-3529 

AQ Your Home's Handyman kQ, 



PePtol 



EdithJ. Cohen, M.D, 



tolht De^Mi CMeMcd ^roup. 
^md. CertijUd: Internal Medicine 

Now Accepting New Patients 

1270 Mmond ^^^ RoM, Suite 110 

VlrglrMB^ch,\A2345S 

tt04) 464-6944 



Upcoming 
Events 



Clubs 



I^. G. William Wtutehurst, po- 
litical analyst and retired U.S. 
Congressman, will be the guest 
speaker for the Francis Land 
Cbspm Daughter of the Americai 
Revolution cm Hiursday, Dec. 28 at 
10 a.m. at tiK! Francis Land House 
and Gardens, 3131 Virginia Beach 
Blvd. 

Whitehurst will speak on "Our 
Revolutionary Anc^stOTS Took a 
Stand." TTie Bayside DAR Good 
Citizen, Erin D. Smith, Salem 
DAR Good Citizen, Msmuel Mojica 
Jr., and the Tallwood DAR Good 
Citizen, Brian Harris, will be pre- 
sented the certificate and pin by the 
chapter regent, Mrs. John Schmidt 

Refreshments will be ^^ed be- 
fore the meeting. For information 
and reservations, call Maryanne 
Nixon at 428^277. 



Hie Tidewater Appalachian 
'Hiil Qnb wiU qwasOT a winto' 
beach hQ» at the Vii^ia Beach 
ot^anfrmt on Satnrday. Jm. 13. 
This is an easy tfar^- (x four-mile 
hike. Be prepared for cold, 
blust^ weatho-. Free and open 
to the public. For information, 
caU 4^-4376. 



Education 



"If only I vmt ricfa...If only I 
was UmoM^.' drams Uaa a dor- 
acta- in the CMsnnu musical writ- 
ten by R^ NOUs Etefnoittry muac 
teachw Angela White. "The Widi 
Eir will be {Ki^eoted in the Red 
Mill school cafeteria Dec. l9 at 
7:15 p.m. The participants are 
members of the Drama Club, the 
I^nce Dub and a combined chcmis 
of foiBth and fifth graders. 



Minic win also be played by the 
sev»tth pade BMenneditte band nd 
the dghdi grade advnced band. The 
Audents fave been priKticing aace 
mid-November for the events. Call 
Lecm Edwards at 460-7500 if you 
have questions. 



Vintinia Beach Sim, ftidav. DeccmbCT 15. 1995 S 



Tf» CarMr Develc^mient Center 
student body irill host nationally- 
known illustrator and cartoonist 
John Michael Vincent Moore for a 
{vogram in tte CDC commcms on 
Tuesday, Dec. 19 at 8:30 a.m. His 
program on "Basic Insights, 
C(MK:e|Ms of Success and Achieving 
Your Goals" is presented as part of 
CDC's Speakers Series. As he 
creates his caricatures with his 
unique style of never erasing, he 
shares his message of 
"Oppwtonity, Effwt, Go" with his 
audience 



Dec. 20 at 7 p.m. is the day to 
get diat holiday iiririt by attending 
the Holiday Band Concert at 
Independence Middle School. The 
concert features holiday music 
played by the sixth and seventh 
gia^ beginning band (their debut). 



preaeat a vaiieQr of nuac nclwling 
CiffistOM. HiB^ah and non- 
holiday. Tlie Singing Pride 
Madrid group will perform 
"Home Fot the Holi^ys," a Am 
musical. Adnunion is free. 

The Singing Pride will also be 
performing at the Kempsville 
Optimist Club meeting on 
Wednesday, Dec. 20 at 6:30 a.m., 
and anodier performance will be 
given at the Greenbrier Mall on 
Thursday. Dec. 21 at 6:30 p.m. . 



Government 



The Oceanfront Concept 
Implementation Committee, a 
Planning Commission 
Subcommittee, has rescheduled its 
Dec. 11 meeting to Tuesday, Dec. 
19 at 4 p.m., in the Planning 
Department Confwcncc Room. The 
subject of discussion will be 
"Garage Ai»rtments." 



A Winter Holiday Concert will 
be performed by the sixth, seventh 
and eighth grade chorus members of 
Laikqwr Middle School on Dec. 19 
at 7 p.m. in the school's 
auditorium. The singers will 



the Virginia Beach Municipal 
Center. Delegations and citizens 
will be heard at 2 p.m. 

Fix more information, call 426- 
5735. The agenda and supporting 
documents will be available for 
publk review in all Virginia Beach 
Public Libraries no later than die 
Friday before each meeting. 



Recreation 



The Virginia Beach's Community 
Action Resource Empowerment 
(C.A.R.E.) Committee invites all 
Virginia Beach youth to a skating 
party on Saturday. Dec. 16 form 
4:30 - 6:30 p.m. at Haygood Roller 
Skating Center located at 1036 
Ferry Plantation Rd. 

The cost is $1 per person, which 
will include refreshments. 
C.A.R.E. is a non-profit which 
works with residents to change the 
physical and social appearance of 
neighborhoods. 



and view the illuminated historical 
landmark during the holiday season. 
Visitors are requested to remain on 
Atlantic Avenue, the main road 
dmwgh Fwt Story. Visitors diould 
be prepared to show a driver's 
Ikense upon entrance to Fort Stoiy. 
Parking is available at the 
lighthouse and at the Cape Henry 
Memwial Cross site. 

For additional information, 
contact the Fort Story Public 
Affaire Office at 422-7755 or the 
Military Police at 422-7141. 



Religion 



Music for the entire family pa- 
formed by the Adult, Choir, the 
Children's Sunday school classes 
and the congregation will be pre- 
sented beginning at 7 p.m. on 
Sunday, Dec. 17 at Unity Church 
of Tidewater, 5580 Shell Rd. in 
Virginia Beach. Call 464-0772 for 
more information 



The Virginia Beach School Board 
will hold its regular meeting on 
Tuesday, Dec. 19 at 2 p.m. in the 
School Board Room of die School 
Administration Building located in 



Cape Henry lighthouse is being 
illuminated from 5 - 9 p.m. 
through New Year's Day. 

The public is invited to come out 



Need a word of cheer, an inspira- 
tional Christmas message or per- 
haps an explanation of the symbols 
of the Christmas season? Call 420- 
8711 for a daily holiday message. 



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R«der Ads In This Section Prepared By Contract Advertising, Inc © 1995 AD Ri^ts Reserved. 



Total BuUding Maintenance Limited 

If you own or manage a business, you know how difficult it is to get a reliable company to handle your janitorial and maintenance 
needs. Either they don't do a thorou^ job, or they are unreliable and don't even show up on occasion. 

This isn't tfte case with Ibtal Bullduig Maintenance Umited, located in Virginia Beach at 4335 Hialeah Drive, phone 495-7948. 
They realize that their reputation will stand or fall on their reliability and professionalism. Call them anytime and one of their service 
consultants will stop by at your business, assess your maintenance needs, and quote you a fair price. Their services are available on a 
one-time or contract basis, and commercial ana industrial accounts are handled. 

Total Building Maintenance Limited specializes in complete building maintenance including floor waxing, wall washing, 
caulking, pressure washing, waterproofing and window cleaning. Their employees are fully bonded for your protection, and all work 
is supervised to assure your complete satisfaction. The same courteous service is given to both the small and the large commercial 
businesses. Call Total Buildhig Maintenance Limited and cut the high cost of maintenance service. You'll find out why they have 
become the area's most reliable, hill-service janitorial service. 



Rollback Towing Angela Clark, owner 



For fast, reliable towing services, cau the pros at Rollback Towing, located in Virginia Beach, phone 43 1 -0405. They have many 
years of experience in this field and can handle your every towing need. Your vehicle will be taken to the destination of your choice. 

For most people, h is not often that they need to call a towing service, but when you do, rely on Rollback Towinjg for prompt and 
courteous service. They wiU be there for you seven days a week, and may be reached by calling 431 -0405. They specialize in local and 
long distance damage-free towing for commercial or private towing services. TTiese ejqjcrts have all the necessary equipment to 
perform any wrecker operation needed. 

It's nice to know that the trucks and personnel at Rollback Ibwing are available when you need them the most. For professional 
damage-free towing service and competitive prices, RoUMckTowiiw is the name to remember. Clip this reader ad and put it in your 
wallet for the next time you need the services of a competmt and refiable towing service. 

Hampton Roads Mail Service, Inc. Gary Martin, President 

One of trie most time consuming jobs faced in any business is the weekly or monthly billing and mailing services. It's essential 
that the office staff prepare the billing to ensure accuracy, but the folding, envelope insertion, labeling, postage application and sortine 
can take up to three days. The time spent is unprofitable and costly to the business. TTie services oneiedDy Hampton Roads Mm 
Sofvice haw been of great assistance to businesses that routinely send out large amounts of mail. 

Hampton Roads Mail Scrvire off^ers complete mailing services to all types of businesses. TTiey can pick up your billings and then 
fold, insert, label, meter presort, and deliver them to the post office at a very reasonable fee. Tbeir services are ma available for direct 
mail campaigns. This state-of-the-art approach to office needs can accommodate any business, from hospitals, medical office, 
telemarketers and the cable company to the small business owner. Think of the time, money and labor they can save your office 
personnel on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. 

Hampton Roads MaU Service invites you to call them at 499-0388 for mire information, or visit their location in Virginia Beach 
at 420 Investors Place, Suite 102, near Mount Trashmore. Hampton Roacb Mai Service is the time saving source for businesses on the 
grow! Hampton Roads Mail Savke thmb their customers for their continued patronise aid hopes they'll all have a merry Christmas 
and happi' New Year 

The Beach Painter Joseph e. mggs, owner 

For a professional painting service, regardless of the size of the job, the company to call in this area is The Beach Painter, 
Committed to excellence in serving Tidewater, they are located in Virginia Beach, phone 498-9750. Give them a call for information 
on any residential, commercial or industrial job Contact them anytime and let one of their uained estimators come out to your home 
or business to discuss your painting needs. They carefully analyze each job before the first stroke of the brush and provide prompt, 
free estimates. The Beach Painter specializes in brush, spray arid roller, and handles interior and exterior applications. They are afeo 
well known for creating beautiftil, yet functional faux finishes and designs that reflect your personality and lifest^e. 

With different techniques, such as sponge and rag painting, these artisans can simulate finishes as marble, granite, wood grain, 
tortoise shell or anything your heart desires. These applications may be utilized on ceilings, floors and even furniture. The Beach 
Painter can create wall designs to accentuate the colors and style of your other room fiimisnings by taking your desired pattern and 
colors and creating your designs to your specifications, which provides more vibrancy and durability than wallpaper 

The designers at The Beach l^inter have an outstanding reputation for beautinil interiors they created for homes and offices 
throughout the Tidewater area. If quality, price and supervision are important to you, caD The Beach Muter. Bring in this reader ad 
and r&xive 10% offany job after estimate. 

BW Garrett General Contractors Bwcanett. owner 

BW Garrett General Contractors, phone 4M-7577, is a professional confractor that applies economical and practical design- 
building concepts to both residential and commercial properties. From initial design planrung through complete construction. Sis 
building specialist is responsible for all phases of your project with the total responsibiUty in their competent hands, your building or 
remodeling job can be realized in a minimum amount of time and for the lowest price possible. TTieir experienced supervisors and 
craftsmen get the job done with quality and efficiency. Whether it be a remodeling job, addition or major or minor sttuctural repairs, 
they offer a complete building service. 

They specialia in aU types of siding, roofltig, tcfiaceimni windows, room additions, bathroom and kitchen remodeling, and all 

r of alterations. They make a point of only hiring weD-qualified personnel to assist them, and you can Ik assured of a professional 
arried out with high quality materials and completed in the shortest time possible. 

"When you have a job that calls for a building specialist, call these professionals first. They will give personalized attention to your 
project Remember, if it's worth having it done— it's worth having it done right. Call the professionals at BW GarrM General 
Contr»:tors and let them get started on beautiJying your home today. MGwntt General Contractars ttdces this opportunity to ^umk 
their many customers for contributing to their success and wish^ them all a happy hdidt^' sea^m and a wonderful New Kaw: 

MlCaSlta Best Mexican Food in rulewater 

While you're out shopping this holiday season and need to rdax, stop and enjoy the splendor and exciten^nt of OW Mexico when 
you dine at Mi Casita, located in Virginia Beach at 3600 Bonney Ro^, ptrane 463-3819. Ili^ feahire ddkious, Uuly auttentic Mexican 
imA and are open daily for lunch and ditmer. 

Their menu features all of your old favorites, sudi as t^^, encfaUmias, burritos, guacamole, and ^janish rice. They have 
captured the true tanw flavor of Mexico by using exact spices and inaedients to prepare m of their dishes completely hum scratch. 
For diose who prefer meir food tempered for the American taste, NU Cnkaabo features a tantaliang menu of American dishes and 
te b«t margaritas in town. They offer free chips and salsa with lunch cm- dinner and margaritas at $2.00 each, Monday throu^ 
Thursday. 

Re^nts of this area no longer have to drive long distances to get quality Mexican food— you can find it ri^t here in Viipiia 
Beach. Whatever you ckwse, you are sure to have one of the most delicious meals you have ever eaten. Stop in soon Monday through 
Friday from 1 1:30 a.m. to 2:30'p.m. for lunch or at 5:00 p.m. for dinner. They are open Saturday from noon to 10:00 pm., and Sundw 
from noon to 9KX) pm. Also, enjoy their hearty Sunday brunch buffet, arKl all of their dishes are amM:ki for take-out. Remember m 
Cadtt for a truly enioyable Mexican experieiice. Mm in Ms reader ad and hv^ orve lunch or dinner at the remlar price tmdgtt^ 
sewrui iUnnerat halfpritx on Momkiy throi^ Thursday only. Season'^ ff^^tings anl happy New Year from Mi umta. 

Vil^inia Bedrooms Kevin PeppenOwner/R)und» 

Whai TOu're shopping for a bed, bedding or himiture, stop in at a shop that specializes in tiKse items. Located in^Ufpnia Beach 
at 2362 Yimnia Beach Boulevard, phone 463-9121; in Oiesapeake at 237 SouUi Battlefiekl Boutevard, phone 482-8019; and in 
i^rfolk in the lanaf ^imin| Center, phone 46 1 -%36; V1i|^ BeifatiMW is this ansa's foretwM s^ sl^ 
you need for a comfortable ni^t's sleq). Ifipu're fiimishing or remodeiii^ a bolroom, aop in here kx d« nwst important j^ce m 
himiture— the bed! ' 

At Vii|^ Bafaooms, youH find a larp selwtwn of Sea^ Pmtmiepedk and Smmonj agoMty Rm mattreaes ukI box 
sprii^s which are among the b^t sding on dK marieet today, 'This is the only s^p sp«:Mlty ikep ta d« Tl^water am that 
carries both the No. 1 andNo.2best mattr^^ in d«workl.AiKl, of course, you ]lfinabed^—headbo«ikandframe$,btasb«k, 
bunk beds and day beds in sinrie, douWe, queen and king me&. One (rf die newest and most vosat^ iiteas in eontemporary 
home fumtshinp is also one of the old«l— the hiton! Stop by Vit^BbL Betfaoonis to see a comptete line of hiton mattresss, 
frames and accessories. The management here keeps on display a wonderftil selation of drears, night stands and entertain- 
ment centers to fit in with the dwor you've chosen tor your bedroom. The b«b aM here are ctotm far tteir durabttity, quality 
materials and attractive desip. In acWition, VlifWa Bedroom oBbs she« sets, tfanlMs, bedum^ Mam and cwiitorten in 
bc'autihil rolors and patterns. 

SIrw ^ spend rixHJt 1 /3 of your Ufc in bed, it wwW make saise to iteqj « a«i(Ml^ as you (»i on • bed tfiat wMi fflK. R)r 
comfort and atUKtiw d«gn in b«b «m1 beikiii^ dnv «i soon to Vh^M r " 



Scuba diving can indxxluce you to the fascinating underwater worid of adventure and excitement. All divers, from the utmost 
e)q)erienced to the novice, insist on quality equipment and supplies. Aqua Safaris, located in Virginia Beach at 4724 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard (across from Office Max), phone 473-0847, is your local headquarters for diving lessons, as well as name brand equip- 
ment and supplies, such as Sea Quest, Sherwood. Diveskins and IBL As one of the area's largest dive shops, they can be relied on for 
all types of diving gear at unbeatable prices. All gear packages are 25% off throughout the month of December and clearance sales 
are ahvays featured. 

Under new management, this dive center is establishing a fine reputation in the community for their foil line of quality diving 
merchandise, good service and professional scuba instruction bv certined instructors. They aim for blue ribbon customer service to 
all of their patrons. Call today to inquire about their lessons— purchase one lesson, receive one for half price. The staff at Aqua Safaris 
has frill knowledge of the diving business and all are divers tliemselves. They'll be able to aid you in the selection of the proper supplies 
and equipment that you will need on that special underwater expedition. Gift certificates are available and be sure to inquire about 
their scuba introduction. 

For the finest in diving equipment and supplies, stop by Aqua Safaris. You will be pleased with their professional service and 
quality gear. 

KeglnOS QiuckGoumems& Greg Mazarakis, Owners 

It seems as though there are Italian restaurants of every size, price range and specialty in each community. To be exceptional and 
to stand out from all the rest it must have something really special going for it, Regmo's has simply the best food and service which is 
served in a relaxed and warm family aUnosphere. 

The owners of this fine establishment pamper their patrons with TLC and exceptional old-style Italian cuisine. Their menu is 
more than complete, fix)m homemade pastas, fresh clam sauces, fresh cut veal to garden fresh salads, gourmet pizzas and tantalizing 
daily specials sure to please the entire family. You can always count on hardy portions, modest prices and mouthwatering homestyle 
Italian food when you dine at Regino's. If you still have a bit of room in your tununy, don't miss out on their homemade Italian desserts. 
They are truly a wonderful finish to a great meal. 

Rttino's is located in Vii^a Beach at 509 Hilltop Plaza, phone 491-1613, and in Norfolk in Wards Comer at 1 14 East Little Creek 
Road, phone 588-8012. Treat yourself and your family and stop by today. You haven't tasted the finest Italian cooking in this area until 
you've eaten at Repw's. At this time, Regino's thanks their many loyal patrons for contributing to their success and wislm them all a 
merry Christmas (wda happy NewYear 

]USt Rite Carpet Robert Welnschenk, owner 

Nothing is as comfortable or impressive as a truly clean home or office. If your carpets, draperies and frirniture haven't been 
cleaned widun the past sk months, uiey've accumulated surface discoloring, smudges and spots, f^l-aid stains, gum as well as 
deeply embedded dirt and ^t a vacuum can never reach. Just Rite Carpet offers you a complete cleaning service for your carpets and 
upholstered himiuire that is second to none. Servicing the entire Tidewater area as well as a 100 mile radius surrounding the 
Richmond area, phone 497-6210. 

Cleaning prolongs the life of fibers, and the experts at lust Rite Carpet will analyze your cleaning needs to assure you of a job 
guaranteed to improve the appearance of your home or business. Your carpet and upholstery will look and smell like new. Their special 
cleaning process raises the caipet pile for that "never walked on" look, and brings out its sparkling color tones. 

When you call these professionals, you don't have to worry about shrinkage, color running or walldng on wet carpet, lust 
Rite Carpet will give your carpet and upholstery the same consideration and care you did when you first picked it out. For tliis 
holiday season, be sure and have your carpet and upholstery revitalized— it will not only impress you, but also your friends and 
family. They are experts in repairing and installation of carpets for residential and commercial buildings. 24-hour water extrac- 
tion is also a specialty. 

Municipal Security Services, Inc. 

Confidently Serving The Entire USA 

ft seems that crime continues to rise every day in this country. From small towns to busy cities, criminal activity is growing at a 
staggering pace. Your only defense against becoming a victim of crime is to protect yourself. Businesses large and small depend on 
Munkipai Security Services, located in Virginia Beach at 1446 Kempsville Road, Suite 205, phone 467-5902, 1-800-2200-SPY, or FAX 
(804) 467-9^ for all of their security needs. Office buildings, constnjction sites, retail stores, hotels, apartments, auto dealerships, 
warehouses, shopping centers and more know they can rely on their outstanding service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 

Municipal Security Services' certified security officers are available uniformed or plain clothed, armed or unarmed— whichever 
is more effective. These experts specialize in the protection of all industrial, commercial and institutional buildings, and also offer 
mobile pattol. All guards are radio-equipped and tied into a central dispatch for fast, comprehensive service. 

Don't be caii^t off guard. Let these security specialists handle all of your {ffotection needs. Their many years of experience 
backed by hard-woridng officers guarantee the most effective security service around. Put Municipal Security Service on the job 
today ana sleep weU tonight by knowing your property will be safe and sound tomorrow! 



About Face Peter MarouUs, Owner/Stylist 



A sfrong psychofo^cal link exists between lookingyour best and feeling confident about yourself. About Face, located in Norfolk 
at 2200 Colonial Avenue, phone 624-3500, offers complete salon services to pamper your body and spirit. This exciting salon offers 
the men and women of the area a hill line of hair, skin, and nail services to make you feel and look great. 

The stylists at About Face can help you find the perfect hair style to complement your hair's natural characteristics and the shape 
of your face. They specialize in precision cutting, full wave and body pernianents, spiral perms, coloring, highli^ting, French braiding 
and the latest in hairstyling. While you are there, you can pamper yourself with a skin analysis from their skin care line Glycolique 
which are glycolic acid-ba^ products, or to pamper your hands and feet uy one of their glycolic add peels. Your skin will feel revital- 
ized and healthy after their professional tteattnent. Make-up consultation, elecuolysis and beard nimming services are also available. 
End your visit at About Face with a professional manicure and pedicure, or perhaps a French manicure is what you need for the final 
touch. Tliey cany nail tiques products for your convenience as well as Aveda, Bwlage and Sdxistian products to protect your hair ftom 
drying and damage. 

There is nothing quite as relaxing as a visit t6 About Face. Call 624-3500 today for an appoinunent and take that step to a more 
beautiftil you. For a complete fiiU-service salon, visit About Face. They are a ftm, upscale salon providing quality service n a comfort- 
able yet idaxed atmosphere. 



Mirman & Hicks Ltd. 



Louis Mirman, EA & Robert L Hicks, EA, Owners/Accountants 

Successful business owners and large corporations in our financially motivated society continue to look for way^ to conserve 
their hard-earned dollars w^ierever they can. Often, the accounting firm they employ is their lai^t asset. A professional accounting 
firm must be many thinp to its clientele— a management and financial ad\1sor, a business consultant, a financial counsekir, and a 
tax and pensfon frfanr»r— in addition to providing the Uaditional accoimting and tax services. 

With 50 yrars of experience in the accounting field, die professionals at Muman & Hicks, located in Viipnia Beach at 4968 Eucbd 
Road, phone 4^9609, have proven dieir ability to do a thorough job, and are liighly respected throughout the area. I/iuis Mirman 
and Robert L Hicks are accredited by the Accieditation Council for Accounting and Taxation and both served as President of the 
Accoimting Society of \%ginia. Mr. Mirman has been President of the National Society of Public Accoimtants as well as on the 
Commissioner Advisory Group of the IRS. Both Mr. Mirman and Mr. Hicks specialize in representing clients before the IRS. Through 
their continuing education in this rapidly chanpng field and modem computer technology, Mirman & Hicks is able to provide just 
the right combination of ronsulting services and accounting skills to small business^. Their services are very reasonable, and most 
importandy, pei^onalized for each client's needs. 

As ptrfessfonals serving professionals, Mirman & Hicks invites you to contact thefr office for a consultation. Let them put their 
years of experence aiKl trainb^ to work for you! 



Copico Executive Copy Center 



Ridiaid B^iKlry & Virginia Plelss, New Owners 

'Hie printing omipany ymi choose for your business may be one of the most important dedsiom you can niak& Ibu are misting 
dmato {xtwick you vmi |xgAK:ts ami s^ces that will have a direct reflection on your product or organization. Making a good 
immeatm m d« btsuiess of Co|xk» Exnmdve Cq^ Center. They offer complete services from computer desipiing and desktop 
pushing to printii^ kU^ and finidiiiw. Whether you're looking for one-color or hill-color printing, you can count on them to 
provide ttw best quality and so^we avaikdiK. 

lliB OHiuimd^ {xintB^ axttpmy can be relied upon to handle logo and graphic designs, labels, ad slicks, NCR forms, product 
sIk^ md arniual rmmts m wdl as die necessary items your business ne^ in its day to day operation-business cards, forms, 
envefopes ar^l letterhead. Youtl apptedate their expertise for scanning and graphic work, for holiday and wedding invitations, 
brochures, calendars, note pads, mapzines as vwU as many other items. Cqrico Eifficuthv Cop^ Caiter believes that no job Ls ever 
too laipe or too snalL ff you're kxAing for expert advice oh your next project, CofNCO QEeaitivc Copy Center will be happv to lend 
I^AH»4[|Kti(»s to he^ ymv m^ reach its fuH potential. Businesses in the area are t^ang »]^t^ of ^^ 
ikkmv Msnex, a cmvei^me wwii^ bwm^es to stay ptoductive without intoruptitxis. 

WlMevcr y«ir printiiw r^ick, wu c%i oi^uton Co|^ Eiocudve G^Coiter, bcate^ 
in die hieiirtOMm aq^jing Omt« plwie 671-8(fe7 or FAX (804) 671 -8»7. T^ 
pn^ aid betts teci^tion. 



N*- 



im-^i^^^^-^^m^mmm'mmmmnmmmf^mmm^^mmmi^i^ 



W^ 



6 Virginia Batch Sun. Riday. DecembCT 15. 1995 



Education 




students coirect socks ior 
the homeless this season 



Parents and student at Linkhom 
Park Elementary school are 
decorating the school Christmas 
tree with very different ornaments 
this year. 

Instead of students making 
decorations, socks for the 
homeless are being requested as 
tree decorations. Students are 
being asked to donate a pair of 
new socks, which will be given to 



warm the feet of the homeless 
and others less fortunate in the 
community. 

Anyone in the community who 
is interested in contributing to the 
"Socks for the Homeless" tree 
may drop off the socks at the 
school office during regular 
school hours, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m., or 
call the school (437-4895). 



Beach World Learning Center 
gets national accreditation 



Children's World Learning 
Centers recently announced that 
the center located at 3278 
Holland Rd. in Virginia Beach 
has earned a national 
accreditation by the National 
Academy of Early Childhood 
Programs. 

The academy, which is a 
division of the National 
Association for the Education of 
Young Children (NAEYC), 
administers the nationally 
recognized accreditation system 
for preschools, child care centers 
and school-age programs which 
recognized those early childhood 
programs that meet national 
standards of quality. 

"Accreditation is a voluntary 
program for child care centers, 
which can only be accomplished 
by many hours of hard work from 
a dedicated suff," said Debbie 
Crelly, district manager for 
Children's World. "Although the 
accreditation process is a very 
time intensive and expensive 
undertaking, Children's Worid has 
made a commitment to having 
every one of our centers across 
the country accredited by 
NAEYC." 

To earn NAEYC Accreditation 
the center, which serves children 
ranging from 2 through 12 years of 
age, had to meet the highest 



standards for quality on more than 
150 criteria. 

Hiese include a well qualified 
and trained staff; meeting 
requirements of classroom 
environment and developmentally 
appropriate leaning programs, 
such as having excellent staff-to- 
child ratios; meeting stringent 
health and safety standards; and 
providing opportunities for 
parental involvement, among 
many others. These nationally 
established standards were 
developed by the academy over a 
three-year period with input from 
approximately 200 educators and 
administrators throughout the 
country. 

NAEYC is the premier 
professionally-sponsored |»'0gram 
in the country to apply standards 
of quality to early childhood 
education. Achievement of 
NAEYC Accreditation is a three- 
step process the center's 
personnel and parents must first 
begin the process by conducting a 
self-study to determine how well 
*the center's program meets the 
Academy's criteria. The center 
makes needed improvements, 
based on its self-study, and 
reports the compliance with the 
accreditation criteria to the 
academy. 




Youngsters experience Colonial life 



CowwyPfiow 



Doesn't it taste good? 

Chloe Careless, left, lets her lab partner Sommer Moone know without 
words that her taste buds, which register sour, are working properly. 
NIkki Overstreet, observing from a distance, finds this part of their 
science lab most entertaining. These budding scientists are eighth 
graders at Cape Henry Collegiate School. 



Basketball mania! °'~"" 

Unkhorn Park Elementary School second gradet^ in the classes of 
tead«r Martha \A1lson and Franas S^ew w&e rKWitly treated to vWs 
t^ Old DwTMnl(Mi Monarch ba^^ttirt pliers CkMI Hodge »Kt Shnxlra 
Deberry. Botti stressed tfie importan(X of doing well In school. The 
stixtents had ttw (^>poiM^ to ask qtjestons wti warn ^xwt the iNes of 
twc role models. Lucky ^uctents Attem Johnson, Chrtsy Mirdcn and 
Storm Lacy e^/er\ got to po% k^ a i^to^^ «^ Deb^ry. 



By MARGARET WINDLEY 
Sun Correspondent 

Creating Native American 
necklaces and comhusk dolls. 
Tracing silhouettes. Making 
candles and butter. Whittling. 
Those were just some of the 
ways that Colonial youngstera 
entertained themselves 200 or 
300 years ago. 

And those are some of the 
ways that modern Virginia 
Beach students at Ocean Lakes 
Elementary School ended up 
studying Colonial Virginia. 

"Every class has studied the 
Colonial period, and they went 
on a field trip and visited 
Jamestown and Yorktown," said 
Honey McClcndon, the school's 
public relations liaison. 

"During their classes they de- 
cided just to wrap evo-ything up 
that each teacher would do 
something from that time pe- 
riod. JTomorrow the kids from 
the omer classes in the school 
will just take a look at every- 
thing they were doing." 

Students Leeza Dos Santos 
and Tabitha Wade were amixig 
those students who had l)een 
involved in the activities and 
had studied together on one pro- 
ject, a retrospect of the life of 
Capt. John Smith, and they 
were fascinated by the differ- 
ences between Smith's life in 
the books and the Disney 
movie. 

"He never married Pocahon- 
tas, but Pocahontas saved 
Smith's life," Dos Santos said. 

"When he was coming to 
Virginia, he sailed on the Dis- 
covery," Wade added. 

"He was captain of the Dis- 
covery," emphasized Dos San- 
tos. 

"He made friends with the In- 
dians. He taught the settlers 
how to clear land and water and 
how to farm. He had a wife 
named Kerryc. It's useful in- 




Phow by lytafd"* winder 



DIPP1N6 CANDIES. ColMtal mcB antf woima CMMiit Jitt flip a 
switch and get il^; tliey tut u irnkt candle after cairfle, at 
these Octam Lakes Elementsfy stadento fearacdl last week. 



formation when we get in col- 
lege or in high school we might 
have to study about it." 

Dos Santos considered deeply 
and then decided that her fa- 
vorite project was doing the sil- 
houettes. 

"I like tracing, myself," she 
said. "I like tracing my part- 
ner." 

She had enjoyed learning 
about the Colonial times. 

"I would like to have lived 
then because it's fun making all 
the stuff that they had and then 
all the things that they had to 
do. They didn't have any elec- 
tricity, and they got their light 
from candles. They didn't have 
any cameras or radios, so they 
had to do the silhouettes, and 
when they got bored they could 
make the com husk dolls. 

"After the corn grew they 
could make the corn husk dolls. 
To make the butter a family of 
kids about our age had to stir 
for hours and hours." 

Wade enjoyed the buttermak- 
ing. 

"Because you got to shake 




AU DONE! After mach dlpplac 
a flalsbed candle! New Jast 
strike a match and It's rea^ ta 
ban! 

the whipped cream and make 
the butter!" 

But she was just as glad that 
she did not have to live in those 
long-gone days "because they 
didn't have no electricity or 
some of the things that we have 
nowadays. If their parents 
didn't have enough money to go 
to the store and buy them a 
doll, they would have to make 
itoutofcomhusks." 



All Va. Beach 
schools meet 
SACS continuing 
requirement 



All elonaitmy, middle and hi^ 
schools in Virginia Beach once 
again met all requiremenu f(» 
continuing accreditation by the 
Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools (SACS). 

While most seccmdary schools in 
Hampton Roads are acoedited bf 
SACS, Virginia Beach is uniqiie 
among school systems in South 
Hampton Roads because its 
elementary schools have also been 
accredited by SACS f(H^ tt» last % 
years. 

In order to maintain accreditation, 
schools mast pay dues to the 
organization, meet specific 
standards and develop and thra 
implement a plan fm continuous 
imjHovemoit 

Most Virginia Beach schools 
monitor their imivovement through 
School Roiewal. a process based on 
research on effective schools. In 
this improvement model, a review 
team validates that certain 
established standards are met at the 
end of each five-year cycle. Schods 
are expected to demonstrate 
improvement in five specific areas: 
school climate, planning, staff 
development, curriculum and 
instruction and communications. 
Standards used to measure a 
school's performance include chos 
size, planning time for teachns sad 
staffing ratios. 

Accreditation is a seal of aiqxoval 
for a school and indicated that the 
education its students receive is 
compar^le to other high-acheivuig 
schools throughout the r^ion. 
Having accredited schools also 
helps the city's marketability when 
new businesses show interest in 
moving to Virginia Beach. 

The most recently accredited 
school in Virginia Beach is Kemps 
Landing Magnet School, which 
opened in September as an 
accredited school. 



Academic 
Honors 



Thirteen seems to be the lucky 
number at Malibu Elementary for 
two of its teachers. After 
successfully teaching for 13 
years, Mark Carmack, physical 
education specialist, was honored 
for Teacher Teacher of the Year, 
and Susan Danchise, 
kindergarten teacher, was honored 
for Reading Teacher of the Year. 



Several Longwood College 
students from Virginia Beach 
have been selected to the col- 
lege's Honors I^ogram. 

They are: Andrea Johnson 
(Bayside), Emma Pehovaz-Diaz 
(Frank W. Cox), Sean Myers 
and Stephanie Reitz (Salem), 
Stacie Thomas (Tallwood) and 
Douglas Watt (Green Run). 

Selection to the honors program 
is based on high school grade- 
point average and SAT scores. 
Those in the program must 
maintain a 3.25 GPA and take at 
least eight honors courses. 



Commonwealth 
College Beach 
campus slates 
registration 



Commonwealth College is now 
holding registration for winter 
quarter classes at the Virginia 
Beach Campus. Classes begin 
Jan. 8. Commonwealth College 
offers associate degree programs 
in Accounting, medical Assisting, 
Legal Assisting, Microcomputer 
Information Management, 
Business Arrangement, Office 
Management and Hotel and 
Restaurant Management. An 
associate degree may be earned 
in less than two years. 

Regular registration times are 9 
a.m. - 8 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday; 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Friday; 
and 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday. 
Registration for Children's 
College, the on-site child care 
center available to students, will 
be held at the same time. 

For more information, call the 
campus at 499-7900. The toll-free 
number is 1-^)0-735-2421. 




Top teacher! 



OomwrPlMM 



Joan Pluta, right, a Spedal Education teacher at Unkhorn Park Elemen- 
tary, was voted by the staff as their school's Teacher of the Year for 
1996. Pluta. a 25-year veteran of the classroom, began teaching spe- 
cial and regular education classes in Pennsylvania. Afto" completing a 
master's degree In early childhood education In Loulsvllle, Ky., she 
moved to Virgnia Beach and has taught at Unkhorn Mc for four years. 
Principal Carroll Monger presented Pluta with a bouquet of roses and 
thanked her for her devotion to students. Pluta stated that she "believes 
that all children should be provided the opportunity to learn lo thefr po* 
tentt^. llTe sdiool's responsibility is to address each child's teaming style 
and to provkle teaming experiences which promote tfiat teaming s^e, 
sua%ss and self-esteem." 



Congratulations to Pawprints 
newspaper staff for 1995-1996 at 
Princess Anne Middle School: 
Nicole Cahill, Nikki Curtis, 
Michelle Gillespie, Michael 
Lewis, Angela McCall, Jennifer 
Rimbey, Charlenne Roaquin, 
Josh Swindell, Amanda Sysart, 
Amanda VanDreisen, Erica 
Van Riper and Josh Viles. 



Kristen Leagan of Virginia 
Be^h is serving as an umtergr^uate 
research assistmit at the Univusity 
of North Carolina at Grronsboro 
during the 1995-96 academic year. 
Leagan, a junior media studies 
major, is the dmighter of Gay and 
Marisu Leagan of Virginia Beach. 

She is working with Dr. John 
Jellicorse in the Department of 
Broadcasung^inema and Tlieater. 
She is prejwring a bibliography f« 
a critical studies book that 
Jellicor^ is writing abut non- 
fiction media. In addition to 
collecting sources, Leagan has 
developed a database of ih. 
information. 

The assistantships give 
undergraduate students the 
opportunity lo work with faculty 
members on research projects. 




D.4./?.£ to be different "^ 

The WpiUa Beach Police Departnwit reantty hosted law enfwt^ment offloers fcom thnM^ioU the Untod 
States airing a Dr\^ Abuse Resist«ice Education (DAR.E.) training pro^^m held imt. R^xts^iMves vMed 
Sfawbrk^ Etement»y Sdiool yid presented a te^Ni to grades om thrm^ four. 



Get ready for a country Christmas 



itIII«I»ii'K^ 



Contlnutd From Ptgt i 

loid at Back Biy Pott Office, 
Cortii Aaiell is itockinc q> on 

Curad hama are another great 
Vi^Kinia CteiiimM tradUon. and 
Ansell sells both the pepper- 
cotted and sogar-coated hams at 
his Bade Bay grocery. 

Ansell also sells tiokeys. but in 
the past couple of years he's no- 
ticed a trend toward i^hne rib for 
the winter holidays. 

"I have quite few pec^le com- 
ing in to i»iy it for ChriAmas and 
New Year's," he said. "It doesn't 
sell weU during the summo' be- 
caioe people (fam't like to bake in 
h(M weadier." 

If you a taste for wild game, 
you might be able u> catch your 
own Christmas dinner in the 
southnn Virginia Beach marshes 
where ducks are plentiftil this 
time of yew. 

Jim Clark, a Back Bay hunting 
and fishing guide, said that these 
ducla can be smoked or roasted 
in die oven "until the meat falls 
off of the bone. Then make a 
gravy and code rice (»- potatoes to 
go widi it and itll just melt in you 
moudi." 

Wild plants, meanwhile, are 
great for decorating, according to 
native plant expert Vickie Shufer. 
The partridge berry, a ground 
cov» which ^ws abundantly in 



wood«i areas, "can be 'used to 
dMorate the base of candles," 
Shufer nid. 

The ympoa, a relative of the 
Amertem htdly, also imdoMs red 
benies, while wax myrtle leaves 
or berries, the southern water- 
shed's alternative to bayberry, 
provide a iMting frapmce when 
they an bdted in wata. 

Heib gantadng is uiother tnMU- 
tion Uiat's been revived latdy. 
Unda Xraakis, who owns Linda's 
Oanfen, an herb ferm on Camp- 
bell's Landing Road, says Uiat 
many culinary hvN can be used 
f(a- baking Christinas goodies. 

She often diis rec^ for sugar 
cookies widi lemon qjices, which 
can be frozen for several we^ 
before they are iced; 

Linda's 3-LcmoD Sugar 
CooUea 

3/4 Slick butter 
1 cup sugar 
4 eggs 
1 tsp. vmilla 

1 tsp. lemon rind, grated until it's 
very fine 

112 tsp. lemon verbena 
112 tsp. lemon balm 

2 7/2 ci^ flour 

1 tsp. baking powder 
112 tsp. salt 

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 
Add the butter, sugar, eggs, 



Firefighters give speclai 
hoiiday gift to community 



D Continued From Page 1 

no extra cost. They'll call us and 
the fire station, from whatever 
station is in dwir neighborluMM, 
will drive out in the truck and put 
it up for them. Of course, all the 
smoke detectors are paid for 
through donations." 

In addition, Uiere is a Toys For 
Tots collection box at die fire sta- 
tion, 

"So if anyone wants to bring in 
a new or slightiy-used toy, we'll 
have a box here diey can drop off 
a toy," said Keane, who added 
tiiat die toys will go to children 
th roMg iia ai the H ampton-^oads 



tn roi i g iia ai ( 



Chris Ferguson, a Kempsville 
Heights resident, brought his 
daughters to the fire station fw a 
little while last weekend. While 
one ^ on Santa Claus' lap and 
watched Wags, another watched 
the trains chug around the tracks. 

"A Mend of oun is in Uie train 
club," said Ferguson. "We came 
down io see Uie trains and the 
truck and Uiey got to see the 
firestation and Uie fire trucks, and 
they learn about fire safety. 

"It's good to get their attention 
and give dwm safety messages." 

Just a few feet away from die 
Fogusons stood Trent Martin and 
his four-year-old son. Will. 

"He likes trains and they get! 
this fire education school," said 
Martin, nodding ai Will, who was 



clearly mesmerized by the trains. 
They're interested in fire tucks, 
fire education and fire prevention 
and all diat. 

"It's peat," Martin added. "I 
don't think I've seen a train dis- 
play tills big uiywhere." 

John Miller, a train club mem- 
ber who lives in York County, 
looks forward to helping set up 
and run train displays like these. 
Socializing is one of his favorite 
parts of die setup at die fire sta- 
tion. 

"The fact tiiat it gives club 
members an q>portunity to get to- 
gether," Miller said, "lliis time of 
year, a |ot of folks equate trains 
witii tiie Christmas season and 
having trains go around die trees 
at home. 

"It certainly must be positive 
for tiie Virginia Beach Fire De- 
IMUttnent to get die small children 
in here to visit and give Uiem 
some fire safety infcmnation. 

"They're tying an education 
thing in witii a fun tiling. The two 
go hand in glove. 

"All kids ^ts a kick out of diis 
— die 6-year-old kids'and die 80- 
year-old kids, too. It's a lot of fim. 
It gives you a chance to play widi 
your trains." 

Tlu trains will be on display at 
the fire station, located at 5656 
Providence Rd. through Dec. 16 
from 6-9 p.m. For more i/rforma- 
tion, call the fire a^nistration of- 
fice at 427-4228. 



Condemnation issue sends 
city bacl( to drawing board 



Continued From Pago 1 



the transaction." Lilley pointed 
out. 

He added t'lat if tiiat's what 
council wanted, his department 
could do tisat, but would have to 
hired, yiivfitc attorneys. 

Li.'ey v/ained, however, tiiat 
once iu,e pit)cess gets going, Uiere 
may be unhq^y endings. 

Once die property is acquired, 
said Spore, city officials will sit 
down with Norfolk Airport 
Autiiority officials to develop a 
concq>t for die property which 
may include lami exchanges. 

Lawson said that very few 
hones are left in Burtm Station., 
"we ue tearing them down and 
removing them as fast as we 
can," he nid. 

A few of the residents who live 
in nk^ homes just don't want to 
move, Lawson said. 

Spoe smd diat if the SI patent 
requirsnmt were included in die 
legislation, it wou'd drive die 
pcteesup. 

"We will be paying lor p«»^le's 
signatares." 

Councilman Robert K, Dean 
said that he did not think 
sufficient tMdances w&t in die 
fym. fwir vrasums of die {xop<»ed 

Couieilwoman Louisa 
Strayhora, in an effort to protect 
Dm d^MS mve, aug^sted die 
B^ority or SI pmcmt sppoval. 



Councilman Louis R. Jones said 
too many problems associated 
widi tile 31 percent requirement 
since the city had already 
purc!'.a/icd [»operty frtxn some of 
the propeny owners in Burton 
Station. 

He suggested limiting the 
ccHidcmnation power to Burton 
Sution and eliminating the 51 
percent requirement that he imd 
othrr cotmcil members thought 
7'Oiild be ij\%'i U} die ptqwrty 
c<,.xrs<»hj ubtjyiy have reached 
agreemenis wiJi die city. 

Spore said diat die city is si a 
point after several years that 
some of dte pnqrerty own^s are 
not willing to ^11. He said diat 
the city would not be able to 
acquire the fjv.-perty witiiout 
condemnatiai. 

"Once you've started the 
acquisition piocess," he said, 
"it's critical that everyone is 
treated die same." if you change 
the rules, he said, it would be 
unfair U> die {miperty owners who 
have setded widi the city. 

Strayhom suggested diat tiie 
onlinance be narrowed down. 
Where earlier drafts of the 
legislative proposal could have 
been appli^ to any area in die 
state,, limiting the power to be 
used in Burtm Sution alone 
would definitely namw the 
legislation. 

The city still wwld have to 
reqoeM tihe Oei^il Anembly to 
allow it to m^ a ch«t« chuige. 



vaUlia, lemon rind, lemon verbena 
and lemon balm. Mix well with a 
mixer. Add thefow, bating powder 
and salt. Mix well to form a itiee 
ball that is slightly sticky. If it's too 
sticky, add a little flour until you 
can mix it with your hands. 

Coating the rolling pin and coun- 
ter top with flour also makes it eas- 
ier to roll oM the dough. The dough 
can be used for super shooter 
cooties or rolled out to the 114- 
inch thickness and cut with cootie 
cutters. 

Bake on an ungreased cookie 
sheet for five to eight minutes or 
until the sides start to turn brown. 



I PUBLICNOTICE 1 

Auction: 1983 CHEVROLET 
CAVALIER (6746) 

Serial Number: 1G1AD69P- 
6071(0887 

Auction Dait: DECEMBER 26, 
1995 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Nfilitary 
Hwy, Norfolk, Va 23518, 

Norfolk Motor Company re- 
serves die right to bid. 

50-2 
1+12-15 

I PUBLIC NbriCE ~1 

Auction: 1985 FORD ESCORT 
(6823) 

Serial Number: IFABP0942F- 
T126805 

Auction Date: DECEMBER 26, 
1995 

Time: 11:00 am. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy, Norfolk, Va 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company re- 
serves die right to bid. 

50-1 
1+12-15 



L 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



Auction: 1982 MAZDA GLC 
(6802) 

Serial Number: JMIGB4116- 
CO618032 

Auction Date: DECEMBER 26, 
199S Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy, Norfolk, Va 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company 
reserves die right to bid. 

50-3 
1+12-15 



C 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



" The Annual Return for die 
REDWOOD MEMORIAL 
FUND will be available for public 
inspection by any person who so 
requests during regular business 
hours beginning March 15, 1996 
uid continuing for 180 days there- 
after at the office of die Trustee, 
Crestar Bank, c/o Douglas 
Headley, 401 Duke of Gloucester 
Sd^et. Williamsburg. VA. 20005. 
The telephone number is 804-253- 
9201." 



American Heart 
Association. 

ftghmg Hurt Diutu 







11 \<Hiaic whtil \(uie;i(, 
luliN iioUiil hack on lal? 



Who Can 
Solve This 
Problem? 



Bight now, in a(sae school districts, 

third graders are learning 

how to solve this equation. 

And in some school districts, sixth 

I^d0« are learning.. 

But time are stiU boom school 

districts where seniora will 

mxm a diploma without eva- 

having to face the qt^rtion. 



Ni youf Bdiooi dlsMcta 






AMIIir AN 
riDIRATiOH 

ot nACHns 

ffOUtATttWlU 



Aucdm: 1983 OLDSMOBILB 
CyiLASS (5099) 

Serial Number I03AR47AOD- 
M558865 

Auctira Daift DECEMBER 28. 
1995 

Time: 11:00 am. at Norfolk 
Motor Company. 7000 N. Military 
Hwy. NorfbOcVa 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company 
reserves die right to bid. 

S04 
1+12-15 



^ Vh-rinkBaachSuniy^y 

widi a radius of 15.00* an aic 
distance <a 9.70 feet to Oe Mm 
irfB^inidng. 

At diat time, anyone affected 
ffl^r apptai and be heard. After 
die report of the viewns is 
recieved, at the next regular 
meetiiig (tf die aty Coradl. or as 
soon dioetftw as die manar may 
be placed on die aimda, the 



December 15. 19957 



firom die said defendant, qira die 
grounds of having lived sqwate 
and apart witiiout any coha- 
bitation and widtout any Inter- 
ruptim for a p«iod in excess of 
one year, to wit: 8 years. 

It is ORDERED duu WUUam 
Roy Pntico appev and jrotect 
(Us) interest, on or before Jm- 
uary 11, 1996, which <late is no 



undenigited will Petition dw CiQr soww dum fifty days aft« entry 
Council to vacate, close and ofddsaderofpublicaticm. 



kiHiiaMM 



1 



Auction: 1985 CHEVROLET 
CAVALIER (5044) 

Serial Number 101JE77P3P7- 
154132 

Auction Date: raCEMBER 27, 
1995 

Time: 11:00 am. at Norfolk 
Motor Compuiy, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy, Norfolk, Va. 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company 
reserves the right to bid. 



discontinue die portion of tiiat 
stiwet in die City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, described above. 
AM^CAN-OCEANIC 
COATING CORPORATION 

By; Edvrard Bourden, Of Coun- 
cil 

R. Edwards Bourdon Jr. 

SYKES, CARNES, BOURDON 
&AHERN,P.C. 

^mbndw One, The Hfdi Floor 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23462-2980 

(804)499-8971 



And it is further ORDERED 
that tills order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of gen- 
end circulation in diis City pre- 
scribed by diis court. 

November 20, 1995 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By PhyUis N. Styron 

Deputy Clerk 

48-3 
4+12-2 



i^Ml:•^I^iiw 



T:H[*i;Mir 



FOR 



PUBLid N6ti6r 



J 



450' 



VmOINU: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE 

INRE: 

Deniw Lemire 

Plaintiff(s) 

V. Roger J. Lemire. Jr. 

Defendant(s) 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION - 
CASENO.Ch95-1765 

The object of dris suit is (for): 
Plaintiff to obutin a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from the 
Defendant on die grounds of one 
year separation. 

It is ORDERED diat Roger J. 
Lemire, Jr. appear and protect his 
interest, on a before January 30, 
1996 which diOe is no sooner dian 
fifty days after entry of diis order 
of publication. 

And it is furdier ORDERED 
that diis order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in die Virginia 
Beach Sun a newspaper of 
general circulation in this City 
prescribed by diis court 

December 4, 1995 

By J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By Alisha Luidsey 

Deputy Cleric 

50-6 
4+1-5 



— I'l IM I [^ 



PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, diat 
at die meeting of die City Coun- 
cil of die City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, to be held on die 9th 
day of January, 1996, at 2:00 
p.m., at die City Hall of die City 
of Virginia Beach, at Princess 
Anne, die undersigned will peti- 
tion the Council for die appoint- 
ment of Viewers to view the 
below described portion of a 
certain street and to report to die 
City Council whether in die 
opinion of die Viewers, what, if 
any. inconvenience would result 
from tiie vacating, closing and 
discontinuance of same, die said 
portion of said street being de- 
scribed as follows: 

UNIMPROVED RIGHT OF 
WAY ADJACENT TO LOTS 7 
AND 8, BLOCK 19, PLAT OF 
SECTION "B" OF OCEAN 
PARK ALL THAT CERTAIN 
PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND 
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING 
IN THE BAYSIDB BOROUGH 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH, VIR- 
GINIA designated "UNIMPRO- 
VED R/W 1596.7 SQ. FT on diat 
plat entiUed "EXHIBIT A" 
SHOWING PART OF UNIM- 
PROVED RIGHT OF WAY OF 
DUPONT CIRCLE TO BE 
CLOSED AND EXCESS mO- 
PERTY TO BE ACQUIRED 
•OCEAN PARK.' Bayside Bor- 
ough. Virginia BMcb. Vtfginia." 
prepared by T.E.S., Inc. datCKl 
11/27/95. which parcel is more 
particularly described as begin- 
ning at a point along die nordiem 
right of way line of Dupmt Circle 
at die southeastern cmner of Lot 
7, Block 19, Plat of Section "B" 
of Ocean I^ik. and from said 
Point of Beghining. following die 
northern right of way line of an 
unimproved portion of Dupont 
Circle in a soutiiwe^erly direct- 
ion akng a curve widi a radiiu of 
400.00* an arc distance of 151.62 
feet to a pcmt al(»v die soudmn 
bounduy (tf Lot 8, Btock 19, Mat 
of Section '3" of Ocean Park; 

dienn turning aad proceedhig in 
a stwdii^Mn^ direcikm aloig a 
curve Witt a m^ (^ m.OO* «i 
arc distMM of 52.93 feet to a 
point: dieitee tivaing and pro- 
Medii^ in a nwdiMMerly d^t- 
k» itoig die soutbeti right of 
way Ihie an ^improved pcmkm of 
rhqx»t Ckcle tfong a curve widi 
a radius ei 41S.00* an arc dis- 
tence of 81.73 feet to a point; 
tiienceproceeding in a north- 
eastsly directiM alrag a nrve 
widi a ndlw trf 150.00* hi vc 
ttsnnce of 18.95 feet to a potnt; 
tiwnce proceeding in a north- 
nistttly dir«;Uon along a curve 



ADVERTISEMENT 
BIOS 

Accepting bids for 
seawall, 

9 boat slips &. ramp. Contact 
SHOW BOAT MOTEL Atiantic 
Beach, N.C. 1-919-726- 6163 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



] 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERKS OFFICE 

IN RE: Janet Osborne Risley, 
Plaintiff 

V. Stephen Cordner Risley, 
Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION ■ 
CASE NO. CH95-3736 

The object of this suit is (to) 
(for) Divorce - 1 year separation. 

It is ORDERED that Stephen 
Cordner Risley appear and protect 
his interest, on or before January 
8, 1996, which date is no sooner 
dian fifty days after entry of diis 
order of publication. 

And it is furdier ORDERED 
that this order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this City 
prescribed by this court. 

November 15. 1995 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By Alexia Lindsey, 

Deputy Clerk 

I PUBLICNOTICE ~1 

NOTICE OF SERVICE OF 
PROCESS BY PUBLICATION 
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
COUNTY OF MECKLENBURG 

IN THE DISTRICT COURT 
BEFORE THE CLERK 95-SP- 
1683 

IN THE MATTER OF THE 
ADOPTION OF IAN HUNTER 
ELLIOTT. A MINOR CHILD 
BORN TO BARBARA JEAN 
MCRAEELUOTT 

TO: MARK HAM- 
MOND/MARK HAMMOND 
AND/OR ALL PUTATIVE 
FATHERS OF IAN HUNTER EL- 

uorr 

TAKE NOTICE diat a pleading 
seeking relief against you has 
been filed in the aibove entitled 
special proceeding. The nature of 
the relief being sought is as 
follows: 

A hearing has been set before 
die Court at 10:00 a.m. on tiie 4di 
day of January, 1996, or as soon 
diereafter as counsel can be heard 
for aa ordo- pursuant to N.C.G.S. 
48-6 allowing the adoption by 
petitioners KELVIN SEBRON 
BRYANT and PATRICE LAS- 
SITER BRYANT of IAN HUN- 
TER ELLIOTT, a minor child 
bom to BARBARA JEAN MC- 
RAE ELLIOTT, to proceed 
without the consent of the 
putative fadier of die child. Said 
hearing will be held in the office 
of die Clerk of Superior Court, 
Civil Courts Building, Suite 101, 
800 E. 4tii St., Charlotte, N.C. 
28202. 

You are required to make 
defense to such pleading not later 
dian January 17di, 1996 and upon 
your failure to do so die parties 
seeking wrvice against you will 
i^ply to die Court for die relief 
sou^L 

This die 29di day of November, 
1995. 
W. David Thurman 
BUSH, THURMAN & Wilson, 
PA 
N.C. Bar No. 11117 
^1 Eatt Trttie Street 
Charlotte, North Carolina 
28202 
(704) 3774164 

49-5 
3+12-22 

I tHilLieN6ti6E I 



VIRGINU: IN THE VIROINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE 

IN RE: Vicki Yvonne Pndto 

Plaintiff(s) 

v. William Roy Pradm 

Defndan^s) 

ORD^ OF PUBLTCATION - 
CASEJW.CH95.^9 

The ob^ of dus nit is (for): 
the said plaintiff to obtain a 
divorce A Vinculo Matrimonii 



NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY 
OB THF ANNUAL, REPORT OF 

THE ARMOND AND Rn.SP^ 
CAPLANPOIINnATinM 

TAKE NOTICE, diat tiie An- 
nual Rep<»t of die above Found- 
ation for die taxable year ending 
September 30, 1995 as required 
by § 6056 of die Internal Revenue 
Code of 1954, is available for 
inspection at die principal office 
of the Foundation, 500 E. Main 
Street, Suite 1424, Norfolk. Vir- 
ginia 23510, during regular 
business hours by any citizen who 
requests it within 180 days after 
die publication of die notice of its 
availability. Requests for Inspec- 
tion should be made to tiie un- 
dersigned Principal Manager at 
die Office as above stated. 

Signed by ARMOND R. 
CAPLAN 

Date: 11/29/95 

49-2 

1+12-8 

I PUBLICNOTICE I 



NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY 
OF THE ANNUAL REPORT OF 
THE STRPHEN R. TAPT.AN 

roUNPATON 

TAKE NOTICE, that die An- 
nual Report of die above Foun- 
dation for die taxable year ending 
September 30, 1995, as required 
by § 6056 of die Internal Revenue 
Code of 1954, is available for 
inspection at die princlml office 
of die Foundation, 4505 Kelly 
Court, Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23462, during regular business 
hours by any citizen who request 
it widiin 180 days after the pub- 
lication of the notice of its 
availability. Requests for inspec- 
tion should be made to the un- 
dersigned Principal Manager at 
die office as above stated. 

Signed by: STEPHEN R. 
CAPLAN 

Date: 11/29/95 

49-3 
1+12-8 



[ 



PUBUC NOTICE 



] 



NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY 
OF THE ANNUAL, REPORT OF 

THE ALAN AND ESTHER 
FLEDERFOUWDATON 

TAKE NOTICE, that the 
Annual Report of the above 
Foundation for the taxable year 
ending September 30, 1995 as 
required by 9 6056 of die Internal 
Revenue Code of 1954, is avail- 
able for inspection at the prin- 
cipal office of tiie Foundauon, 
500 E. Main Street Suite 1424. 
Norfolk. Virginia 23510, during 
regular business hours by any 
citizen who request it within 180 
days after die publication of the 
notice of its availability. Requests 
for Inspection should be made to 
die undersigned Principal Man- 
ager at the Office as above stated. 

Signed by: ALAN FLEDER 

Date: 11/30/95 

49-1 
1+12-8 



PUBLICNOTICE 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE IN RE: 
DONNA MARIE WEBB. Waintiff 

V. 

MICHAEL JEFFREY WEBB, 
Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION - 
CASE NO. 95-2657 

The object of diis suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii upiMi die grounds of 
oite year sepfi^^on. 

It is ORDERED diat Michael 
Jeffrey Webb appear uid protect 
his interest, tm or before January 
29, 19%. which date is no so(mer 
dian fifty days after entry of this 
mtter of iHiblication. 

And it is furdier ORDERED 
diat diis order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in Virginia 
Beach Sun. a newspaper of 
general circulation in this City 
presmbed by diis crart 

November 28. 1995 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By Alcsha Lindsey. Deputy 
Clerk 

49-1 
4+12-29 



t^mg imi^sm^'emimmmmtammmmmm^Kit^imtm m i ly-n 



9 Vintmai Beach Sun. Rkiay. Decembg |5. 1995 





Classifieds 



CAIX TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL- IN FORM 



AmiCLES FOR SALE 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

Itbne 
2 times 
4 times 



20 Words 
ocleaa 

$ 7.50 
$ 13.50 
$ 22.50 



Ajkjdtioral 
words 

.35 

.70 

1.40 



Run your Classified Ad four times for only $22.50. You can cancel 
your ad at any time. 

AN Classified Ads run in three newspapers (The Virginia Beach Sun. The Chesap- 
eake Post and The Portsmouth Times). No additional charge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 



20 words 



Run my ad for 

Payment Is enclosed $ . 



Issues. 



Make check payable to Byerly Publlcattom 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23327 

Name_ 

Address . 

City 

FOR HELP with your Classified Ad. please call 547-4571. 

COMBINATION RATE: Run thk um* p««inil ad In any oOwr Bywly PubNcaNont immiMOiK lor an 
addMonal t3 on* ttma, SS Ma limM. 17 tour tknH. NwMpapwt In FranUIn, Empoita. UtWMCMila, ' 
DimfkMii and PMwibuty. Call 547-4571 tor dalali. 



AIRLINE TICKETS 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



One way. anytime, anywhere in 
U.S. $300. Roundtrip no advance 
for $425. Call 1-800-925-4704 

1/5 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



SPAMSH SPEAKERS 

People with contacts in Latin 
America wanted to cash in on 
International Markets. Call 499- 
4133. 1^/96 

I Lavern Williams Morris as of 
12/4/95 am no longer responsit)le 
for any debts other than my own. 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY 

EDRfOMRDS! 

LOVE BRUCE. M.J. & SAKI 

$ SAVE $ SLASH YOUR 
GROCERY BILLS BY UP TO 50%. 

CALL FOR DETAILS: n>4-340- 
5234. 12/15 

SELECTIVE SINGLES DANCE 
EVERY MONDAY! 

Dating services are not for us! 
Biggest singles party in Tidewater 
for the over 28 career singles. 
7:(K) til midnight. Dress casual! Tell 
a single friend! Mitty's, Omni 
Newport News Hotel, $5. l-64/Exit 
258-A. 804-249-5452. Lila. 
12/29 



ASTROLOGY SERVICES 

Your personal computer horo- 
scope, no 900 #'s. For information 
Send $2.00/ refunded first order 
to: CEMA 522 Austin St. Norfolk 
Va. 23503. 12/8 

"DONATE"CARS" 

"BOATS"RVS" 

"TRUCKS" 

Jewist) Heritage fw the Blind. Tax 

deductible. Prompt pick-up. 

NEED NOT RUN. 

1-800-2-CJONATE 

1-800-236-6283 

12/1 

" DONT DRINK THE WATER" 

Counter top water treatment 
system. Filters out Chlorine, lead 
and many other common water 
pollutants up to 10,000 gallons. 
NTL tested. 99% reduction 
Guaranteed. Easy to install. 
Christmas special 199.95 includes 
shipping and handling. Please 
send check or money order to 
Damon P.O. Box 62382 Va 
Beach, Va 23466 or call 579- 
1452, tor free home demo. 

Mormons, JW's, Masonry, New 
Age; What do they really t>elieve? 
For free booklet call Cornerstone 
Ministries at 1-868-0793. 12/8 



Service Directory 



AUTO SERVICE 



POWER WASHING 



BALDWIN TOWING 

Flat bed sen/ice $30 

Days 545-6002, 

Evenings, beeper 578-9581 

Junk cars bought $50 & up. 

1« 



CHILD CARE 



PRESSURE CLEANERS 

2500 - $599, 3200 - $899, 

Hondas. 13hp, 3200 PSI, $1198. 

400 PSI, $1699, Call for Factory 

Direct Catalog. 

24/hrs Overnight Delivery. 1-800- 

917-WASH(9274) 



GREAT BfUDQE AREA- Chikj care 
in my home, all ages, Full-time, 
Part-time. Meals & snack* 
provMed. Plenty of activities, fully 
supervised. Licensed/ insured, 
non-smoker. Quality care in a 
faojily^ home. Call anytime 482- 
42te or 519-4(»7, pager. 12^2 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



£ 



EANING / JANITORIAL SVC 



Cleaning- Profassnnal cleaning. M 
reasonable rates, move out , 
wifKtows. CaN Eliz 484-4336. 

12/29 



PAINTING / DECORATINQ 



mmr/kOE pawtwo co. 

Meriors, Exteriors, 

Power Washir^. Ded(s, 

Sheet Rod( Rapaire, SpacWmg. 

Licensed/ Inewed 

Free Estimi^ 

Exceltonce is our trademwk 

4M-3Mt 



Santa for ChristRMS 

private parties, 

house visits 

4 yrs. mparienca at 

Lynnhaven Mall. 

CaU 471-56-05 wk. 427-4433 

12/22 

Disc Jockeys available for 
Christmas & New years parties, 
wadding tm^pOonn ate. Starting 
at $175, oontrct F%»e or Dur»tt t& 
857-7749. Gospel groups 
avail^le f^ fund raisers. Bands 
also available. 12/22 

Senta^Mis 

For Nausa cals & parties 

Call 543-7447 

12/22 



Bassinet whKe only 2 1/2 months 
$30. Call Julie work 547-4571 
home 398-0902. tfn 



Pine Thomasville dinning room 
table and chairs, 2 arm chairs, all 
chairs with padding plus 2 extra 
leaves for table. $1000 or best 
offer. 482-1428. tfn 

Daybed - White iron & brass, W/2 
Orthopedk: Mattress, still in plastic, 
pop up trundle. Cost $ 800 sell for 
$325. Call 481-6748. 12/8 

Bed Brass - Queen size with 
orthopedic mattress set. Still in 
plastk:. Cost $1,000 sell for $300. 
Call 481-7191. 12/8 



ANTIQUES / COLLECTIBLES 



ANTIQUES- 10,000 SQUARE FT. 

of artglass, furniture, paintings, 

cfocks, much morel 

1804.Granby St. 

622-0905 dir. 

12/15 



ARTS / UNFURNISHED 



HISTORIC PORT NORFOLK- 

Newly remodeled 1 bedroom apt. 
Formal dining room. $499 per 
month, discounted rent includes 
utilities, immediate occupancy 1- 
423-725-5988. 1/5 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



Ferrari- 1988- 328 red. 

$3,000 dollar stereo, telephone, 
radar. 17,000 miles, excellent 
condition. 46,000. Bob 804-295- 
8040. 12/15 



AUTOS /JUNK -WANTED 



D&D TOWING 

Professional wrecker services, 
AAA approved- 24 hours. Local 
tows $25.00. Cash for cars any 
condition. Licensed/ Certified/ 
Insured. Call DO TOW ME (368- 
0963) 12/15 

$$ CASH PAID $$ 

For vehicles, 1980 and up, with 
bad engines, bad transmissk>ns or 
wrecked. Some exceptions. Call 
456-0057. 1/5 

AAA-1 AUTO JUNK 

Junked or wrecked call for top 
prices. Ihr. pickup. 545- 6002. 

AUTOS A(^£PTED 

any make, year or condition 

TOP $$$ 

FAST FREE TOWING! 

545-2821 

' im 

JUNK CAIS 

Ped( Recycling now buying whole 
cars at Elm Ave. Ports. VA. Call 
399-4075 for info. 1/5 



BOATS 



HERRA- 198S - 27 FT 

Continental, twin volvo, every 
option, excellent condition, 81 
original hours. Bob 804-295-8040 

12/15 



^ 

BUILDING MATERIALS 



PRE-ENGINEERED STEEL 
BLDGS. FACTORY SAVINGS. 
24X30. 36X36, 48X66, AND 
80X125. LIMITED SUPPLY. 
RESERVE YOURS NOW. CALL 
547-3323. 11/10 

METAL BUILDING MANUFAC- 
TURER SELfeCTING SMALL OR 
LARGE BUILDER/ DEALER IN 
SOME OPEN AREAS. HIGH 
PROFIT POTENTIAL. 

ACCEPTING ONLY THE BEST 
QUALIFIED. CALL (303) 758- 
4135, EXT. 1500. 11/10 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



Steel building business is 
booming 1 1 Natkjnal Manufwturer 
to qualifying deal^s In saleti c^n 
markets. Big profits on sates end/ 
or constructton. Call (303) 759- 
320), ext. ^)0. 12« 



Either you want to have personal 
afKj finmcial freedom in the next 
36 moflHw or you donti N y«w (to 
it only takes a phone ciril. If you 
don't respond to this ad, in 6 
months. You'll wwh ^u hadi 4«- 
08(». 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS 



PERSONALIZED CHILDREN'S 
STORYBOOKS. Great presents 
for holidays, birthdays, etc. Find 
out about this hot- selling gift! 
Amazing recorded message gives 
details. 468-1561, ext. 106. 

12/15 



CLASSES / SCHOOLS 



Train to be Aviatton Mechank: 

in Pampano Beach, FL 

For January 29th class, 60 weeks 

Training, Financial aid 

and housing available. 

Job placement assistance 

Call Pompano Academy 

1-800-545-7262 

12/29 

BARMASTERS OF VA BEACH 
Bartending ediool 

1141 Independence Blvd. 1-2 wks 
day / evening classes Job/ place- 
ment assistance. Lowest tuition in 
area. For Free Class / 464-0500. 

12/15 



COINS / STAMPS / HOBBIES 



BUY SELL COINS - GoM & Silver 
items. Military items & other 
collectibles. Collectors Choice, 
5441 Va. Beach Bhrd. 497-5950. 

12/15 



COMPUTERS / EQUIPMENT 



MEGA CONSULTANTS- HOME 
TUTOR SERVICE- Windows, Dos, 
Internet, Computer set up. Mon- 
Sat. 9am -6pm. 855-8389. 

ALL PC 

REPAIRS AND UPGRADES 

HOUSECALLS 

PC DOC 456-909S 



ENTERTAINMENT 



CLUB ESCORT 

Beautiful girls tor aH occassions 

providing alternative entertainment 

for the definitive male. 

548-9697 
Hiring men and women. 

m_ 

ALL STARZ ENTERTAINMENT 

High class ladies for private 
parties, dancing, dining, massage 
and morel DON'T HESITATE 
CALL FOR THE BEST. 499-0865 
12/15 

AFTER 6 437-0692 

Professtonal Exotic male/ female 
dancers and masseuse on call 
24hrsll DON'T CALL THE REST- 
WEVE GOT THE BESTI Available 
for clubs/ private parties. 1 2/1 5 



FARM /LAND /TIMBER 



CAMDEN COUNTY, NC 

312 acrM wooded. 

48 acres cleared. 

Sealed bMs only through 12/7/95 

NO LOTS 

Micheal D. Heal 919-356-2747 



HELP WANTED 



Executive Search- A well 
established health care company 
o|Mns new diviston poised in the 
Preventive Health Care Market. 
Seeking several individuals to 
head up expanston in Tidewater 
area. For informatton sand resume 
to: Kim Murphy, Personnel, 1719 
Birch Trail Circle, Suite E, 
Chesapeake, Va. 23320. 12/1 

EXTRAORDINARY CAREER OPP- 
ORTUNITY. Available with the 
fastest growing telecomm- 
unications company in America. 
Motivated self starters, who desire 
their own business needed 496- 
9037. 12« 



RREWOOD / FUELS 



Firewood- 95% oak cut, split $ 
delivered. 1 ton pbkup. Call 804- 
860-8046. 1/5 



HELP WANTED 



THE PERFECT JOB 

$400 a week full time, 

several pec^le needed to do 

promcMtonal work in the 

exciting photograi^ fieM. 

^to ei^riei^ rweessaiy. 

We train. C^ 4»-^» 

1/S 



COMMUraCAT10N84Jattonal Vm, 
expanding in Tktewater area. 
Seeking sharp, highly mothraled 
indhrkfciato wMi y>od public Mis. 
CtM 36e-(»48. 12/15 



Set your owt\ hours full/ part time. 
For unique home service 
company. Direct salM/ real Mtate 
experience a plus. Call HSA 497- 
1040. 1^ 

DRIVERS 

$ HOLIDAY CASH$ 

$150 PERDAY 
Earnhig Potential 

Work your own hours. Be your 
own boss. Must be 23 yrs. Good 
DMV record. Norfolk Chedwr Taxi. 
855-9009, ask for Bob Jones. 
12/15 

PAY 
ATTENTKM 

Last year I graduated from 
college and was frustrated with the 
lack of opportunities in todays job 
market. Then I met a millionaire 
and my last months check was 
over $3,000.00! 5 career minded 
indivkfuals needed now! Call 468- 
21 73. 12/15 

NOW STAFHNQ 

Internatkjnal company expanding 
into Tidewater area, need reps/ 
trainers/ managers. Extensive 
training provided, opportunity for 
travel available. 468-0890. 12/15 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 

Hiring IMMEDIATELY, will train, 
flexible shifts starting at 5, 5:30 & 
6 pm. Incentive raises & new. 
employee bonus. Lynnhaven 
area. Call Nancy 468-4002. 
12/15 

TRAIN TO BE AVIATION 
MECHANIC IN POMPANO BEACH 
FL. FOR JANUARY 29TH CLASS. 
60 WEEKS, TRAINING, 
FINANCIAL AID AND HOUSING 
AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT 
ASSISTANCE 1-800-545-7262. 

12/29 



Brand New Office 

All poshtons to staff entire office, 
17 people needed immediately 
WE TRAIN III Must be 18 or oMer, 
have car and available now. If 
you're not making $7/hr. Call Ron 
at466r8560. . ,... 112/8- 

COLLECTORS 

For law firm 

Experience required. 

Part-time evenings and Saturdays 

Call Mrs. Stampe 490-6292. 
12/15 

"• HO! HO! HO! *** 

TELEMARKETING- CALL 

CENTER 

Don't Wait Until After The 
Holidays, Earn Your $$$ NOW. 
Seeking enthusiastic individuals 
with a great phone vok;e and a 
personality to match. Permanent 
Part time Positions with Day and 
Evening hours available. Paid 
Training and Daily $$$ incentives. 
Call 368-0273. 

TEXAS REFINERY CORP.- needs 
mature (responsible) person now 
in CHESAPEAKE area. 
Regardless of training, write W.B. 
Hopkins, DbjA. w-23320. Box 711, 
R.Worth, TX. 76101. 

* POSTAL JOBS • 

12.68/ hr to start, plus benefits. 
Carriers, sorters, computer 
trainees. For an applicatfon and 
exam information, call 1-219-791- 
1191, ext. p43 9am-9pm 7 days. 
12/8 

A-1 OPPORTlffOTY - AVON 

Sell quality products - home, 
workplaces, flexible hours - 
supplement income. Potential 
$200-$1,000 -I- monthly. Avon ind. 
sales rep. 1-8(X)-962-4998. 11^ 



NO JOKE 

S3-$5K/IVI0NTH 



Tired of answering 
rMiculous or misleading 
«js? Well, I'm tired of 
intenriewh^) pe(^ who 
(tonl have a due about 
initltthm or dedbatbn. I 
need 4 quiritty people who 
nn He^ me run thto 
efflee and develop a 
oouf^ ol others in the 
area. No experience 
necMsary, tr^rihig sMd. 
PL£A^...d&nTiMSton9' 
tfme »■ yours. Sertous 
Inquiries on^ from self 
tterters I can Xak» under 
myidrfno. 

aM4K)06 



hILP WANTED 



MARKETING 

Internsrtlonaf brokerage firm has 5 

openings. Applicants must be fun 

& people oriented. Unlimited 

potential $50,000 + Call 423- 

7275. 

TELEPHCmE SALES 

Established business in Great 
Bridge area of Chesapeake is 
seeking full-time or (Sart-time 
telephone solicitors. Experience 
prefered, but not necessary. You 
must have good spelling ability, 
legible handwritting and an 
intelligent willingness to learn. 
Most important you must enjoy 
dealing with the public by 
telephone . You should live in or 
near the Great Bridge area. Salary 
is based On hours worked. If 
interested, please write fully, giving 
your qualifications to: Telephone 
Solicitor, P.O. box 1327, 
Chesapeake, Va. 23327. 

We are looking for a few energetk: 
people to sell subscriptions to 
three local publications. If 
interested call Julie at 547-4571. 



HOMES /SALE 



FORCLOSURE SALE. 3 bedroom, 
1 1/2 bath, 1513 McDaniel st. 
Portsmouth $75,000.00. ALL 
OFFERS CONSIDERED, Low 
Down Low Payment Financing, 
METROPOLITAN MORTGAGE, 
1800-541-0828 EXT 515, ASK 
FOR BOB GUNNING. 1/5 

ALL CLOSING COST PAID 

on any VA/HUD owned home, vet 
or non-vet. Bobby Scott & 
Associates Real Estate 490-7826. 

12/15 



LOANS / MORTGAGES 



HOME OWNERS 

We have the beet 

rates In to¥vn. 

All credit considered. 

1st, 2nd, 3rd Mortages. 

Very Low Payments 

Consolidate Bills. 

No Equity? 

Bankruptcy OKI 

Call 1-800-664-6779 

Bill or Lewis 

INRNITY FUNDING CORP. 

12/22 

FAST CASH 
for HOMEOWNERS 

All credit considered. 
1st, 2nd, 3rd Mortgages. Low 
rates. Low payments. 
ConsolkJate bills. 

No Equity? 

Bankruptcy OK. 

Call 1-800-913-9816 

Jeff Rusch 

UNITED SOUTHERN MORTAGE 

1/5 



LOST /STRAYED 



CAT- OLD GREAT NECK RD. 
AREA -$500 REWARD 

"pickett" Black, white paws, white 
on face and stomach, mala, 
neutered, declawed, shorthaired. 
No collar. Lost 8/6. Call Roy or 
Dlborah. 340-7484 or 651-6513 
or 650-1 124 or 855-3071 . 1^ 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CURRITUCK COUNTY- 5 choke 
buikling tots. Some wooded. Near 
the Cotton Gin at Jarvisburg. 
Priced to sell. $18,500 ea. Bill 
Robbins 1-919-453-2126 days 1- 
919-453-6950 eves. 12/29 



MASSAGE 



ABSOLUTELY DIVINE 

Therapeutk; massage now 
available at super convenient 

Chesapeake kx:attoni 

Professbnat, ABMP Certified. 

GIFT CERTIFICATES! 

Call Paula 437-0921 or 629-7838 

pager. 12/15 

MASSAGE BY TMJ 

Carpal Tunnel, headaches, back 
pains, whiplash, arthritis, hernias, 
chionic pains, fatigue, hip/ leg 
problems. Aaron 428-6923. Emily 
747-0365. 12/29 



MISC FOR SALE 



KILL ROACHES! 
ENFORCER. OverNite Roach 
Spray or OverNite Pest Control 
Cioncentrate. Makes up tq 2 
galtons for fast and lasting roach 
control. GUARANTEED! Available 
at DAIL'S HOME CENTER AND 
f»BBIES HOME CENTER. 

12^9 



Virginia Beach Sun. Friday. December IS. 1995 9 



Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



MOBILE HOMES / SALE 



Mobil* Home Rnancs Co. 

Has monay to land 

No points, No cbsing cost. 

$799 down will guarantaa you a 

home . 1st. Time Buyer Program. 

Call 804-249-0764. 

Oakwood Homes ^/S 

1995 3 BR Repo 

Asauma pmts. of only $215. 

And move In today. 

Call 804-249-0764. 

sp 18.5k tim 180 dp 1000 apr 

1 1 .0. Oakwood Homes. 1 /5 



MOBILE HOME SITES 



COLONIAL RUN MOBILE HOME 
PARK • Vacant spaces- Rents av< 
eraging $237 • $252 monthly. 
Sites available now. 804-464- 
0770. 12/18 



MOTORCYCLES 



WEBUYUSEDHARLEYSII 

SOUTHSIDE HARLEY DAVIDSON 
499-8964. 

1/19 

HARLEYS WANTEDIII 
Caah for your HARLEYS tpdayl 
Top dollar paid for good clean 
H/U^LEYS. take the hassle out of 
ielling your HARLEY. I will come 
to you. Cash paid for Info on 
HARLEYS for aale. Call CHAD at 
Hampton Roads Harley* DavMeon, 
804'867-6549. and Peninsula 
804-245-5221. Mon-Fri. 9-7, Sat 

9-5. Va. DIr. 12/22 

■~~~— ■■— — ^^-^~— r~-"~— ■"— "^ 

CASH 

TOP DOLLAR PAID 

For motorcycles, water craft, ATVs 

& 4 wheelere. Will pick up at your 

location. Call anytime. Leave 

message if no answer. 

SRS Motor Sports 

910-272-9827 

12/1 



PERSONALS 



ADOPTION 

I am an adorable 3 year old 
looking for a newborn brother or 
sister to share my loving parents 
and beautiful home. Twins 
weteome. Please call Bob & Lisa 
anytime 1-600-6 19-2 186. 1/5 



ADOPTION 

Your^ happily married couple who 
cannot have children wishes to 
adopt baby. WILL SHARE 
PHOTOS, LETTERS AS CHILD 
GROWS, IP DESIRED. Will pay 
medical, legal expenses. Miriam 
and Jeff 1-800-484-3253 code 
3103. , 1/5 

Adopt: Devoted caring couple 
wishes U) give an Infant a kivlng 
home. We guarantee a bright and 
happy future. Legal / Medical 
paki. Please call Denise & Rocco 
1-800-428-1901. 12/29 



PERSONALS 



2 Bedroom Furnlahcd 
Portsmouth area $ 3,000 cash or 
$ 1,000 and $ 200 for 12 months , 
12 wide. Call 485-3712 or 804- 
262-0604. 12/22 



Bkyibia 91- 14 x 80, 3 bedroom, 
2 bath, Cellini] fans throughout, 
refrigerator, stove, screened 
porch, fenced, shed, wash/ dry 
possible, 20,500. Call 545-9190. 

Clayton- 91 2 bedraoms, 2 full 
baths, hot tub in master bedroom. 
Central heat A A/C, Inside Just 
remodeled. Must see $18,000. 
919-232-3816. 12/1 

Big beautiful doublewlde. 

Only 1200 down. 

Only $285 per month. 

Only one to sell. 

Call 804-249-0764 

sp 36k apr 9.7 tim 300 

Oakwood Homes. 1/5 



ADOPTION 

Happily married couple, unable to 
have chiklren, wishes to adopt 
newborn. A happy home with tots 
of love and security promised, vm 
pay Legal/ Medical expenses. 
Call Las and Marianne collect 7(8- 
356-4576. 12/29 

My name is DavW, I am 2 1/2^ 
living in Christian family. Mommy Is 
R.N. staying home with me. We 
want a brother or sister. Can pay 
expenses. Call Paul And Mary. 
703-257-5070. 12/8 

ADOPTION 

We know you are faced with a 
difficult choice. Let us help you 
find a k)vlng, caring home for your 
baby. WE ARE EASY TO TALK 
TO. Please call FRIENDS IN 
ADOPTION 1-800-982-3678. 1/5 

SINGLE GIRLS & GUYS 

kwking for kive & romance? Call 
your personal dateline to meet 
your matchi 1-900-255-2525. Ext 
8157. $2.99/ min 18 + Tch-Tn Fon 
Req. SERV U 619-645-8434. 
12/29 

SPORTSI TRIVIA AND SCORES. 
COLLEGE AND PROFESSK}NAL. 
FOOTBALL, BASEBALL, BASK- 
ETBALL, HOCKEY. UPDATED 
DAILY. 1-900-226-4967. (2.95 
PER MINUTE) MUST BE 18 
YEARS. TOUCH TONE 
REQUIRED. 12/8 

BEACH PARTY ENTERTAINMEHT 

Hottest dateline 1-900-287-6445 
$2.99/ mIn. Muat be 18+ 
- 12/1 

Mateh Maker »totwork 
Share Thia Holiday Saaaon Call 
1-800*SM*7a78 ext 12. One 
simple phone oall, and aee for 
yourself Just how easy It can be. 
Honaati CALL TODAY $2.49/ 
mIn, 18 yrs + HTP Va. Boh. Va. 
804-430-DATE (3283) 2/9 

New Life Chrlatlan Dating 
Aganoy Ino. 

Looking for someone special? Call 
today for Info about epeolal 
Introductory rate. No obligation. 
Call free 1-800-823-7789. 

Physic tells you about your 
financial future, k>ve and auoeess 
& your health 1-900-820-esoo ext 
2482. $3.99 par min, muat be 18 
yra. Prooall Co. 602-954-7420 



Looking foi someone aboard the . 
USS Liberty In the 60'8. Piaaaa 
write to P.O. BOX 1327 
Chesapeake, Va 23320 Attn: USS 
Liberty. My father is looking for 
shipmates. tfn 

24 year oU mother of 3 seeking a 
friend to go out and have fun wHh 
NO HANKY PANKYI Interest are: 
singing. Karaoke, Country & 
Classto mck, comedy clubs, danc- 
ing, etc... Locke & age unimpor- 
tantl Serious inquires only. 
Let's be friends I Write: P.O. Box 
1327 (A-1) Chesapeake, Va. 
23327. 



Kl I All 



Cone wok wiAttiiad And rat n^ 
Off Mwdtiei raie ui m average of 
40% idgteiim otter t^aiteiaromd 
the country in lU areu of Job 

MBvnKflOB. 

We have poiitions for Maaaier 
Ti«lass,Airi«aBtMaBa|crradndl 
and fwrt Itee Srics AModaln tt 
Lynte^ Mai. Bea^ti indutk 

•4011C Package 

MetUhADemil 

•MiM^ToonBonu 

•CmerAdvmcemoit 
Weaqiiinlie: 

Mtetmii^ tewnti Devei^mau 

Merahiiiaiaiy Custonw Sovioe 

MoMt^Temiraiic 

Poriafaiteview.ciU 1-800-7S6-6266 

v^aiaU box #4447. Ei^ Spirit A 



PETS 



Border collie puppies- very toyal 
intelligent pets/ exceptional 
herding dogs $75.00 each. Older 
Male / Female, Free to good 
home 804-562-2833. 12^ 



Pit bull pups- ADBA/UKC 
registered. 1st shots and wormed. 
Parents on premisee. Stud servtee 
available. Call 340-8373. 12/1 

HAPPY JACK SKIN BALM: 
Checks scratching, relieves hot 
spots and Irritated skin without 
sterotos. Promotes healing i hair 
growth on doge & catsi Available 
0-T-C INDUSTRIAL HDWE 543- 
2237. 



f 

Satellite 



CtOoHialDmeHM 



Satellite Wooing Facility in 
Qmqieake. V^ijiiua will be 
accepting applications for 
employment on Saturday, 
December 16th at the Holiday 
Inn Chesapeake located at: 725 
Woodlid» l>. betwesi the iKMjrs 
of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. 
Positions available include 
employment in die areas of 
concessions, maintenance, 
management and wagering 



REAL ESTATE 



Truetee muet eelh Remodeled 
Triplex. Great cash ftow. Reduced 
to 84,900 or best offer 1-423-725- 
5988. 1^ 



ROOMS FOR RENT 



GREAT BRIDGE CONDO 

Single female seeks same 2 
bedroom, washer/ dryer. $300 
month Includes all. $150 deposit, 
no pets. 548-4231. 12/8 



ROOM FOR RENT- GREEN RUN 
AREA. Large furnished room, 
private bath, walk in closet, 
laundry & kitchen privileges. $75 
wk. deposit required, references 
Dave/Deb 468-1006. 12/1 

THOMAS NELSON HOTEL 

Phone, color TV, daily maid 
service. Daily $21 'f tax, also 
weekly rates 622-4341, Granby 
St., Downtown Norfolk. 12/29 



TICKETS 



GREAT PHANTOM TICKETSII 
Rear dress circle. IndivMuai tk^kets 
$46.50 with packages available 
Dec. 15th, 16th, 22nd, 23rd, 29th 
and 30th. Also New years eve 
packages available. 393-2573 ext. 
7993. HolWay Inn Portsmouth. 



TOWN HOMES /RENT 



ELEGANT TOWN HOUSE 
Near Frederick & Deep Creek In 
Portsmouth, Just off 1-264. 
Fireplace, 2 bedroom, 1 1/2 baths, 
appliances Included. Immaculate 
condition. $450.00 monthly. 
Lease and saeurity deposit. 
Owner. Call 804-826-6602. 12/1 



TRAVEL 



SKI SNOW SHOE 
West Virginia. 1 & 2 bedroom 
units, sleeps 4-8. Whistle punk, 
Snoworest, Powderidge, Fireplace, 
cable, VCR, Jacuzzi, owner ratea. 
Can Unda 803-277-7449, fax 803- 
299-1 323. 1/5 

BAHAMA CRUISE 

5 daya / 4 nighta 

UNDERBOOKEDI MUST SELL) 

$279 / oouplol LIMITED TICKETSI 

1-800-935-9999 EXT. 6423 

Monday through Saturday 

9am- 1(^m 

1/5 



TRUCKS FOR SAUE 



1950 Ford Ptekup 

Backwooda handyman 

Speclall Has 2 motors 

$350 ( does not run) 

Call 479-9863 after 1 pm 

Monday-Friday 1 pm to 7 pm 

Saturday i Sunday. 



LOOKINQ FOR BIOLOQICAL 
MOTHER-ef ehHd bom April 14ih, 
1077, adopted mother woriad at 
White Tewsr en ytHe Crk Rd. Any 
Info,plaaaeoalil87'7800. 



Get A Life! 



I Not Just An Apartment! | 



LUXURY APARTMENTS 
&TOWNHOMES 

Finieia (XMTER • TCItm COURTS 

OLYMPIC aOE POOL • nJTTMQ QREEN 

JMUZZI«aKUItfrYfTAFF 

!HoUy (Point 

CALL 424-7867 

On ProvWanei Rd, 2 Mlas Wast of 
IWItsryHwy^OpwMoa.SaLI-S 

1992 Award Of Exa.Ucnoe 



TRUCKS FOR SALE 



91 FORD EXPLORER XLT 
Loaded, am/fm cassette stereo, 
power windows & door locks, tilt 
wheal, cruise control, sun/moon 
roof. Good condition. $12,000, 
book value $15,300. Call 429- 
9316. tfnsb 



WANTED TO BUY 



AAGUTARS WANTED*^ 

Cash paid for used acoustic or 
electric guitars and amps. 595- 
466« 1^ 

OW electronic parts, tubes. Big okl 
speakers, tube HiFi amps. Old 
electronic books, catologs. Call 
703-856-8277. 12/29 

Looking for parts for a 1967 Ford 
Fairlane 4 door Sedan. Please call 
399-7907 after 6:00 until 10:00 
Pf" tfn 



GiveT 

ABILITY 

a chance. 



C 1994 Niiioiii Eiiltf S«i) Socnty 




(;iM II 
II roi I 



Suggest that memorial 
contributions be made 

to the Muscular 

Dystrophy Association 

and honor a loved one 

by helping a million 

Americans with 

neuromuscular 

diseases. 



1-800-572-1717 



Thli ipict praviiM u t public Krvice. 



MISSING CAT 
Old Great Neck Rd. Area 

$500 

IREWARD 

Black, 

white paws, 

white on 

face and 

sttmach. 

Male, 

neutered, 

deciawed, 

short haired, 

No collar. 

LOST 8/6 

Call Roy 
or 

Deborah 
340-7484 or 
651-6513 or 
650-1124 or 

855-3071 




i^ 



Many happj returns. 




Give tlw gift that ^ves \»ck iikhc than yas've given. Fc -, little 
u $23, you can give a piece of America to someone you care rrrut. 
Aik your bttiux fw a gift certificate upon purchase. 



mertcaOiLA 



'Me 
»ock 
'"America 



SWINGS 

Bcms 






iiMS«r*n 




BLANKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Classifieds are 

published In 78 state newspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $225. 

(For more than 25 words there is an additional 
charge of $8.00 per word.) 

Call 047"407X for Classified Representative 



SEIZED CARS FROM t17S. dtmonatralor modala ivdlibla Im- - t1t7,47/Mo. Ptrk-llk« tatting w/ 
Poraehti, Cadlllaca, Chevya, madlataly. Factory ovarruni. Buy 5 mIn. walk to unapollad riviar - 
BMWe, COfvttlal. Alao Jaeps, 4 (aetofydlrect. SAVETH0U8ANDSI relax OflUhl On new rd Heady to 
WO'e. Yourwaa. ToNtraa 1-eOO- Call Stan toll-lraa1-800'341-700r. bulld.camporrellra. Callnow304- 
89B-8778 Ext. A-5139 tor eurrant 482-5428. Fin. 10yraate.76%AHM. 

Bitlnsi. Fae. DRIVEHS— Tractor TraHarTralnlr^g lie7.47/mo. 

naarRlchmondl Save $1 ,000++ over 
QOVERNMENT FORECLOSED Alllancal 3 waaki or 8 weekende, ABANDONED HOMESITEI 3S 
HOMES lor pannlaa on $1. Dalin- Average $30,000 lint yaarl Ship- Acrai ■ $48,800. Qorgeoua mix of 
quent Tax, Rapo'e, REO'i, FDIC, para Choice of VA. Inc. 1-800/646- woode&meadowi. Level, tacluded 
RTC, IRS. Your area. Toll free 1- 2374. with apring. On State road, utill- 

800-888-8778 Ext. H-5138for cur- tiee, perced. Exoollent financing, 

rent llttlngt. Fae. DRIVERS ■ Solo tTeema, $2000.00 Only one. Call now S40-662-82 16. 

Sign On. Top Taama Earn 
HOME TYPISTS NEEDED. Alio $103,000+, Major Baneflti/Uotel & 3STATEVIewil 1 1 1 Acrea/Spring 
PC/Wordprooaieoruaera. $40,000/ DaadheadPay. Driving School Qrada $84,777. Woode, flalde, viewe t 
year Inooma potential. Toll free 1- Welcome. Covenant Tranaport 800- pondilta. Super hunting 4-mllei • 
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10 Virginia Beach Sun. Friday. Decembg 15. 1^5 



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The Virginia Beacii Sun 



Friday. December 22. 1995 



VIRGINIA BEACH NEWS and VIEWS 



67th Yec 



Beach takes 
lead in call 
for 'stable' 
transportation 

By LEE CAHILL 
City Council Reporter 

Virginia Beach is taking the 
lead in establishing "stable and 
reliable" funding source for 
transportation. 

City council, by a vote of 10-1 
(with councilwoman Nancy 
Parker dissenting), adopted a 
resolution last wedc expressing its 
support for funding of public 
transportation to be provided in 
Hampton Roads. 

The region is currently served 
by James City County Transit, 
the Peninsula Transportation 
District Commission (PEN- 
TRAN), and the Tidewater 

Transportation District Commis- 
asm. 

Mayor Meyera Obemdorf said 
the city can take the lead in 
finding a way to continue public 
transportation in the region by 
asking the other 15 localities in 
the region to endorse similar 
rea>lutions. 

Councilwoman Barbara Henley, 
who ii a - member of a 
subcommittee under the General 
Assembly appointed to study a 
stable funding source, requested 
the resolution. Localities have 
been concerned that cuts in 
federal funding and the lack of a 
specific funding source to support 
public transportation will kill 
what transportation there is in the 
region. 

The Tidewater Regional Transit 
alone this year is reaching a 
funding loss of 47.6 percent in 
federal operating funding, and 
funding is expected to be totally 
eliminated in the near future. 

Localities have been dependent 
on general funds and local 
treasuries for their share of the 
cost. However, local 
governments, as the resolution 
points out, must choose between 
funding for transportation and 
other essential services. 

How the fund would be 
financed has not been pinpointed, 
but a tax of 2 percent on motor 
fuel could be used, with the 
measure calling for a decrease in 
the rate estate tax to an amount 
equivalent to what the city is 
paying for public transportation 
now. 

Johh Malbon, chairman of the 
Virginia Beach Transportation 
Committee, said that mass transit 
is essential and that the 
community must continue to 
provide viable transportation. 

The committee, he said, 
supports a dedicated funding 
source. 

Councilman Robert K. Dean 
asked whether this is a way to get 
a foot in the door to fund a 
lightrail system between Norfolk 
and Virginia Beach. 

Cynthia Boulevard, represent- 
ing the Hampton Roads Public 
Transportation Alliance and an 
'assistant {Ht>fessor at tlKs Virginia 
Beach campus of Tidewater 
Community College, the 
su^rarters were talking about 
trying to maintain the present 
service. She said that 
transportatifm is a key issue in 
making welfare vrark. 

"In the short term," said Vk;e 
Mayor William Sessions., "if we 
don;t have a dedicated souit* we 
will have z«d. A lot of people 
wUl faQ thnxigh the aacks. 

Henley said that no specific 
recommenduion is being nuKk to 
the subcommit^ on how moiwy 
for the fund would te raised 
because the committee needs a 
way to ba% r^ommoidadoM m 
all U% infomMMM. 



I 



Santa makes a 
special delivery! 

The came "bearing" gifts - of 
\xars\ Hundreds of Virginia geai^ 
city employees tias proven "bear-- 
y" ^nerous this holiday season, 
donating their time and talent to 
dressing and decorating 1,100 
teddy tiears for an annual project 
that benefits needy children In tiie 
Hampton Roads area. Virginia 
Bcadi City Hall was covered witfi 
bears of virtually every 
conceivable occupation - from 
pilot bears to cowboy bears to 
beach twrn bears. There was even 
a bear nativity scene complete 
with the barn animals! The doors 
to City Hall were then opened 
wide to welcome a very special 
visitor, Santa Claus, as he 
delivered bears from the Sheriffs 
Office in style. He came diving i^ 
up not In a sled, but a limousine. 
Young David Keller III was 
especially pleased to sit In Santa's 
lap and have a "close encounter" 
with the jolly old elf. For more 
about the bear dilve, see pt§t 3. 




Pham by Cvoli J. Amolo ' 




Jaycees share spiri t of giving with k\6s 

40 Beach youths treated to holiday 
shopping spree for their families 



By ViaORIA HECHT 
SunEcfltor 

Eight-year-old Chris Miller 
stood wi^-eyed and amazed that, 
for the first time ever, a whole 
stme was his just for the asking. 

Weil, make that whatever he 
could buy for $50 — a king's ran- 
som to a second grader — that 
had been given to him through the 
Virginia Beach Jaycees' annual 
Christmas Straining Tour. 

Forty uncbrprivileged children, 
predominately from the F^incess 
Anne area and including several 
referred through the Mothers Inc. 
homeless ministry, gathered at 
the Lynnhaven Parkway Wal- 
Mart Saturday for a shopping 
spree the likes of which they had 
never seen. 

With shopping lisu clutched 
tightly in tlwir little hands — list- 
ing such things as "perfume for 
Mom" and "socks far I^kI" — the 
youngsters were paired with 
Jaycees buddies whose holiday 
season wouldn't be complete 
witiKNit this yevly rite. 

In its 13th )«ar, the shopping 
tour is one of the orpnization's 
traditional com-munity Krvice 
projects and one the most enjoy- 
able. The Jaycees rely on contri- 
buticms from kx»l busimsses and 
citizens to k^ die qxrit alive. 

'It's veiy str^rfui u) o^- 

nize," admitted a smiling Lc»i 
Ovstwli, event coH:lMif{^aon, u 



she talked loudly above the din of 
holiday shoppers crowding into 
the store. 

Stressful? Yes. But something 
she wants to give up doing? No. 

"It's a warm, fuzzy feeling," 
continued Overholt, who began 
coordinating the event in Novem- 
ber with co-chair Lisa Ferloin. "It 
just gives me a great deal of 
pleasure seeing the kids so ha^y 
about it and excited." 

Kevin Gaydosh, a chapter life 
member of the Virginia Beach 
Jaycees, stood looking like an 
expectant father as he waited tot 
his ^qjping iHKldy to show up. * 

"Normally, it's one of the fa- 
vorite projects that the ch^)ter 
does next to the ECSC (East 
Coast Surfing Championship). 
ECSC is very labor intensive om! 
1^^ place at a different time of 
year, but diis is our best Am thing 
to do and actually cme of cm best 
recruitment project. 

"And the kids have a better 
Christmas because of it. I 
wouldn't consider it Christmas 
without doing this. My favorite 
pan is watching the child go 
through the ptKess of what he'd 
like to get for others — ratho' 
than himself. That's what it's all 
about; the faces of the kids say it 
all." 

Many Virginia Beach Jaycees 
in i»a years «^e chwraed 1^ the 




35 Cents 



LuxfordPTA, 
volunteers 
team up; make 
kids' holiday 
extra special 

By MARGARET WINDLEY 
Sun CorrMpondent 

A volunteer-run store full of 
inexpensive, but nice, presents 
from which children could make 
some holiday purchases and i^ter- 
school language program run by 
volunieeis for interested studous. 

Pipe dieam or reality? It's reality 
at Luxfoid Elementary thanks to tte 
help of their dedio^ volunteers 
and staff. 

'If s something extra f(»- a child," 
said Nancy Eguia, one of the 
teachers who volunteered her time 
in the langus^ program, speaking 
of the importance of voluntarism in 
goieral in Ae schools. 

The volunteer store. Cherry 
Street Station, was run by the PTA 
for a week as a fund raiso-, service 
and educational tool, and the 
volunteer afterschool language 
progrun offoing German, French, 
and Spanish was run by a mother 
and two teachos tot six weeks on 
Kfoncfay aAetnooQS. 

It has been so popular that a 
second ^ssion is being pbmned. 

The store was a spare room 
turned into a f^ and filled with a 
selection (^ inocpensive presents 
from Winning Edgel for the 
youngstns to purchase as holiday 
gifts for family, friends or even 
themsdves. 

Pens, jewelry pouches, earrings, 
keyrings, sewing kits, cookbooks, 
crystal bells, ccMSters, telephone 
initexes. address books, dolls and 
similar toys and gifts — most with 
with price tags well under $5— 
filled the tops of several tables. The 
children walked slowly around 
viewing the presents, then 
considering, thinking, looking 
beion finally purchasing. 

PTA moms nwre busily assisting 
the young ladies and gentlemen 
with their selecticNis, stuffing the 
presents in attractive, col(»ful paper 
bags, stapling them shut for 
privacy aid changing the money the 
children handed to them in eager, 
little hands. 

DSm LUXFORD. Pag* 4 



B^ch-based CBN 
debuts holiday film 

Prodffixd and cre^ed half a world 
away in Shanghai, China by The 
Chr^tian Broadcasting Network, 
"Micah's Christmas Treasure" will 
make its television (tebut in the 
U.S. oa Dec. 22. 

With a potential of reaching 86 
millioa htmies aooss Amoica, diis 
one-hour animated film shares the 
story of Christmas through the eyes 
df a 12-year-dd boy named Micah. 

"Micah's Treasure" is also 
schMloted to us into'nationally in 
28aMintries. 

CBN has been using animation 
effectively overseas for years. lis 
animated Bible stories, "Super- 
book' tmd Tlying House," have 
been bandatod into 30 languages 
for bioadc« m 70 natkns reaching 
teas OF niUkNis of peofrte. 

'K&ah's Oviamas "nvaaffe" is 
m adventure about Micah, a pof^ 
sbepherd boy, and his sister, 
Rac^ who set out on a journey to 
Itad thctf fwtune. They follow a 
brilliant sttr to Bethlehem where 
th^ thiiric ikcir tteaaire awvts bitt, 
instewl. kttah finds a greator 
tr^wie than noney. 

'kficah's <^i^as Treasure" 
wiU be bmitcaft on die Pimlly 
Osmmd at 10 a.m. nd r^^ted u 
IOm>>«0«c.22. 



MBBMlMMHfl 



■■■ 



<^^ 



^m 



1 Vindaia Beach Sun. Friday. December 22^ 1995 



Commentary 



Merry Christmas to all 

The holiday season is a time of tradition — 
when families draw together, reaffirming well- 
loved customs and fundamental beliefs. The 
word "Christmas" brings to mind warm and 
wonderful memories, and deep, abiding 
hopes. 

In spite of the myriad of problems facing 
many people today, the Christmas spirit gives 
strength to us all. If we can but fashion the 
spirit of Christmas into a way of life — a 
direction in which we travel each day — a 
more peaceful world is possible. 

This is not a dream, but something that is 
within our reach. If we could apply 5ie same 
unselfishness, forgiveness and understanding 
that we feel at Christmas time to situations 
that arise within our dally lives at home, 
business world and In our communities 
throughout the year, we would be taking a 
great step toward making the spirit of 
Christmas a year-round Influence. 

Let us try to cany the fine attitudes we have 
at this season into our activities during the 
coming year. Our lives and the lives of those 
around is will be richer for this effort. 

May our holidajre be satisfying, and may you 
find the peace of mind and heart which lies 
within your reach. 

Holiday cancels war 

Editofs note: The following is based on an 
eye-witness account of an incident that 
occurred the day before Christmas at the 
Western Front during World War I: 

As if by some miracle, the shelling stopped 
and the mortar and rifle fire ceased. 

Only silence... 

But the stillness was broken by men of the 
North Staffordshire Regiment, who exchanged 
"words of good cheer" with the enemy. Men 
from Britain an^ Germany talked to one 
another across No Man's Land! 

A BrlUsh officer suggested a Volkslled (folk 
song). 

The Germans sang... 

Everyone agreed to a truce until midnight of 
Christmas Day. 

Both sides cut through the barbed wire and 
walked in each other's trenches, exchanging 
food and talking and photographing one 
another. 

Some Germans sang "Home Sweet Home" 
followed by a hymn. 

In another part of the trenches, some 
German soldiers left their positions to offer 
Christmas greetings to a group of Scots. An 
officer tried to stop them, but the German 
said, "But this Is Christmas..." 

No one would or could stop the brotherhood 
of Christmas. 

And at midnight, both Germans and Britons 
fired warning shots -as If to say. "Return to the 
trenches behind your own lines." 

Gradually, the business of trying to kill the 
enemy returned to normal. But the soldiers 
on both sides knew that Christmas is not a 
normal time. It can cancel out war — If only 
for a day. 



The one time 

"I have always thought of Christmas, when It 
has come 'round, as a good time; forgiving, 
charitable time; the only time I know of, in 
the long calendar of the year, when men and 
women seem by one consent to open their 
shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people 
below them as if they really were fellow 
passengers to the grave, and not another race 
of creatures bound on other Journeys. And so 
as Tiny Tim said: 'A Merry Christmas to us all, 
my dears. Good bless us, everyone.'" — 
Charles Dickens. 



HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN' 



n New Subscription Q Renewal 
meate rrmN this c^pon with your chtc* to: 
SUN, 138 S. RoMmorM Rd.. Vliglnit Beach, VA 23452 

RAT^: Within 40 mllM of Virginia BMch: 

□ One year $14.95 Q Two yean »e.50 
ElMwrhtrt in Virginia and North Carolina: 

Q] One year $18.85 []] TWo yeara $29.50 

All othar ttataa: 

□ One year $22.00 Q 1f^y«w $34.60 
Name m . 



Mdr^. 



\ 



CHy. 



State, 



ap. 



Letter to the editor 
Santa isn't a con^ with the whole Beach situation 



Editcv: 

The ftotii page of the Dec. 1 issue of The 
Virginia Beach 5im iHOvidna rather clear picture 
of the Viiginia Beach taxjwys's predicament. 

Hie taxpay^, symbolized by Santa, that jolly 
(dd elf who ev^ child (and councilper»m) ki»ws, 
has a bottomless bag of goodies, stands in the 
middle. 

To Santa's left is a sobering report of future 
funding prospects from the state and federal 
govanmotts — rediKtions. reductions. 

To Santa's right is a report on yet another of the 
never ending procession of do-good, feel-good, 
look-good deficit-running projects that flow in a 
never ending torrent from city cmuicil. This one is 
a park to commemorate and celebrate agriculture. 
Itll come upon us in three parts, each costing only 
a few million taxpayer dollars. 

When completed the projected annual deficit 
will be only $480,000! It will attract tourists. Might 



not the sune be accomptbhed a lot cheaper by 
bronzing some noted, super-annuated farmer 
(anyone want to make a nomination?) and 
mounting him on a pedestal next to the No-wegimi 
Lady? 

Boxing in Suta to die MMith is an item that 
starts out a^randizing Santa for his part in anotfier 
much needed project, the three-quarter-of>a- 
million-doUar "Holiday Lights at the Beach" 
project. Santa would rather the money have been 
used to pay cops <x left in the taxpayer's pocket. 
Tills whole business is beginning to make Santa 
uncomfortable and there's no way out but up. 
Luckily, he has Donner. Biitzen and company! Up, 
up and Away! 

John Q. Taxpayer has no such magic vehicle, al) 
he can do is eagerly iwtk the May elections. 
Dtmald E. Babcock 
South PEirliafflait Drive 
Virginia Beach 



A tale of two gentlemen-in- waiting 




CommonwtBlth 
Conmwitaiy 

By Ray Oct- 
land, columniit 



Pardon me for discussing an elec- 
tion almost two years distant to choose 
the next governor of Virginia. But I 
am hoist on the petard of having 
introduced last week the all-but- 
certain candidates: Republican 
Attorney General James Gilmore and 
Democratic Lt. Gov. Don Beyer. That 
they are still unknown quantities to 
most Virgin- 
ians requires 
us to go for- 
ward. 

It is. 
admittedly, 
h(»vy going. 
Neither man 
is famous for 
scintillation. 
While Oil- 
more has 
shown more 
bravado, 
both ve cau- 
tious plod- 
ders, asbefits 
those with 
ambitions 
yet to be 
realind. 

OUniOR, whose highest previmu 
office had been commonwealth's 
Bttoniey of Henrico County, began 
his temat as tiie state's highest legal 
officer on a bipartisan note, 
uinouncingdiatisivuelawyersdoing 
contract work for his office would be 
selected on tiie basis of merit. When 
Uwym were less flush tiian now, the 
state's business was eagerly sought, 
and political connections paramount 
in getting it. 

For decades before the election of 
Marshall Colanai, the state's first 
Rqniblican attorney goierel, only 
Demooats in good stuuUng needed 
to^^ly.CcdMnannndemanylasting 
enemies by diq)iacing all the old 
Domo(ntic lawyers, d^ending his 
action on grounds of the oldest 
princ^le in politics, "to the victor 
bdonp the spoUs." In unveiling his 
initial list of 17S lawyers who will 
dure fees ap|»oach^ $10 million a 
year, OUmore {»oudly noted tiut S3 



had so^ed his predecessor, Demooat 
Mary Sue Teny, 

A willingness to let the chips fall 
whoe they may has been a hallmark 
of Gilmore's fisttwo years asattomey 
g^ieral. 

If there is a Richmond culttue of 
affluence and influence, radiating 
from a nexus of old-line corporations 
imd the lawyers who serve them. Blue 
Cross of Virginia, now lYipm, is 
near the center. For years, it was 
somediing of a sacred cow, regarded 
by many as an entity of near-phi- 
lanthropic purpose. That ended, of 
course, v/hea medical costs went 

A Willingness to 

let the chips fall 

where they may 

has been a 

hallmark of 

Gilmore's first 

two years as 

attorney: 

through the roof and Trigon had to 
make fundamental changes in order 
to remain a player in a hotiy compe- 
titive industiy. 

When Irigon announced plans to 
become a public corpcnation, the 
attorney general's offke raised the 
s^ous question of who really owns 
theassets.Itsuggestedthestittediould 
receive a sizable stake in any new 
company as compensation for 
decades of prefnential tax status. 
Widi Trigon estimating its msket 
valueatbetweenSl billion and$1.7S 
billion.tiiesutte'sclaimforadiareof 
any new sKxk would start in die 
neighb<^hoodofitS6xistingnetworth 
of $67S million. 

The atttnney general's office has 
also been in tiie tiiick of the nuty 
controversy ova discounts medicd 
pro\iders gave Iripxi which weren't 
passed along to policyhol(to. who 



made largw co-pajmnents as a result 
While obviously unfair to those 
making claims, such discounts 
undoubtedly saved to reduce the 
price of premiums for all 
policyhol(ters. 

That there may be more tt> it can be 
found in a hard-hitting report on 
Trigon prepared in the attorney 
goieral's office and sulmitted to die 
State Corporation Commission. 
Based largely on confidential 
interviews wiUi Trigon employees, it 
said top managers "permitted a 
corporatecultureof callous disregard 
for die interests of individual patients 
uid consumers." 

My own view is that while Trigon 
has undoubtedly behaved as if 
occupying a privil^ed position, it 
has been forced to struggle witii 
revolutionary devek>pm«iis in me- 
dicine and intmsecompetitiontooffer 
large employers die lowest rate. In 
this envinmment, its hylvid status as 
anon-proflt acting in many ways like 
a for-profit cannot be sustained, 
though it would leem logical for die 
state to be cut a share of the stock if it 
goespubUc. 

OUmore recently made news — 
BiKi risked die ire of OOP consova- 
tivu — by ruling dut state law en- 
tities U.S. Sen. John Warner to seek 
die Republkwi nominatitm next yeiff 
inapimary.Oiven dwextremeclarity 
of the law, it's hard to see how he 
could have dont otiierwise. 

While Oilmore pointed die way 
for Oov. Oedrge Allen ' s winning stra- 
tegy of Mding "liberal, lenient" 
parole, and has been loyal to die 
governor's policy initiiUives, he has 
given lots of evidence d being his 
own man. Unlike seme previous 
occiqxuits of the office, he has also 
se«ned content Ki mind his knitting, 
avoiding the imi»«ssion of lusting 
opmly f(x the govemorsh^. 

One is templed to see Beyer as a 
kind of low-rent Chuck Robb— {80- 
peUedbyfiunilymon^lntodiehi^ 
reaches of staie politics, periupi ia 

□SeaAiMgaS 



Fm dreaming of a white Christmas 




OffThB 
Cuff 

By Victoria 
Htoht, tditor 



Bach year witiiout fail I hear the 
vari(Hi8 and sundry weatiier foecast- 
m (toclare dut "dtis is die year we're 
bi for die big one." 
Snow, that is, and lots oi it! 
After yean of unusually mild win- 
ters, I think 
tiiat— cross 
my fingers 
— diis is fi- 
nally the 
"winter of 
content." 
Butifycii're 
a snow hater, 
make tills die 
"winter of 
diK(»t^L" 
Getting 
dressed for 
work one 
fine morn- 
ing, I was 
enjoying my 
tt^ddieof 
Katie and 
Bryant on 
'Today" when tiiesaeei swiushedto 
aflunyofwMreaBuffalo.N.Y.dug 
(wt of a virnad bllzzsd. 

"And it's ^U more titn a wedc to 
ChriMml" die ^v«big NBC re- 
poter.bundledteicarfndevmuffs. 

Yei^ee, I thtaik thU ni^ very ^1 
be Vki^'a y» for ^ ^^ stuff. 

If moiKiiy im^ ni'caiti^y, 
1980 was (Mir liM "Ull» Mom" widi 
OK^gh nww to ck^ down school 
for (toys and fire^e the Qizdiedi 

tat ru never fttfet th« Aidic blast 
and to acomqMnybig {sec^itation. 

I had a new ^maa &m thai, die 
d^. (town-fflled ktad «4ti> fidce for 
trim aitnnd te hood dot WM ^)e- 
cially pc^wlar in tte '7(te and early 
'SQi. 

Mon bnOed ne qi ti^ I^Ung 
AeAawttfi^iOtettehooddoMd 
ip tij^t arouKi my foce nd only fl^ 



eyes, nose and moudi pedced out. 
Ttaa, allpj^g in die black, rubber 
galodiet widi metal latches diat I 
specially hated. I bounded off into 
die snow witii hands in red, fleecy 
mitttns duu I still have to Utis day. 

Andghboihoodcovoed infre^y- 
fallen snow is a wondrous dting to a 
10-year-old with a whole day off 
from school and an overabundant 
imagination. What to do first? The 
possibilities were endless. 

¥ot a while I piddted around the 
yard making a snowmui and check- 
ing out otv neighbor Kfr. Ookftilatt's 
snow-covoed car — until I learned 
dirough die grapevine tim teams 
were matching up for a killer snow- 
ball fnt fight at die Nid of die street. 

Not wantii^ to miss all die good 
action, my friend Autumn and I were 
soon put to wcnk making nns^ve 
"siow boulders" to forni the tgL 
After diat, we joined die ammunito 
team making dozens of hud-paclnd 
snowballs to lataich it dw tq^x^g 
fixces. Thai, it wn bombs awayl 

I was living a pretty good time, 
too, until a partkiidariy himloiw fhrni 
die odia team hit me squoe in die 
eye and I was down for die cwnt. 
"Wounded," I limped home for hot 
clKXcdate and a littie modierly love. 

As luck would hi^e it. Qad ^m 
g^ittg ready to p} out on "mow 
mission" and couki u» a bit of com- 
iwiy. Being a roofo', dioe wasn't 
much sense in openfaig Us Aop diat 
day — and I suspect he wanted to 
check (Nit die sites md see if die 
«K}WM(»m would Mng »iy pc^en- 

tialCMMIOl. 

OnMHng my iww bri)y doll I'd 
^ttoi for Quisttnas, IHd toM me to 
Ikv (HI die ^»-old stod tfuu we 1^ 
sbv^ in die died (Wt back. We wot 
(^ona^jimi^l 

T!m fire^ were still slick with tee 
and deet. so he }Mnd Us my ^• 
|^,UoektfteModt,utilwe««« 
at die Ttoee 01«t a»vml0Bee aura 
on Powfaaun Avoiue nee ODU. We 



turned onfo 48tii Strett and, tired of 
riding, I began to trudge alongside 
myfadw. 

We arrived near die intersection of 
48di and Hunpton Boulevard whoi 
dad noticed diat die two Quonset huts 
near die university's Foreman Field 
looked like two huge hiUs. Snow- 
drifts had accumulated against dion, 
making dieir side pofect for climb- 
ing, if not sledding. 

We sorted to maneuver up one 
when Dad decided diis might not be 
die snartest tiling he'd done. We 
rewmed our journey and trekked 
across Hampton Boulevard and into 
Budd^'sSupennaiket,whereDadand 
a feltow I jnenime was "Buddy" 
baded yarns tboat die weadia and 
bygtxie days. 

Afta a lingering Coca-Cola, Dad 
fished a Uttie "Brownie box" camora 
bom Ms poclret uid add we had 
pktiffes to Qdce. So around we turmd 
and headed iMck f» h(HTO. 

Along die way, D«l c^Mired the 
wintry scenes on fibn — pictiires I 
still treasure to diis day. 

There are die Quonsa huts to (me, 
and our snow-co^^r^ hCNise in an- 
other. AiK}dier Aowt die Bizabedi 
RivK so Croien ova dutt my brodwrs 
evoi ««nadacrossitto dieodiaside 
(not die wlsM move). CMiers diow 
icicles M tong as dagpnv huigii^ 
bom die gutten. Fuially, dioe's one 
of me, clutching my baby doll t^taut 
a heavy, cloudy sky and railing 
htMdly. 

Sure, we' ve httl mowt siiKe ttoi, 
but M)t (tf tiie ane m^iiti^ M die 
Wlnier of '80. Oeqritt all die maris it 
oettM — die aazytrafTic and school 
ckMings for st«Ms — I pny for dw 
flnt flike to fidl vMi many nwre ^a 
dw. 

L^kmow, letitsnow;teitmow. 
After an, I hen die foreoMers an 
myng IMs is die yevl" Jut one 
qnedon: (»n «« have b in time for a 
white Chfimnas? 




The Beat 
Wortd 

By B.J. Se§. 
aions, senior col- 
umniaL 



A Christmas 
wish for all 

As I sat contemplating a mbject for 
dus week's column. I dmight how 
nice it would be if I could write 
sonelU^ bright and cheerful tbtt 
wwddbecxMqwdblewididieMkiay 
sNVon. So many of my columns diis 
year have been negative; but, 
unfortimalelydiatisdiekindofworid 
we live in today. 

I can't 
pretend tiiat 
everydiingis 
beautiful 
whenitisnnt. 
And,Icannot 
write some 
optimistic 
liberal gar- 
bage that 
cane out of 
die moudi of 
Rodney 
King, that 
great Am- 
erican, when 
he said, "Ca- 
n't we all just 
^^^^^^^ getakmgfr 
"'~~'"^""'"~' For many 

Christmas is 
, not celebrated as die day of die birth 
of Jesus but rather as a reason to sell 
merchandise, get drunk, take dope 
and abuse each odia. 

Can you imagine what it was like 
when JosejA andMary were trying to 
find lodging on diat cold night in 
Bedilehem so may years ago? There 
was no place at die inn , so Uiey settled 
down in stable where Muy gave 
birdi to Jesus. If die same thing 
tappcatd today diey would pn^iably 
have been stoned and robbed and 
possibly murdered just for tiieir 
meaga possessions. 

It is quite possible tiiat Jesus might 
not have been bom. Now I know that 
is hard for some to swallow, but sadly 
it is true. 

How can I have die Christmas spirit 
when 20,000 and possibly more of 
our fine young men and womoi are in 
a hostile, frozen country where tiiey 
should not be? How can I have the 
Christinas spirit when our country is 
consumed wiUi hatred and drugs 
fiowing as free as die mr and where 
many diis Christmas will freeze to 
death or have no home to share widi 
relatives? 

How can I feel die Christmas spirit 
when I dUnk of Kate Phillips, an Sli-. 
year-old womm, who died sevoal 
yean ago because she had to make a 
choice between eating or paying a 
higher etoctric bill to keep cool widi 
air conditioning. She chose eitting 
and suffered a heatstroke whuh Ima 
caused a heart attack whi(^ took ha 
life. 

I'm sure some will say diat it's not 
possible in diis day and time, but it is 
ponible and some will be like Kate 
niillipsand have to decideon medical 
treaonent, k^ing warm, eating (x 
fieezlngtodeadi. 

Oh, my house will be warm uid 
diere will be jdenty of good food nd 
our children will be widi us uid kt 
diat we are grateful but until diere is 
a change in die world for die better I 
will neva be able to f(»set die plight 
of odien and c viy on wldi Chr^tinas 
as if tiiey didn't exist. 

Icm nevaftvget die sight t^diose 
litde children's bodies diat had been 
hacked to deadi widi machetes in 
RwandatH-diebomUnginOUahoma 
ordietaicinendonofdiemen,woniai 
and chikiren tt Waco. It has not been 
a voy good yev. Let's h(^ diat next 
year will be betta. Merry Christmas. 
Welcome to die real world. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

138 South RoMDOBt Road 

Sttttt2M 

VlrgliilaBmcli,Va.234S2 

T<teplKHM:904)4M.3430 

(USPSM0.140) 

PublWiMr 
HtauByafy 

EdttloralSiipflrviMr 

Jimie Brown 

Edttor 
ViotoritHMdil 

Compodtloa 
M.J. Knoblodc 



TiM ^^iflJa Beadi Sun it pub- 
U^adavwyAid^l^BynlyPuUtea- 
tioBS, Im., lOCK) Armory IMve, 
f^nlditt, Vii|inu2385 1 . SecoKiClaM 
poM|e paid in l^nklin. Virgtnii and 
■Mtksul enery ofllc«. Potanasttr: 
Sand addrea dim^ to 1000 Anmiiy 
Mva, Pnaidin. V^lida 23831. Siii>- 
toiptton Raiat: By mMi addnuM 
uddifai ¥i milM of Virgmia Baadi. 
Va., (me yen, $14.93, two yean, 
$26J0. Vk^idMnd Ilofdi Cootea. 
one y«e, $16,kS, two yem, $29.%. 
AH «h« itatai om year. $^.00, ti»e 
^Bi. ^ JO. P^^ite in advanoa. 

Odiar By«ly PiMie«in» aawa- 
pipan: Hie C hwi| ie a k e !H»t, Hm 
PofteiwuUi Timu, Hie Tklawatw 
H&wt, The BnnBwkklliMa-O^Hte. 
1^ te^MRdant Mmim^, lit 
tHa^M^ Moitor, Tha P a iwrtgg 
Meri t a . 



^^^^^ 



Virginia Beach Sun. Friday. Decembo- 22. 1995 3 





The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf 




PtaMbyCinl AmoW 

SANTA'S NELPBO. Napliif t* ipreN MnllM %» tmainH af Mc4y 
cbMna, VbfMi Icich ^ iiii pl >ye M gavt tbcir ttaw tmi tiletts 
to ircu 1,100 tcMy bean far MMiy ^rlbillM. Som af the 
falln wha mate tha pra|cct passfela, fraat frain left, Indated Kay 
Hayat, Jady Kaaaady, Dapaty Jaha Bartaa, Chris Nerwig, Debbie 
Calliaa aarf Shirley AAnm. Secant raw: Beverly Haakt, City 
Maaager Jamee K. Sparc, Depaty Jaha Geldtmith, Hciea Spare, 
Daw* FraaUia aad Shirley Cartwri^ 

Bears, bears everywhere! 

In 1989, a tradition was born at 
City Hall. Each year the Salvation 
Army brings teddy bears to the 
Municipal Center and any city em- 
ployee wishing to participate picks 
up one, two or as many bears as he or 
she wishes to dress from the 
Commissioner of Revenue's Office. 

They return 

thematalalo- 

day for 

judging and 

for pickup 

again by the 

salvation Ar- 
my for 

delivery to 

needy chil- 
dren in the 

Hampton 

Roads area. 
This year 

1,100 teddy 

bears were 

dressed by 

city em- 
ployees with 

the Sheriffs 

Department 

alone, dec- 
oratingmorethan 300. For two weeks 
the l(*by of City Hall was filled with 
thecutest, dressiestlittle bears you' ve 
ever seen. The space was filled widi 
laughter and "oohs" and "ahs" from 
visitors and employees alike as each 
viewed the bears. 

No matter how many times you 
went through the lobby there was 
always a bear that had been missed 
on your first visit These bears were 
dressed, with agreatdeal of creativity 
and imaginauon, to appeal to 
numerous occupations and a variety 
of interests. 

There were Army bears... pilot 
bears.. .doctor bears... Christmas 
bears...beach bum bears. There were 
mama bears, grandpa bears and lots 
of baby bears. There were cowboy 
bears. Indian bears, Santa bears, angel 
bears and bears that play 
football...some for the Redskins and 
some for Dallas. 

The entire U.S. Olympic summer 
team was suited-up. There were 
ballerina bears, a Superman bear, a 
mermaid bear, bears in strollers, in 
highchairs and in wagons. A judge 
and his jury were dressed tor the 
occasion and a bear Nativity scene 
was complete with bam animals. 

Each yeat the bears are judged for 
"Beary Best Dressed Bear," "Best 
Holidays Dressed Bear." "Most 
Huggable Bear." "Best Theme" and 
"Most Creative Bear." Can you 
imagine the hard job that would be? 
A special thanksgoes to Kay Hayes. 
Commissioner of Revenue's Office, 
for coordinating this (»oject for the 
past several years. This year, in fact, 
Kay did something that has not been 
done fa some time and that was to 



NO HO NO! "BEAR-Y 
CNRISTMASr Depaty Jaha 
GaldsfflKh m»i9 a waaderfal 
Saata n ha came "bearlai" the 
gift af teMys to be placed at CNy 
Nail. The Christmas tree was 
danated by Ulttaa Yemen Corp. 

hold a reception honoring the bears 
and offering the public a chance to 
come by and view this most unique 
collection of dressed bears. 

The reception was held on Dec. 10 
and the foyer of the City Hall build- 
ing was opened so that the spectacu- 
lar bear show could be shared with 
any who wished to view it. The lobby 
always has a tree, decorated with 
many beautiful ornaments sent each 
year from the Lillian Vernon Com- 
pany. The bears surrounded this tree, 
as well as forming a giant bear tree in 
the very center of the lobby and ar- 
ranged on bleachers all around the 
walls. 

Stands were built in any available 
space to hold the bears. Santa was on 
hand to greet all visitcx'S on this q)ecial 
reception day, handing out smiles, 
hugs and candy canes. Punch and 
cookies were also served. The turn- 
out was good and all who came left 
with a smile and a beary special 
feeling. 

The bears were collected by the 
Salvation Army on Dec. 12. The 
distribution to families throughout 
the Hampton Roads area began 
Monday. Dec. 18. The Salvation 
Army will help approximately 3.200 
families this year and distribute toys 
and clothing to about 8,000children. 

Haj^y holidays, everyone! May 
your holiday season be merry and 
bright and may each and every one 
have many h^py returns. 



A tale of Virginia's two 
gentlemen-in-waiting 



G Continued From Page 2 

prq)aration for Ktme future role in 
the really big show across the 
Potomac. There is a similar 
vagueness: conservative rhetoric for 
the Rotary alternating with obvious 
liberal ploys, such as championing 
the "motor- vaer" law that President 
Bill Clinton got passed and Allen 
tried unsuccessfully to derail. Of 
course, any Virginia Democrat with 
statewide ambitions is obliged to 
ttAofpt a similar zig-zag course, 

B^v'soMisbtidionaUyprracribed 
rok of presiding ovo' the state Senate 
simply doesn't offer the scope for 
actkm fmmd in the attorney genial 's 
o^e, whfch can be a blessing. 
Attonieys gttmal coltetX oianies 
while Iteuttnant govenKHS seltkxn 
da. 

If Bej^- has n« c(rflected the de- 



dicated suiipxt that bound Democrats 
to the likes of the sainted Rc^b, they 
now see no alternative to him. 
Regardless of his lack of charisma or 
experience, he has given every 
indication of being a t^un player, 
willing to deferto these whose arrival 
in Richmond long |»eceded his own. 
If good breeding means being self- 
effacing. Beyer certainly has it. 

A Beyer-Gilmore contest will 
make for a dull {wess. But the issue 
dividing them will be simple: Whe- 
ther to continue die hsd-right indi 
Allen has charted or go back to the 
cozier days of the last Northern 
Virginia IXimociat who saw the nM 
to Washington leading through 
Riclunondmd uj^tas few a|^l^:arts 
as possible. 

Ray Garlami. a former ma^rof 
theVirginiaassetfd>(y,isasyndkated 
c(Aimoust. 



Up close and personal 

iPat (JruiU^: !Bea% Ll^± axs. a jisvik of {As hods 



By VICTORIA HECHT 
Sim E<fltor 

If a child — (R' adult for that matter — is 
lucky enough, she will find one of Pat 
Hurley's lovingly-created teddy bears under 
the tree Christmas morning. And if that 
adorable, furry face brings a smile and 
gleam to the eye. Hurley wiU know she has 
done her job well. 

In this artist's careful hands, mohair fabric 
becomes teddy's soft coat perfect for a little 
cheek to nuzde. Supple leather makes For a 
tiny i»w to grasp, and stuffing gives him a 
pudgy tummy just right for poking. 

At last, another teddy is bom! Soon he 
will go out into the world on an important 
mission: to sinead sunshine to whomevo' he 
encounters. Of the teddy's new parents. 
Hurley asks just one thing: that he goes to a 
good home soul makes others happy. 

A teddy bear artist for more than 16 years, 
the Virginia Beach resident has seen to it 
that her "children" join the countless legions 
of other teddy bears around the world as they 
offer comfort and love, joy and hugs. To 
Hurley, her bears aren't just created; they're 
bom from a mother's loving hands. 

"Bears speak to everyone's heart." she 
said. "They grab people's hearts and make 
them smile. What better way to spend your 
life than making people smile? They'll help 
you through good times and bad times — 
and never tell anybody a secret that you tell 
them. They wrap themselves around you and 
hug you back." 

A nip to Hurley's spacious Red Mill South 
home is a cheerful adventure. Bears, bears, 
everywhere! From the teddy s sitting in a 
wooden wagon to greet visitors at the front 
door to those reclining comfortably in a 
satin-covered wing chair, one gets the 
immediate impression that the stuffed toys 
are much more than that to their creator. 
They are part of the family. 
Hurley urges guests to "get to know the 
bears" and encourages plenty of hugs and 
squeezes. In turn, she watches the scene 
with a warm, maternal eye. She is also 
quick to extol her "children's" virtues as 
adults lose themselves in memories of 
bygone days. 

"There are a lot of therapists who use 
bears in therapy, both physical and 
emotional. They've also been used in speech 
therapy. I^lice officers use them in dealing 
with children, and even adults in some 
cases. Our mayor, Meyera Obemdorf. even 
has a bear collection, so that proves what a 
good person she is!" 

To Hurley, "bearing" a bear — the process 
of conceiving a teddy in the imagination and 
then making it a reality — takes as much 
love and nurturing as an expectant mother 
spends in anticipation of her newborn. 

"It starts with a vision in the mind. " she 
explained. 

"For instance, a couple of summers ago I 
was walking on the boardwalk when I saw a 
mother with her baby down in the sand on 
the blanket. The mother put her toddler 
down. She sat down as babies do with their 
, legs straddled and her body kind of dumpy. 

"Then she stuck her thumb in her mouth 
and held her blanket to her cheek; she was 
wearing a little sunsuit. I just went, 'Oh, 
Lord, is that a picture!' I came home with 
the idea and made a little bear like that in 
her sunsuit with a bow in her hair and 
holding a stuffed kitty." 

Making a bear from start to finish depends 
on how complicated the design, but a basic, 
"naked" bear will take about five hours. 

"A lot of it depends on how the artist 
interprets the pieces and the pattern. The 
mood of the artist is important, too. I could 
give five different people the pattern and get 
five very different bears back." 

Sometimes, Hurley begins one with no 
real concept of what his personality will be 
like. Others, howeva, are another story. 

"You get to know your bears while they're 
being bom. Some ae v«y mischievous; you 
can just tell that this is going to be the oite 
who keeps jumping off the shelf and not 
cooperate. Hien some are really sweet uid 
innocent; they're the hard ones to give up 
and find good homes for. 

"Each bear is an individual; the fur is 
there, and the bear is tltere just waiting to be 
bcHn. My job as the bear artist is to help that 
bear come out, be bom and interpret it — 




"You get to know your 
bears while they're 
being born. Some 

are very mischievous; 
you can Just tell that 
this is going to be 
the one who l^eeps r 

jumping off the shelf 
and not cooperate. 

Then some are really 

sweet and innocent; 

they're the hard ones 
to give up and find 
good homes for. " 



MMmky, 
beir$raa 



work its face out. Sometimes a nose can 
take days to get right. Sometimes a bear will 
sit there for a while before you know who a 
bear is and how to dress it." 

Although Hurley doesn't have a favorite 
bear — just as a good mother shouldn't have 
a favorite child — she does want all her 
bears "to be happy because the worid needs 
HKne smiles." 

Locally, Hurley's bears can be viewed at 
"Grannie and Me" inside the Countryside 
Shops at the Virginia Beach Farmer's Market. 
They are also shipped all over the United 
States and the world. 

Name: Pat Hurley. 

Wlut bromht you to this area: 

My husband was in the U.S. Navy. 



Hometown: Chicopee, Mass. 

Blrthdate: 1951. 

Occupation: Wife, mother and bear 
artist. 

Blarltal Status: Married. 

Children: Kate, 19, attends 
Randolph-Macon Women's College, and 
Kerry, 15, attends Kellam High School. 

Favorite movie: "The Quiet Man, 
"Steel Magnolias" and "Apollo 13." 

Magazines I regularly read: 

Teddy Bears and friends, Southern 
Living, Time and Reader's Digest. 

Favorite author: Dick Frances, 
Colleen McGullough and James 
Mitchner. 

Favorite night out on the town: 

Actually, it's not really a night out; it's a 
night in the sewing room stitching bears 
and watching a movie. 

Favorite restaurant: I just don't go 
out to eat that much, and my husband 
and I are very critical of food. But the 
last place we went was Lynnhaven Fish 
House, and it was very good. 



Favorite meal: 

potatoes and peas. 



Fresh salmon. 




What most people don't ^now 
abput me: I'm pretty much an open 
book. 

Best thing about myself: I like to 
give. 

Pets: Two cats: Midnite and Cassie. 

Hobbles: Gardening, sewing and 
sewing! 

Ideal vacation: The first place I 
would like to see would be Switzerland, 
then I'd travel all over the Pacific 
Northwest. 

Pet peeve: Rude people! 

First Job: Working in the office of an 
upholstery shop. 

Favorite sports teams: None. 

Favorite musicians: I like alnx>st ali 
types of musK, except rap. 

If I received $1 million: I'd pay 

my bills, put money asWe for college for 
the kids, pay off my parents' house ani 
make sure they were well off, and then 
my husband and I would enjoy 
ourseh/es. 

If I had 10 nUnntes on natiimal 
television: I'd gm my 10 mimites to 
Jim Kincaid (Channel 13 news) l>ecause 
he makes people smile. 



■■■■ 



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4 VifBJBla Beach Sun. PHdav. December 22. 1995 



6each couple shares special ministry with Chinese population 



Once missionaries, they now put talents to use liere 



ESJ 



By VCTORIA HECHT 
SunEdttDT 

Being in • new country fir 
iwty fh»i yow hnnelmd, {Mitic- 
uitfly diaing dw hoUdayi. can be 
an eqwdally kNiely time. 

But one local couple who has 
been in that boat understand the 
liuittkm well. 

Through thdr cmtinulng min- 
istry at First Chinese Baptist 
Church in Virginia Beach, Pastor 
Brian McDonald and his wife, 
Kathy, help make the transition 
easier for new Americans settling 
in the area, as well as those 
whose families have b^n attend- 
ing tte church for generations. 

On any given Sunday, First 
Chinese Baptist will draw a con- 
gregation of ISO to 20O. 

High school sweethearts and 
natives of Mobile, Ala., the cou- 
ple first toyed with the idea of 
becoming missionaries while 
attending Liberty University, It 
was while Brian was serving as 
youth pastOT that they knew their 
calling was TaiwM. 

"We were there for about 7 
1/2 years," Brian recalled, noting 
that their children, just pre- 
schoolers at the time, spent a 



good portion of dieir life learning 
the country's cusunns. 

It was while ui a oie-year fkir- 
lough in Virginia that the Mc- 
Dmialds leariMd of Fint Qiimse 
Bapdst Church uid iu need for a 
minister. Both fluent in Manduin 
Chinese, Brian preached a couple 
of services uid, iqxm the congre- 
gad<M>'s request, decided to stay. 

Offering two so^ices on Sun- 
day — one in English and the 
otha in Chinese — the McDon- 
alds have been ministering the 
Hampton Roads' Qiineie popula- 
tion f<v 2 1/2 years. 

"It was one thing to learn to 
converse in Chinese, but anoihw 
to preach and teach!" Brian 
laughed. 

Kathy, Adult Basic Educa- 
don/OED co<»^]inator at the Vir- 
ginia Beach Adult Learning Cen- 
ter, explaiwd why they w«e up 
f(»- the cittllenge. 

"A large percenuge of the 
world's peculation, actually about 
one-quarter, is Chinese and seems 
to be a very tmreached popula- 
tion. Through contacts that Brian 
and I had in high school and col- 
lege getting to know some Chi- 
nese people, it really increased 
our interest in dtem. And we bott 




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Iwralii CMltr. Kithy wtrin tlMri, while Mil li ptittr ff Hrat 
ChhMM kptM CNreh. 



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wanted to do loiMthing unique 
with grett prnpoae." 

Just It the McDonalds' 
three children — Daniel, Mar- 
garet and Brian Jr. -^ grew up 
learning uiotber culture, Brian 
and Kathy found ttelr itovotion 
growing as missltmaries U) the 
Chinese 

Altho^ they arm't necessvlly 
consid«ed "miisifmariei" h«e m 
home sdl, often dwy feel like it. 
"In some ways yn are (almost 
missionaries), because we are 
reaching a cotain ^hnlc md cul- 
tural group Qi people, so we haye 
to try and understand their cus- 
toms and ways of doing diin^. 
But a lot of people don't realize 
that in this Hampton Roads uea 
there are quite a few Chinese 
people — about S.OOO to 7,000," 
said Brian. 

Kathy was quick to note that 
First Chinese Baptist s«ves fami- 
lies flrom as far away as ^uo- 
son, Suffolk and Hunpton. There 
is also a sistw church diat First 
Chinese helped founded in six 
years ago. 

Althot^h her work at the Adult 
Learning Center is a full-time Job, 
Kathy considers being the pastor's 
wife another fulfilling job in itself. 
"In the Chinese culture. I find it 
interesting that die minister's wife 
has more of a pmiticm of promi- 
nence — and even a special tide 
— not found here in the Am^can 
culture. That gives me a sense of 
purp(»e in what I do ken support- 
ing Brian. 

"But I think that specifically 
with the chiavh, I e^joy woridng 
widi the children and having an 
active role in summer Vacation 
Bible School and those type of 
acdvides." 

Her hud)and «^oys die oppor- 
tunity his ministry provides to put 
his Chineae-qwdchig ddlls to use. 
"When we were missionaries 
and learned Chinese, it was a 
surprise to me that it was some- 
thing I was able to do real well. It 
is a very difficult language diat 
some people struggle widi. I tt^ 
being able to be in this unique 
position of serving the church. 
"They really needed a pasttv who 
could speak both English and 
Chinese." 

The McDonalds' mastery of flie 
Chinese language has made 
reaching out to their congregation 
much easier. 

"The English-speaking, or 
American-born Chinese, are 
pretty much Americanized. Of 
courM, die older ones are immi- 
grants and die fact diat Fve bera 
to dieir country and speak diek 
language helps them accept me. 
But the American-bom Chinese 
feel like I understand diem be- 
cause I grew up ui Am^ca. I feel 
like Fm in a unique placv where I 
can use my abilitiM in a needed 
way." 

Often die McDonalds are able 
to help families bridge die gener- 
ation gap between older and 
younger members of the congre- 
gadrai. 

"Many of the ol(te' graeration's 
children are exposed to things 
diey (older merab^s) really don't 
undnsttnd. lliey (Uie AmWican- 
bom Chinese) come home from 
school talking about diis and diat, 
and die parents haven't got a clue 




MNhOMNS TO INI CNMIM COMMUNnY. With M MtUllMei Mnitttoa tf B,tOO to 7,100 ChlMtt 
ni ChiMMW^miftaa riiMMli hi lliniptoe Wtai», Mn ml IMhy McDmiM mtaHter to ahMt 110 
people ooeh MunUf at Hrat Chhioso liptM Chirah hi VhfMi loach. 



what it all means. They feel a 
little bit threatened or uncertain. 
Plus, die children growing up in 
America tend to express 
diemselves in Amoican ways." 

Brian has even (teveloped a 
seminar. "Understanding Your 
ABCs (American-Born Chil- 
dren)," which he has presented in 
New Yoric uid Washingtcm, D.C. 

The McDomlds' efforts 

to swve Hampton Roads' Oilnae 
community do not end dine. Re- 
cendy, they had die opportunity 
to organize a visit for three 
teachers from Mainland China to 
die Adult Learning Ctatet. 

Ren Zhongtag, Yunhai Fang 
and Kuang Mengfo are visiting 
scholars at Old Dominim Univn- 
sity whom Brian met while pay- 
ing a trip to die campus. 

"I was actually over at ODU 
visiting widi some Chiatit stu- 
dents when I overheard these 
people speaking Chinese while 
we walked down die sitewalk. I 
introduced myself and found out 
diey were just moving in. Of 
couise, diey were swprisied tt) sm , 
a non-Chinese person who could 
speak Chinese." 

Brian told them about the 
church and his wife's job. Being 
teachers themselves, they were 
interested in exploring die educa- 
donal facility. 

"They basically wanted to learn 
about {American education and 
experience it finit-hand so that 
tiiey could make comparisons," 
Kadiy said. "They were especially 
interested in the adult education 
aspect because Uiat's somediing 
diey just (k}n't have over there — 
GED-typc prc^^am.' 

The duee visiting scholars were 
treated to a tour by Adult 
Learning Center Principal Bonnie 
Mizenko, English as a Second 
Language Coordinator Margaret 
Ki»tian and Kadiy. 

First Chinese Baptist Church of 
Virginia Beach is located 228 
Pritchard Rd. For more ittforma- 
tion on sernces, call 340-6069. 



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ChHNto UptM Charoh of VtrglBla loaeh, ba^oa eoagraotMa 
mombirjoanlB. 



Local city clerk earns another 
professional distinction, honor 



Rudi Hodges Smidi, city clerk 
of Virginia Beach, has become 
die 41st municipal clerk to be 
accepted into the diird sustaining 
membership of the IIMC 
Academy for Advanced 
Education. 

The academy was inaugurated 
in 1981 to further professional 
education and enhance the 
perfcHn^nce of today's municipal 
cl«k. All academy members must 
demonstrate that they have 
actively pursued education and 
professional acidifiers and have 
remained informed of current 
events in local government 

Academy points are earned 
through completing IIMC- 
recognized academy programs, 
attending professional seminars 
and workshops, teaching or 
writing in the profession, 
participating in professional 
meeting s and conferences and 
being recognized for unusual 
accomplishments. 

To date, approximately 10 
percent of the International 
Institute of Municipal Clerks' 
10,000 members have qualified 
for the AcKlemy staois. 

IIMC President Tom G. 
Roberts, city clerk of Kansas 
City, Kansas, announced, "I am 
deeply honeyed to announces Mra. 
Smith's entry in to the diird 
sustaining phase of the Academy 
for Advanced Education. It 
symbolized her status as a true 
Muntcii»l Cleik professional." 

Smith has Iwen employe! widi 
die city of Virginia Beach since 
November 1978. She achieved 
IIMC's Certified Municipal Clerk 
status in 1982, and ent^ed into 
die IIMC Acttlemy f« AdvuKed 
Education Program in March 
1983. She has cmtinued to fulfill 
die educational and professional 
service requirements during eKh 
of her Sustaining Memberships in 
die Academy. 




CAIX TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4B71 



Ruth Smith 

Since its inception, Smidi has 
attended and completed 
Advanced Academy Programs 
sponsored through the program in 
Liberal Arts Continuing 
Education, Old dominion 
University Norfolk, Advanced 
Advanced Academy Seminars 
offered by the International 
Institute of Municipal, Clerks and 
other professionally-related 
governmental courses. 

She maintains active 
professional and civic 
membership with the Virginia 
Municipal Clerks Association, the 
Tidewater Virginia Development 
Council, die Westminster Chapter 
of die Order of die Eastern Star, 
Business Women's Organization, 
Hospice and Samaritan House. 

Roberts praised Smith's 
Kcomplishments. 

"She has been a member of die 
International Institute of 
Muntoii»l Clerks for 16 years and 
cuTTNidy is a member of die IIMC 
International Relations 
CommittM. She is a past member 
of the IIMC Board of Direcu>rs 
(1986-1989). and has served or 
chaired a number of IIMC 
Cmimitiees, including Academy, 
Education, goals. International, 
Meeting Administration and 
Pwliamentary Law. Her personal 
Commiunent and service to the 
Municipal Clerk's field is at the 
Iwait of true professionals." 



"""^ 



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iwmpPVP<^^?^4-# -v-'t-'Jr^^^^f^mmmmmmmmmmmmim^mmmi^mmmmmmmm^mmmmmi 



mm^^m' 



Virginia Beac h Sun. Pridayi December 22, 199S S 



Luxford students' holidays made brighter by dedicated volunteers 



ContbuMd From Paga 1 

Adam Gibbs, a seoHid gfa^ who 
was nudcing a purchase with his 
mother, Stephanie, also a 
volimteer, was all amies.' 

"You are able to buy stuff for 
your family, and it's a lot cheqjo', 
and it's really fun," he said. "You 
can go around the tables, and you 
can buy stuff for your family, and 
you g^ to puk out the stuff." 

Stephanie Pickerell, a second 
gfada was just browsing. 

"rm lacHdng for a present for my 
brother. I think he'd like those," she 
said, indicating a card with a green 
man anned with a green parachute. 
She enjoyed the difficulty of 
making her decision in a room so 
"■uU of such good buys. 

"They got a lot of stuff," she 
summed up. 

"*9 



Jesslyn Bruegfenmann, a PTA 
volunteer, was rathusiastic about 
the gifts for sale through the 
pr(^iam and n<Hed its p<q)ularity, 
which was such Uiat they had 
alre»Iy needed refills afto' only two 
days (» the jcrt}. 

"We have boxes imd» the obte, 
and we cm rq)lenish them. We ran 
out of things yesterday, and they 
had to bring in more thbi^." 

Lesley Rook, PTA vice 
prudent, a volunt^r at the store, 
explained the reason for the low 
costs. The PTA store was charging 
only 5 percent to 10 percent over 
the cost 

"So that the children couM oijoy 
it, ncM to make money, but f(x their 
enjoyment. It teaches them math 
skills fflid mamy managonent, md 
ifs a s«vice. Now Kfom doesn't 




MVAUiABLE NOP. InfoN ilMMaia^ SchMi b a tkMug mm^ 
•f wint |Mi dtlzcm cm 4» whM tiny Im4 a Im4 to UaaiUm. 
fiabritl Patmliirit, left, It a vtiaatocr ecrmaa teachar, while 
Naacy M«la ■• • valmtMr SpaaM taadwr. 



have to worry about dragging them 
to die store. Hk kids enjoy it and 
so do die voluntens." 

She aMed diat the b^ in which 
the PTA Mnns were placing the 
gifts resonbled wrapping paper md 
w«e being stapled shut in an 
aitraciive momer sodiat they couU 
be placed under Christmas trees 
without distubing the wiaiqnng. 

Julie Airowood, a volunteer 
accepting and changing money, 
explained, "That way they don't 
kwjw what they wx getting. Except 
for th(Me who ue volunteers." She 

admitted that she bad had to hide die 
day before when her own children 
came to buy firom die su«t. 

Ro(dc adikd diat any money raised 
in die program would probably go 
to "put some more money in our 
Beware of Drugs Program. They 
bode quite a few {sograms dirough 
the year for die children like die 
Whappadoodle Puppets. It's just 
(Hie (rf die goieral fund rmsers." 

Bu,t in r^tition, volunteering is 
a mighty powo-. 

Ensconced in a chair in the 
litvary sat Gabrielle Pagenhardt, a 
volunteer Goman teacher. 

"I am only a modier," she said 
widi a crisp German accent, 
explaining that her greatest 
credential was her bilingual status 
as a native of the land of 
Oktoberfest. Heine and GoeUie. 

"It was quite amazing how many 
kids were interested in it. The 
classes were fully booked. My goal 
is to bring die whole world to die 
children, teach them about the 



customs, geogn^hy. the whole 
cuUiae." 

As a result of her experiences 
with teaching German to the 
youngsters, she was considering 
returning to school to become a 
German teacher. 

Eguia, who volunteered her time 
to teach Spanish, is «nploy^ as a 
qiecial education teacher A Luxfod. 
She conceived of die idea as a sort 
of f(Heign language club and went 
to die principal of Luxford for 
permission to set it up. After 
reouiting others, she came up widi 
a simple series of objatives geared 
to their ages. 

"We began with teaching diem 
basic greetings," she said. "Then we 
did colors and foods. It was just 
basic exposure to different 
languages. Each group would meet 
for an hour after school." 

"The time to teach a language is 
now, not when diey hit high school 
or middle school. All over die 
worid diey do it this way," said 
Eguia, a native of Bolivia widi an 
American modier. "I learned my 
English in pre-kindergarten. 
Everything around me was in 
Spanish. It was in pre-kindergarten 
diat I learned how to speak fluent 
English." 

The day before diey had celeteated 
die end of the language sessions 
with a schoolwide Language Fair. 

"Yesterday was our big 
culminating activities," she smiled. 
"We made cookbooks. We had 
German and Spanish and French 
foods. The kids had costumes." 




Photos by MargarM Windley 

CHRKIMAS SNOPPme AT SCHOOl? Yes, that's cwrect! Thanks to 
aevaied valaatctra, yaaaptcre like Adam 6lbb« were able te da 
tame lacipeaalvc Chrittmas ahappiag far his family. Hit 
Sataa, caoM alaag to hel^ 



Hampton Roads on the Move 



Twiford's Funeral Homes honored 
by National Selected Morticians 



Twiford's Funeral Homes, with 
a chapel location in Great Bridge, 
was recenUy honored during die 
78di Annual Meeting of National 
Selected Morticians, held at die 
Grand Hyatt, Washington. D.C. 

"Membership in National 
Selected Morticians is by 
invitation. And, NSM proudly 
recognizes Twiford Fwi»al 
Home, which was invited into 
NSM membership in 1945," 
stated NSM President Edward J. 
Keohane, of Quincy, Mass. 

'.'We commend this firm for 
more than half a century of 
continuous membership in NSM, 
for adherence to die NSM Code 



of Good Funeral Practice and fai 
dedicated service to their 
community," Kediane added. 

The special recognition 
ceremony for Twiford's Funeral 
Homes was attended by more 
dian 500 NSM members. The 
firm received a certificate 
commemorating theevoitand for 
their SO years of m em b ori i lp Tii 
NSM. 

NSM is an international 
association of more than 950 
inctependent funeral service firms 
within die continental United 
States and Canada as well as 14 
countries dffoughout die wald. 



Keith Denslow, Teddy Black, John W. Brown 

John W. Brown & Keith Denslow are 
pleased to announce Teddy Black has 

joined them in the practice of law. 

Teddy, a South Norfolk native, brings 

with him vast experience in criminal 

matters in the Tidewater area. 

John W. Brown, P.C. 

ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW 

Personal Injury - Wrongful E>eath - Criminal Defense - 

Traffic Charges 



M 



iilions collected in personal iiyury and 
wrongful death claims since 1986. 



John W. Brown, a former prosecutor, has for 

over 20 years i^rved the people of Chesapeake 

in the practice of law. 



FREE CONSULTATION 
CALL 547-5000 TODAY 

411 Cedar Rd. Chesapeake, VA. 23320 



Local OB/Gyn discusses bacterial infections 
and other causes of discomfort for women 




By PETER J. KEMP 
OB/Gyn 

Hie most common type of 
vaginal infection is bacterial 
vaginosis. Women with symptoms 
umally have increased mUk-like or 
grayish discharge with a hallmark 
of an unpleasant or foul odor. The 
most common complaint is a foul 
at ^y smeUy type of vaginal 
odor. TTiis is more common after 
intercourse. Some women also 
complain of an excessive white or 
grayish discharge that stains 
underclothes. These can can 
sometimes cause inflammation of 
the vagina, resulting in symptoms 
of itching and irritation when it is 
untreated. 

Hie cause of this infection is an 
overgrowth of the ncmnal bacteria 
that reside in the vagina. This 
seems to be more frequent in 
women with multiple sexual 
{mtners ot a new sexual partner. It 
rarely occurs in w(»nen who are not 
sexually active. 

A physician diagnosed this 
condition by taking a look at the 
appearance and color of vaginal 
secretions. The vaginal ph can be 
tested to see if it is different than 
normal vaginal secretions. A small 
amount of discharge is placed on a 
microscopic slide, added to normal 
saline and examined under 
magnification. This will reveal 
abnormal vaginal cells, called clue 
cells, which will reveal the csast of 



the vaginal discharge. Occasionally 
a pap smear will reveal these 
abnormal cells as well. 

If bacterial vaginosis is left 
untreated complications may occur. 
Primarily the most serious 
problems with vaginal discharge are 
that an undiagnosed sexually 
transmitted disease may also be 
present and/or pelvic inflammatory 
disease could also develop. This is a 
severe pelvic infection that could 
damage the fallopian tubes and 
ovaries, which may result in 
ect(^ic pregnancy if not treated 
early in the disease. There has been 
some indication that bacterial 
vaginosis in pregnancy leads to 
intra-uterine infections, which could 
potentially harm the {x^egnancy. 

Bacterial vaginosis is most 
widely treated with medication 
called metronidazol which can be 
administered by oral tablets or 
intravaginal cream. This medication 
can be taken in the second and third 
trimesta- of pregnancy or any time 
when a woman is not pregnant. 
Over the counter products like 
douches and sprays will not treat 
bacterial vaginosis, and should not 
be used witit'n a day or two prior to 
seeing a physician for this 
ccmdition. 

In the past, bacterial vaginosis 
has been considered a sexually 
transmitted disease, but that is not 




the current thinking in medicine. 
Your sexual parmer does not need 
to be treated unless the condition is 
recurrent. A screening test for other 
sexually transmitted diseases is 
usually performed at the same time 
bacterial vaginosis is detected. 

Like yeast infections and colds, 
women can experience recurrence 
infections with bacterial vaginosis. 
At this time, medical science has 
not identified the reasons for the 
recurrence or relapses of this 
disorder. To help minimize the risk 
of vaginitis of any type, and 
specifically vaginosis, good vaginal 
hygiene is required. This includes 
avoiding douching and using 
irritating agents like harsh soaps 
and feminine hygiene sprays, which 
disrupt the normal balance of the 
b^terial organisms. Women should 
also avoid spreading bacteria firom 
the rectum to the vagina by wiping 
from front to back after having 
bowel movements to avoid 
contamination of the vagina. 
Women should also wear loose 
fitting clothes and not tight-fitting 
pantyhose without cotton linos, or 
other clothes that can trap moisture 
in the vaginal area. 

If you think you have a vaginal 
infection that persists after 
treatment with over-the-counter 
medications, has a strong odor or 
are concerned about a sexual 
transmitted disorder, see you 
physician as soon as possible. 

Kemp is an OB/Gyn practicing in 
Chesapeake. 



Local pediatrician 
Krebs joins Sentara 

Sentara Health System has 
announced that Dr. Gary L. Krebs, 
a pediatrician, is practicing at the 
Sentara Health Care Center in 
Chesapeake. The Center is located 
at 910 Great Bridge Blvd.. Suite 
101. 

Krebs 
earned his 
medical 
degree 
firom Tem- 
ple Uni- 
versity 
Medical 
School in 
Philadel- 
phia. He 
completed 
his res- 
idency at Portsmouth Naval 
Hospi^. 

Krebs is board certified by the 
American Board of Pediatrics and 
formerly practiced at the Sentara 
Health Care Center in Kempsville. 




Krebs 



Hampton Roads on the 
Move Deadlines: 

News deadline is Wednesdays at noon 
for publication in the next weel<'s 
newspaptfs. Advertising deadline is 
Tuesday at 2 p.m. for publication in ^at 
week's issues. This section is published 
every Fridaqr in The Virginia Beach Sun, 
The Chesapeake Post and The 
Portsmouth Times. Send all materials, 
inchKRng name and telephone number 
to: Hampton Roads on the Move, c/o 
The Chetapaake Post,l024 N. 
BMMMd Blvd., Chesapeake, Va. 
23320, or tato54»O390. 




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AFTER 7 p.m. CALL 1-800-54' Aulo c 

ASK FOR HHILTON DeLOATt f"" ' 



Steven B. Powers, M.D. 

Board Certified OB/GYN 

Peter J. Kemp, M,D, 
Susan Preston, N.P. 

Obstetrics i. Gynecology 

We are pleased to announce the 
assumption of patient care for 
Gad E. Brosch, M.D. 

and continued care of his patient. 

Providing Family Centa-ed IVe-Nata! Cat 
• Biitii Control • Gynecologic k Laser Suigeiy 

495-9400 . JjJCSL- 436-0167 

5265 Prmideiux Rd. p_- . Detected k Trcried ^ K'^d>orough Sq^ve 
Sim 101 \^n^ .«.i— . Suite C 



VABeadi 



•Co ipoK o py kLetp 



Chesapeake 



iMMMl 



iwwpi^^i^ 



m' jwiwipipapipi 



6 VTOiiia BeacA Sim. FrM«y. Dw^anber 22. 1995 

Jaycees share spirit 
of giving withchildren 

"/ love me warm, 

fuzzy projects 

like this. Some 

people have 

different reasor)s 

for Joining, but 

the community 

service aspect 

Is why I Joined, 

There's a 

tremendous 

support In the 

chapter with the 

members 

^^^^QSout. 



□ CoMlniMd^emNgai 

organizttioii ifter vtdonteeriog 
wiih the fbapf^ qjne and ev»- 
tually joined die club. Oaydosh 
himMlf was even aasigned thii 
yMT to help two "iooUm." voiiui- 
teni 7(M mi Jtn Heno, g« Oie 
hang (tf buddy dK^^^. 
» Soon they w«« palrad with 
Miller, who |)roved lo be an §■• 
bite, if not thrifty, ih^^ m ht 
drove I ihq^ng cut ctoini iriile 
ift« alile in nuch of the {mUki 
fifti for hii fiutrily. 

"The plant'i for my mom ^mne 
ihe'i the only one who ItkM 
plena, Tlie Jewelry'i to hir, too. 
The video ii for the whtte iui- 
ily," he itaeiMd quIeUy ii Todd 
end Ian told him he hid $30 left 
toipeni. 

Wheeling around the euaen 
lecdon in levch of "one witeut 
I light (flath)" for hli flther. the 
youth became an even mm dii- 
criminating cummer. 

Picking up om point-and*ihoot 
model,, he aiked with a big, 
toothy grin, "How much li thli 
one?" 

"Nineteen dolliri and 97 
centi," the Fioroi uuwered. 

"Too much, too mwh," MiUer 
laid ihak^ hii head. "When »e 
the cheip« onei?" 

With a guiding hand, the cou- 
ple led him to mother wiU dii • 
play, whoe the boy picked out i 
$4,97 diipoiable cusmu 
. "Yeah, thii if itlJiut right," he 
nodded, toning the gift in hii 
bailnt. 

"OueH we're going for quanti^ 
of gift! today," Todd obmved aa 
the youngiten hopped off in dM 
direction of the homry ride. 

The Pimoi looted at aaohi 
odiw vid imitod at yooi^ NOUer'a 
boundleii «i^gy. 

"We try to do lomething every 
yev to help ki(b out aiHl at flnt 
didnt know what lb do thla ytar," 
lanenliUmd, 

Luckily, through her Job at 
Twin B Auto Fvti and that buii- 
neii' pait dealingi with the 
Jayceei, the learned about die 
Chriitmai Shewing Tour, Now 
the cot^le it linking of Jdnii^ 
the o^ganiatoi. 

"Bvtfyoae we've met in the 
liQpeeaa hu baen peat, and whm 
I hevd thiu thli ««• one of tl^ 
n«tt big ptojteu,! wu excited. 
They do iwh g^ tbhigi for die 
community," Jan continued, 
"They're fantaidc peojde." 

'And the unique diing about 
Uiii program today diat lets it 
i^Mrt from otiiers li diat It ttenei 
die Joy of giving," Todd contin- 
ued. "It'i ^out giving, not receiv- 
ing. That's die part I like." 




In another part of die 
lUm. new Jayceei membw Joel 
Toah wai wheeling around die 
children'i clothing department 
widi hii young clutfge, 7-y^-^ 
Aihley Ladiam — uid he wai 
loddng Jttit a Utde bit cmfoaed, 

"rve never t^n a Utde girl 
ihqqiing before, at leut not to 
die beat of my knowledge, but 
we'll make it," he idd healtandy 
ai Latham Nareted f(» a iweat- 
ihl^forherbrodw, 

"What liaa doei he wear?" 
Todi period. 

The young girl ihrugged her 
ihoulden u if to lay "I don't 
know," 



"WeU, how taU U he?" he con 
daued. 

"TaUttr dian me," riie aidd fi- 
nally. 

"Um, how about a hat inattad?" 
Toehiiig^ted, 

Ladiam noddml her head in 
vlgoroui agreement and die two 
•trolled to a dliplay of ballcapi. 

"I wai looking for lomediing to 
do ta Mmeone elie, being alngle 
and all and not having any bmily 
hm," nplidned Toih, a nadve of 
Penniylvanla. "Thla ii a chal- 
lenge." 

iins die pune iecd<m, Jayceei 
Barbara Cfharlei and Denlie 
MlieheU had dielr handa foU help- 
ing tiw aiiten pick jmaenti f« 
dwlrfomUy. 

The only imiblem wai that 
Sade Downing, 6, and her liiter 
Demeda, 10, wanted to buy tot 
dielr extended familiei ai well 
and vraiddn't ha^ entnigh Mdi to 
buy gifti for each odiarl Thdr two 
ihomHng buddiea quledy aaiwed 
each otto' diat If the chlldrwi re- 
ally wanted nmediing Kid went 
ov« budget, diey'd foM dw ex- 
een, 

"I really ei^oy watching die 
kldi weVe widi and lealng die 
imilei on dieir facet." Charlei 
Mid. "When diey fint came In 
here, diey locdied kind of woirled; 
now dM^ many into it* 

Trying to be SO plaoaa at one 
dme and aiiure that everyone 
wai happy, Virginia Be. 
Jayceei preiident Bedi Steveni 
wu hiffriedly flitting ftom lecdon 
to lecdon. but pauied to reflect a 
mmient on what die ihopplng 
ipree hai meant to her over die 
yean. 

"I love die warm, fozzy prc^u 
like dill," ihe udd. "Some people 
have dlffneot reaioni for Joiidng, 
but die community Mvlce aapwt 
ia why I Joined. Tliere'i a tremen- 
doui lupport in die chaptv widi 
die memben coming out; Td lay 
we have a leut SO or 60 Jayceei 
h«t today." 

By die end of die afternoon 
Ihopplng ipree, armi loaded down 
widi Ihopplng bagi, die chlldran 
wera.died, yet hi^py, But die fon 
didn't end dwre. Billy Bob'i Plzia 
and PamUy BntotalnflMnt ipon- 
Mrad a hoUd^ party for die chU- 
(b«i and Ji^ceei. 

For mart it^ormaiion OHjoiiUng 
the Viriinia Beach Jaycees, call 
499^2^. 





OeurMynMMi 



Just one day of CBlobratlngl 

The holiday seaion brfngs a fnntic pace to homei and ichooti iHlce. 
But when three ichoda are located on one campui, u the the caae 
with Cipe Heniy Collegiate, certain timet offeri imorpibord of 
aetional photo opporttjnMei. Beildei the actMtiei pictured here, 
atudenti were raliinf money for the Joy Fund and Operation Smile, 
conductmg iweiter and coat drivei, coliectini toyi and food for the 
needy, and lomehow siting lome itudying (tone, tool Getting In the 
ipim, clockwiie from top, werei Marw Schiller and memben of the 
lower lehool SCA collecting food for The Dwelling Placei Felix 
Simmoni Sr., an actor and itoryteller, pretenting a ipeclal Kwanzaa 
prorim to lecond gnderii jeiilca Ziginzyk, a lenlor, raiding i 
holldiy itoiv to middle school itudentii and, Enci Scarborough, 
trailed II St. Lucia, puiing out tradltionil Swedlih trait to fellow 
tUKtentt. 



Caroiing riders spread cheer on horsebacl( 

D.. ti I LTkl/MSI ^\^l^ JJ.J ..- . ... j,_. -■ «.. ,. 




M.y|^.m% w Mi IjWiM fi ^yMMlf JMMy mIm^ 



ByM,J.KNOBLOCK 
Sun Correepondent 

HortiV sound for die hoUdayi, 

Thtf I how tome BiandMi Middle 
Schod mdmi ^ hito dw holiday 
iplrit. 

Mraibm of the ichool'i 4-H 
Hone Clid) decontted di^ honei in 
fNdve (»Mmentttoi for die diird 
annual Chriitmai Caroling on 
Horiaback and Hayrlde lait 
wediand. 

Ilie canvan ^ duve hay-fllled 
|rick-up Mda foltowed by leverd 
decomed horm paraded dinx^ the 
neighbwhood lurrounding the 
icbool ai diey lang Chriitmai 
caroli and hoUday tunes. 

The h(»ei iported dnnl nd 
belli on dieir manei, uili and 
hoovei. Some wore Kris Kring^e 
hati Kid h(^day^Mtt»ned Uankets. 

Kmi Land, die club'i sponsor 
and a hei^ Kid lAytical e(&mttk)n 
teachw k BrK^m Kfiddk School, 
h^jed Kxadinate die poup of cold- 
yet-merry carolers and riders 
dvou|^ 6eiT expedidon. 

Sht witcl^ as diey returned to 
die school gym for a small 
QitiKnaapK^, 

"It'a Just to add a litUe twist to 
CKtdlng, n&et dian walking," said 
Land. "We have a couple other 
cluba joining u today — die Red 
Bnm Rfaien 4-H Club mkI we also 
have Animal Awareness After 
Schod Qub. Tliey woe OMing) in 
the trades. 

"Th^ ium a goMi dme," she 

added. "Thla U «ff Ug evem of d» 
yeK." 

Land explained th« sev«al 
Bribers ci die i^otri't dub hnre 
th^ own toiei or leaae dmn from 
loctf terns. 

There are about 25 active 
ffiMriMa 1b Oe Bnndon chib, 

IMi ym. Land noted, has be«i 

»ioi^, the Mrid, becme of the 
volMam and thrir •nduidam to 
makaibaavMiwsik. 

"ta tta pM, )«« 1^^ ittve one 
iK^f good pH«RtvolHBMr and 10 
IddaMlfydadieMad," ihaMBMMd. 
"M M year, we have 2s artve 
U^ mi Jnit as many pvent 
voluiMHi. Weta na^ ciBU^ OB 
Md to iM^ to tta pete whan 
wa^kBomfor^" 

ftnat voloBtean helped by 



driving die trucki, dlrectfaig traffic 
and providing food to die canden. 

"I have got die beat group diii 
year," the added. "I have got at least 
one parent of every lUdmt involved 
in diis." 

The week before die event, die 
studenu went down die streets of 
die pande rcmte and put flyers 
announcing die fesdvides on each 
houae'idoor. 

"The neighbori really fook 
fca^ard to ui coming out caroling 
in the neighborhoods," lald Land 
Every yev I have die PTA addng if 
we're r^ to come CKoling." 

She uid it's imjwrtant fm* die 
school and its lumniinding reiidoits 
to have a good reladtmdito. 

"It's very Important for us to 
ootmcl die neij^boriiood widi die 
school," said Land noted. "It des in 
v»y nicely widi dw philosophy of 
BrKKkm Middle School -- having a 
cmnecdra between the community 
and the school and having die 
community involved with the 
school." 

Land sakl diu niKiy folks cone 



outride to liiMi to die carolen and 
tee die horiei while othm get 
more Involved. 

"We had a wmderful audience 
dill )«ar," she said, "Last yev die 
Leigh family, we went by dieir 
hoiMwa»i diey Joined in, 

"Their flrst year, diey Joined 
idnig In a golf cirt, decoated. This 
ia di^ aactmd yw widi ui, We 
love fo get {wdcipanti from die 
nei^bcxhood. 

Steven Leigh walked widi hit 
wifi nd die fiunily &)g, whUe dwfr 
t«« cMklren, Ti^lor and Ctwtney, 
rode in a puUed nd wa^. 

"We teve a to^ burineia and we 
live in die neighbwhood," aald 
Ldgh. "We dedttod oiv family Hid 
dc% wodd Idn to be in die pKWto." 

Memben of die Red Bar«i 4-H 
Club also Joined die holiday 
feidvidei. They helped decorate 
dieir honei vkI sang carols with 
die students as diey rode behiiul die 
hayridetruda. 

"It'i Just a Am way to celebnte 
Chrisdnai, and it's a fun diing U) 
do," said Jeni Louder, a Blackwaw 



rMldent and member of the Red 
Banm Ridm 4-H Club. "We love 
our honei, to we love to do dUn^ 
widi dim. We liln to ^ out in die 
neighborhood widi diem to petite 
who don't nnidly get to tee honea 
can tee diem," 

Thli year, Louder rode hw lon'i 
hCMWiFq^y. 

"ib't not real uied to pKadei, 10 
I diougbt I'd bring him out hen," 
the npli^ned. "He did isetty iooi. 
He wai a litOe Jumpy at fint. but 
diKi he calmed down and he waa 
flne." 

Ai Peppy waited for Mi fesdve 
densadou to be ranoved and hli 
coat to be pxMned, he occari<»ially 
mated Kid itamped. 

But tot die chlldnn, it waa 
special. 

When Land ariced the children 
why diey lik«i to be part of die 
caroling m horseback, diey said 
"being around friends, being, 
singing, decoradng horses and 
bdng arouiKl dw hoiws." 

"It's Juit fun," giggled one shy 
studoit. 




Iltti 



to ttt MrMia H aMiMi IM tte 



Mitt 



Vk 1**^ »J*i^i»^*€,l 



ww^mmmmmgmmmmmmmmmimmmimmimmmmmmm 



^mmimm 



Virginia Beach Sun. Friday. DecCTibg- 22. 1995 7 



Virginia Beach Volunteer Opportunities 



The following volunteer op- 
portunities are available in 
Virginia Beach thcough the 
Virginia Beach Volunteer 
Council: 

■ Police Department • Criiii 
Couawlor; Individual wUl provide 
public reUdmi/iervlce to the 
^bUc to Hfdy mam aitoleacMU 
who tre violating curfew in 
Virginia Baaeh to their Itga! 
guardiin. Dutiei will inolnda 
providing an information iheet to 
tte youta for completion lo that 
guardian can to contacted, and 
providing lalD environment until 



more information, call Kathlem 
Reed at 437-4949. 

■ Finance Department • 
Account Clerk Assistant: 
Volunteers will assist staff with 
ffliicellaneoui clerical duties 
such as typing, filing, photo- 
copying, mail preparation, 
reiearching eat, and aniw«lng 
phones. Ifoun: FlaxlUa, Monday 
dtfough FHday, batwe«i 9 a.m, • S 
p,m. Fw addititmal faiftmrn^mi, 
contact Donna Vanghui at 427* 
441S. 

■ Department of Social 
Servieei • BUglbUity Aiilitanta: 
In^viduali will pwfbnn gmwal 



guardian arrives; contacting legal office duUei moludlng filing, 
guardian via telephone or police aniwering telephones, data entry' 



offl^ reared to die home; and 
contacting police diq^atoher to 
request MReer pick-up ywth for 
plaeiemem^ In Juvenile Intake 
whm l^al guardian cannot be 
reached. 

Qudlflcatlons: ^pUcutts must 
be high school graduates with 
good communication skills, 
ability to deal with adolescents 
(set limltt and enforce rules with 
adolescents) and to articulate 
with legal guardlan(8} why the^ 
adolescent was pick-up by the 
police and make arrangements for 
safe return, criminal record and 
background checks will be 
conducted. Ifows: A]q»oxlmatoly 
eight hoiffi pw ditft, on-call buis 
seven days per week. For more 
information, contact Det. Don 
Rimer at 427-4101. 

■ Police DeiHuimmt • Tram- 
poittdon Aide Ord fteclnct^nito- 
pendence); Voluntew needed on 
Tuesday and Thur^ mornings 
to drive police cvs to various 
places tot malntmuce. Requires 
attendance of the defensive 
driving course offered f^ee of 
charge by the city of Virginia 
Beach. Contact Barbara 
Biienberg at 427-4970 for idd- 
Itlmal Information. 

■ Police D^tfunent ■ Animal 
Control Officer Aislitant: 
VolunttwB are needed to ride and 
aiilit animal conuvl officer, 
Animal caretakers are alio 
needed. Day and evening ihlfti; 
hours flexible. Conuet Bvbara 
BIsenberg at 427-4970 for 
additional Inflwmaticm. 

■'Pt)ll6e Di^tftment • ^BfUag 
BnftiVMient Specialist fnffi 
CP.B.S.T.): Voluntters are needed 
fo help with enforcing huidicap 
parking on public and private 
parking lots. Day and evening 
shifts; hours flexible. Disabled 
persons welcome to apply, 
coitact Barl»n Bisenberg at 427- 
4970 for additional Information. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
District Court ■ File Clerk 
(Criminal Division): Voltmteers 
will provide office assistance toi 
criminid couri supervisor. Duties 
will Include filing, issuing 
subpoenas, entering case daM 
Into computer system, answering 
telephones and various other 
duties ai needed. 

Qualifications: Ability to woric 
alone and wltii otiien Including 
the general public In a positive, 
courteous and professional 
manner; and ability to handle 
Interruptions while maintaining 
concentration. Hours: Flexible, 
Monday tlm)ugh Friday, between 
9 a.m. • S p.m. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
District Court - FUe Cleric (Civil 
Division): Volunteo's will assist 
docket clerk by filing and 
retrieving cases after court. 
Kvting cases by day order and 
filing in return day fol<tor and 
attaching affidavit (service retiim 
affidavit) to cases. Qualificatims: 
Ability to accurately sort by 
numerical order, day/date order 
and/or alphabetical order. 
Commitment: Four • six hours 
daUy. ¥(x additional informaticm, 
cratact Ruth Ktertinex at 426- 
5674. 

■ Virginia Beach General 
District Court • Entry Clerk (Civil 
Divisicm): Volunteers will ]mnride 
office assisttnce in ivocessing 
new ca^ pria to forweding to • 
Sl^ff for s»vice. Duties include 
entering mw cans in compute' 
system and i»^^wing envelc|>es 
for ou^dng mall. (^laUficatkms: 
Accurate ^ing ddUs.tnowM^ 
of penonal ^mpam, nd MUqt 
to worit witi) limited nipervlslMi. 
Commlunent: six • eight hours 
(tally. For addl^mal infnmi^on, 
ccmtaet Rutii Nfttftinex at 42i6- 
S674. 

I Virginia Marine Science 
Museum - Museum Volunte^: 
Volunteen an neettod for a 
varlMy of aailgnnenta In ^ 
museum Inelumg Atoliitraa 
Dedc out Shop, Ty^nCMIleo 
A^Mnt (g^sral emeA Mh 
4utlea) ud MoMum D^ent. 
some tntining wUI be piovlded. 
Jfowvi varied and flexible. For 



Social Work Aide: Individual 
win provide supportive and 
supplemental services to clients 
and staff within foster cm unite. 
These duties will Include pro- 
viding transpOTtetion of childrm 
to various appointments, ob- 
swving and asausing imrent/chlld 
interactions and reporting findings 
to social worker and assisting 
with clerical support. Must 
possess a valid driver's license 
and a good driving record. 
Interpersonal skills, a non- 
judgemental attitude towards 
clienu, ability lo maintain strict 
confidentiality standards and 
professionalism an essential. 
Tralnhig wUI be provided. Hours: 
Varied and flexlUe. 

Interested Individuals should 
contact Misty Lee at 437-3214 for 
adttttiond Informatio). 

■ MH^IR • Comprehensive 
Mental Healtii Services - Several 
Individuals are deeded for enh of 
tiie following positions: Beach 
House Tut«, Beach House Van 
Driver, cloical Assistant, Clvk, 
Friendly Visitor, Activity 
Asslsttnt, Van Drivers, Interior 
Designer (for play tiier^y/elin- 
Ical service roo^ns) and Resource 
Room Assistant (make resource 
mawlal available). 

Hours: Nfonday • Friday; vvled. 
For more information, call 
Tommle Cubine at 437-S760. 

I Department of Housing • 
Clerical Assistant: Individual will 
perform genernl office duties 
including filing, photo copying, 
answering teleptonn and typing 
on tiie computer. Wonl Periact 
tndning will be provided. Hours: 
Flexible, For additional 
Information, contact Jitile Ponder 
at426-S7S0, 

■ Depariment of Management 
and Budget • Administrative 
Aide: Individual will be 
responsible for organizing files, 
collect. Interpret and enter date 
into a computer. Prefer collet 
graduate or student seeking 
college (togree. Ability to work 
well witi) math and numbov, pay 
attention to detell and some 
knowledge of QPRO prefend. 
Training available. Hours: 
Rexlble, Monday timugh Friday, 
Fw more Information, cidl Itarry 
Oarbls at 430-6372. 

■ Public Works - Date Bntry 
Asslsttnt: Individual will usist 
Uie date entry of field notes 
provided by the Planning and 
Bstimator II who is responsible for 
Investigating, planning and 
coordinating activities associated 
with traffic signs, pavement 
maridngs, special evente, aids to 
navigation and moving/hauling 
permits. Knowledge of comiwten 
and simple drawing techniques 
are i^eferred, Houn: Flexible; 
TuNday tiuough Friday from 8:30 
a.m. • 3:30 p.m. For more 
Information, contact Wayne 
DeFord at 427-7470. 

■ Public Wm'ks/Bnglneering - 
nie Cleric: Volunte^ an needed 
to maintain accurate correqwnd- 
ence files for easy retrieval 
proving quality support to tiie 
Engineering Division. Mmary 
duties will include assisting 
general public and otiier city 
employees witii file retrieval, tiie 
gatiiering of information and 
making copies; and otter routine 
file room tadcs u ineded. 

Qualifications: comjwttf skills 
(Word Perfect, R-Base, and 
Quattro ?to); ud ability to use a 
micro-fiche reader, follow 
written/oral instructions and 
ptffcHm uslgnments in courteous, 
friendly ami professional manwr 
are desired. Training and 
supervision will be provided, 
Houn: flexible - four hours ptx 
day, Monday through Friday 
^Mtably mining hours), ?m 
i^dltiwal Information contact 
ludy Hhekman at 427-4131 «: 
C^Xmicr at 427-4167, 

■ mite Wota^glneering - 
Chronologlst: Individual will 
research varioua fliM In the 
B^ineerini FUe Roon and write 
stsmokn^ ^9mm In ordw to 
pwlde Kco^ hlMories te us 
In Mun cases, ete. witiiln the 



depvtment DutiM also include 
Ma mtry taito rompntor Kitwtst 
applkations. Familiarity witii 
computer software applications 
such as WPS.l and R-Base, 
abillQr to follow written and oal 
Instructions and excellent 
communications skills are 
required. Hours: Flexible and 
varied. For additional Inforeuilon, 
oontect Richard BlUott at 427- 
4131 or Cheryl Kramer at 427- 
4167. 

■ Public Woricintaffic Bngln- 
eering • Streetilght Outage 
Investigator: Individuals are ne- 
eded to locate and document 
ftreetUght outeges wIdUn tiw city 
of Vlr^nla Beach, The city seeks 
to Improve public safety 1^ uiiat 
a pmctive i^proaeh to managing 
streetlight outeges. Motivated 
Individuals vi needed to provide 
night time Investigations for 
streetlight outeges. Individuals 
must be able to accurately 
de^be problems usocUted with 
street lighting and prepare a clear 
concise description of the 
location of tiie defective street- 
light. Houn: Flexible, evenings 
only, For more Information, 
please contact Roben Grey at 
427-4491. 



Volunteers are 
rieeded to help 
with er)forclng 

handicap parking 

on public and 

private parking 

lots. 



■ Public Information Oflflce • 
Date Bn^ Clalc: To perform tiie 
duties (^ logging In photography 
Inventwy, prinu, negatives and 
slides. Individual must have Uie 
ability to organlie slide flies. 
Interest In photography and 
knowledge of the Virginia Beach 
area ii helpflil, Supwvliw and 
tntadni provided. Hours: Flexible. 
For more information, please 
conteflt Carol Anold at 427'4m. 

■ Sheriff's Department - Cle^ 
leal Workers; Individuals will 
perform flllng, basic typing, date 
mu-y and genmti clerical duties 
as needed. Supervise will tnln. 
Hours: flexible. Pass a 
background Investigation check, 
computer check for criminal 
history. For more Information, call 
Helene Quick at 427-8045. 

■ Circuit Court - Court 
Informaticm Aide: Individuals witii 
da desire to help otitis are being 
sought to man Uie Information 
bocHh and imvlde infmnation to 
cltlaens needing help In 
navigating tiieir way tivough tiie 
Virginia Beach Courte cnnplex. 
Ap^icantt must have a pleasant 
persmality and ei\)oy helping tiie 
public. A background check will 
be completed on each applicant. 
Inning will be provided upon 
assignment. Hours: Flexible, 
Mm^y - Friday, between 8 a.m. 
- 2 p.m. For additional inform- 
ation, contact Tina Sinnen at 427- 
4940. 

■ Sheriffs Office - AuxUiary 



Deputy Sheriff: Several vol- 
imteos are needed to poftrnn the 
duties of a canity shoiff which 
include: guarding, procMsing and 
cttlttg tor Inmtiea. Job may also 
taehide pctfonnlag security duties 
at ntUm civic and chariteble 
functions. Individuals must be 
U.S. citiiens, 21 years old, 
possess a high school diploma or 
Itt equivalent; be In good healtii 
and capable of passing a back- 
snund Investigation. Ttilning wUI 
M provided. 

Hours: 20 hours per montii any 
time during a seven day week 
ttom Sunday to Sunday, and a 
minimum of six months 
commitment Is required. Fbr mwe 
Information, contact Deputy 
David Hvris at 427-4340. 

■ Virginia Beach CASA 
Program - Court Appointed 
Special Advocate: Volunteers 
over 23 years of age are needed 
to act as special advocates for 
chUdrwi who are in court due to 
abuM, neglect or abandonment. 
Responsibilities Include Inter- 
viewing tite recommendations tot 
placement, attending all court 
hearings Involving tiie child, 
monlM^ng couri ordws, visiting 
tite children on a weddy or bl- 
weddy buls. Appllcante must be 
able to commit to a mhilmum of 
one year of service, Pre-service 
tnlning (30 hours) Is provided. 
¥ot more Information, contect 
PriuieesDllle at 426-3616. 

■ Bmergency Medical Swices 
• Rescue Volunteer: Volunteers 
are needed to be a pan of tin all- 
volunteer rescue team, Must be at 
least 18 years of age and meet 
the departmental medical, 
criminal background and DMV 
standards. Anycme Interested must 
atiend an orlentetion prognun. For 
dates and times of orientetlon, 
please oontaci the BMS 
Administration Office at 437- 
48S0. 

■ Public Library/Central - 
Uteary Stvpori Aide: Voluntews 
are also needed for variety of 
asslgnmenu wltiiln the Central 
Library Including shelving of 
books uid audio visual material 
and otiier suj^rt ttsks. Tnlning 
will be provided. Hoiffs: Flexible 
and vaned; Including evenings 
and weekends. Conuot Ilene 
Syder at 431-3031. 

■ Public Library/Central • 
Cleik: Volunteen will perform tin 
duties of flllng. photocopying, 
checking pwlodlcals uid woridng 
on special projects. Qual- 
ifications: Ability to organise 
files and prior office work 
experience helpAil. Hours: Varied 
- four hours per week. For more 
information, contact Sandy 
MarshaU at 431-3090. 

■ Public Library/WAHAB 
Public Law Library - Technical 
Support Aide: Volunteers are 
needed to provide staff support in 
a variety of area. Duties: 
niotocq)y materials as requested; 
read shelves to maintain 
collection in Dewey Decimal 
classification c^der for accurate 
access; mainteln brochure racks, 
restocking legal a d consumer 
infmnation pamphlete on regular 
buls; file suj^lemenuti materials 
In books and loneteaf servlm. 

Qualifications: Ability to use 
office equipment (photocopier, 
fax, etc.); familiarity witii lilmuy 



(vganizational systems, in parti- 
cular Dewey Decimal Class- 
ification; ability to follow oral 
and writtm instructions and work 
accuratdy (attention to detail)m 
neatiy and independentiy. Hours: 
Flexible and varied; Monday 
dirough Mday, 8:30 a.m. S p,m,; 
a minimum of four hours par wedc 
commitment is requb«d. Contact 
Pat Jones or Jill Burr at 427-4419, 

■ Bconomic Development - 
Cleric Typist: Individual to assist 
itaff In assMnUlng teochures and 
Informational packages; making 
copies; sending faxes; clipping 
and flllng newspaper tftldes; 
flllng correspondence; nswering 
telephones; and light typing. 
Hours: One day p« wedc for two 
half-days per week. For more 
Information, call 499-4367. 

■ Fire D^Mriment • Volunteer 
Flnflghter - Position #3-4431- 
8888 Individual wlU assist tiie 
department's fln^ghting fbrces in 
fire suppression and salvage 
activities. Quallflcations: Must 
meet tiie departmental medical, 
age, vision, physical aglUty and 
criminal backf^und stendards. 
l^lnlng and protective equip- 
ment Is provided at no cost to die 
volunteer. Hours: Flexible any- 
time at all, minimum 24 hours of 
activity per mmtii necessvy. For 
more Information, contect the 
Volunteer Coordinator at 437- 
4811. Applications are available 
in the Staffing and Placement 
Division of Human Resources, 
Municipal Center, Building 18, 
Virginia Beach, Va„ 234S6. 

■ General Registrar - Voter 
Registrars: Will assist the vot«r 
Registrar's office with special 
voter registration drives that ar 
held In such places as malls, 
grocery stores, nursing homes, 
churches and otiier locations. 
Volunteoi must attend a two hour 
training program on voter 
registrations and applicable 
legislation uid must be citiiens 



of Virginia Beach in (Md^ to be 
deputized. Houn: Varied - some 
wedcends. Contact Marlene Clay 
Hager at 427-8683 for more 
infnmation. 

■ Oener^ District Court/Tntf- 
flc: Volunteers are needed to 
assist suiff in tiie Traffic Divlrion. 
Individuals will enter cases into 
tiie computerized system and file 
pending and closed cases. 
Training and supwvisicHi provided. 
Volunteer houn are flexible: 8:30 
a.m, • 4 p.m,, Wednesdays. Call 
Pam Maxey at 426-5814 for 
addition^ information, 

■ Youth and Family Ser- 
vicci/Court Swvices Unit: Volun- 
teen needed to woric witii victims 
of family violence. Hours: 9 a.m, - 
noon, All work will be done at 
court. Training provided. Contect 
Judy McReynolds at 427-8019. 

■ General S«^lcei Department 
- Environmental Aide: Volunteers 
are needed to stencil storm drains 

•on residential streets and in 
commercial parking lots. The city 
is part of a nationwide Storm 
Drain Stenciling i^ogram, which 
will raise the public awareness to 
avoid the use of poUuunts in 
Storm drains. Call Beach-Line, 24 
hour automated telephone system 
at 427-3580 ext. 826, Leave your 
name, phone number and tiio area 
in which you are interested in 
Stenciling, A volunteer will return 
your call, Houn: Flexible, 

When no contact penon for 
a department is listed, or when 
contect person is unavailable, or 
for additional Infcumation, conuct 
tiie volunteer recruitment/referral 
coordinator at 430-6372 (Voice 
Mail) or the Department of 
Human Resources, Steffing and 
Placement Division at 427-4157. 

You may obtain and submit a 
volunteer applieatton to the City 
of Virginia Beach Department of 
Human Resourcei, Municipal 
Center-Building 18, Virginia 
Beach, Va. 2356, 



Be kind to your community, 
environment during the holidays 



Did you know that If every 
American tiuows away Just one Ute 
of turkey wltii gnvy tills holiday 
season, eight million pounds of 
food Is wasted? 

Ruby Anedondo, VIrghila Beach 
Clean Community Commission 
coOTdlnator, says that choosing 
your food portions wisely is one 
way to reduce waste tiuoughout die 
holidays uids at anytime of the 
ynr. 

The Virginia Beach Clean 
Community Commission is 
supporting a national campaign 
called "Use Uss Stuff" that 
prcmiotes simple ways Indivlduids 
cu reduce watia in dteir h(»nes and 
neighborhoods. The campaign, 
which brings together 
envlronmenul. government and 
academic groups began on Nov. 16 
wldi tite first annual Use Leu Stuff 
D^. 

"Between Thanksgiving and New 
Yen's Am^cans are expected to 
geimite more tiian 25 million tons 
of tradi," said Arrendcmdo. "That 
antoimtt to about one miUion extn 
tons per week during tills period 
vemu dte rest of dte year." 

Here are sevwal ways to reduce 
waste during the holiday season: 



I Purchase products in bulk. 

■ Get a tree tiiat can be planted 
(ff mulched or buy an wtificial one. 

■ Make gifts out of items you 
alreacW have around the house. 

■ Compost leftover fruits, 
vegeteUes and peels. 

■ Buy rechargeable batteries for 
toys and otiier items tiiat ve used 
frequentiy. 

■ Reuse pKkaging cartons and 
shij^g materials. Old newspapers 
make for excellent packing 
material. 

■ Send guesM home with 
leftoven. 

■ C^t off tiie front of cvds you 
receive and reuse tiinn as postcards 
otoiramcau, 

■ Malte it your number one new 
year's resolution to use less stuff 
tiuoughout die year. 

The Virginia Beach Clean 
Community Commission is a 
Mayor-^ppointBd program fcmned in 
1980 to underuke the tesk of 
promoting litter prevention, 
recycling, beautification and gei^al 
environmental awareness tiirough 
educational projects designed to 
reach all segments of our 
community. 



United Way celebrates successful campaign 



By KATHERINE OVERKAMP 
UnMsd Wy o( Seuti Hampton Reads 

Mae thn 500 volunteer woricers 
from tte tocal United Way of Scmtii 
IbnqNmi Roads, Combined Federal 
Campalp (CFQ, ud «miUned 
Virginia Campaign (CVC), 
celelnted tills year's joint tmd- 
raising effort Ina unlqiw tropical 
setting of palm trees and 
Polynesian hors d'oeuvrn as Terry 
Zahn ttid Smtaa ftriEV (rf WVEC- 
TV served as master u«l ntitten of 
ceremoi^a, 

David A. King Jr., chitirman for 
tiie 1995 United Way ofSouth 
HamMon Roads campal^, r^Msted 
titet $10^448. 9S) has been ralaed, 
repw ae n tfa^ 100,3 pseent d tiiU 
yc«^UnlMdWQr|otf. > 

In nooui^ the United Way 
totti, Klii »e«ned tin cmpaigm 
wccesB n ne a i^nxin ncn^wi irom 
tiw commiml^. 

"The te«ffi work of the 
volunteeti, te agnetes uid tiie 

smMt Ualiid Ww. have mMe 
tiiu snpfini B fl rtMf . Khw uid, 

CoMribMtaioie iMed W^ 
eamp^ tm^ ta the «m lo 
support m mMiA UiM W^ 
a^^i and iMie Am fli ^ar 
local bMltt a^ huuffl a«v^ 



agencies. 

The Combined Federal 
Cunpalgn, which has beoi exiaided 
until Dec. 15 to accommodate 
ounpalgns among ships tiut are 
^kytA uomi tiw world, gave a 
pn^ress rqwrt of $4.7 million, or 
94 percent (rf Itt 1995 goel. 

Cole, chalrmui of tiie CFC, 
recognized tiie efforte of federal 
emptovees on behalf of tiie local 
cai^alp. 

"I'm really proud of the 
ttemendous Mm ottm by our 
military and civilian federal 
employees," Cole said. "The 
campidgn reauUs tonight reflMt 
tiielr pnerous nppm t<a tiie 
health and human service 
organliatlons around this 
commi^ty In whteh tii^ serve." 

CK cMitrtettioM su^Nxt kical, 
stete, naticmri and tatomtiraal 
arawte. ^^proidmaMy OM-Abd 
(^aU ftanda iirised dotM^ tiw CTC 
ve te^nated to agencies In 
lym^on Roads. 

Hw CVC mad in at mi,m 
more Aan 100 per^ of Itt loal. 
Piu^ ntiied tiutmgh tte CVC 
luifM local, MM, MMtootf ai^ 



Just above tiie amount raised during 
last year's fund drive, 
^pimximately 88 penrat of aU 



contributions come from 
Individuals; the remaining 12 
pw^nt ftom area onporations. 




QtWItltf rMIV 



Ine KMibbwd loHl w tte teae 
oampiri^ MSMB to S1S4 minfon. 



M. 



MM WRGMMIK II 



(■^^^■I 



mmmfmwMi,*m,TV 



I Vinpnia Beach Sun, t-nday. uecember a. iyy5 



TRT riders open hearts to the hungry 

HOV riders give 



food to less 
fortunate as 
holiday offering 

By MARGARET WINDLEY 
Sun Corrssponden! 

Last Friday befrae the first few 
fingers of dawn began whispering 
across the sky, Naval Base 
employees w«c riding to woik in 
TRTs HOV buses, so early in the 
morning that Christmas decor- 
ations were still glowing in many 
locations along the route. 

By their presence and gifts of 
food, they had supported a ^wo- 
week TRT food drive that would 
provide help to several hundred 
less-fortunate families in the 
Hampton Roads through the in- 
ternationally-known humanitarian 
organization Oper-ation Blessing. 
"We have bwn out here fw two 
weeks at the different Parte and 
Ride lots, Timberlake, Chimney 
Hill, Greenbrier, Indian River," 
ticket seller Don Clark had said 
earlier from his van between HOV 
bus arrivals and departures. 

"This is our last day. We have 
doing it for two weeks. For the 
first year, I think this is pretty 
good." 

He continued, "It's hard to 
believe that we are living in a 
country like the United States, 
and peq)le are still hungry." 

Clark added that TRT might 
consider providing more 
advertising for the food drive in 
future events, "because I sense 
that a lot of folks have no idea of 
wha.t we are doing. I have had 
people walk up to the buses in the 
last couple of weeks that didn't 
ride. They would just donate, and 
I would try to get them a ticket — 
but they wouldn't take it The odd 
thing about the two cases that I 
am thinking about took place on 
Monday when it was bitterly cold, 
bitterly cold. A lady and a man 
both had large bags that they 
donated." 

Ticket sellers on the early 
morning HOV runs were giving 
one ticket to anybody who 
donated three to five cans and 
two to those who donated six or 
more. The bus waiting patiently 
over at the stop was the bus 
dedicated by TRT to hold the 
canned goods collected in the 
food drive, its seats bulging with 
large, brown paper bags full of 
donated foodsmffs. 

As the food bus departed 
silently to check for canned good 
donations at the other HOV stops, 
the 6:20 am bus glided into sight 
Inside the HOV bus, the riders 
were silent, preparing themselves 
mentally for the busy work day 
atead. 

Cindy Rueff explained that she 
had given food to the drive, 
inqrired by her children. 

"They give themselves. My 
daughter and two sons are in 
school. They are always asking 
me if they can take stuff with 
them to daycare," she said. 




PUBUC INTERESTED IN 
ATTTOTOING THE PUBLIC 
HEARING SHOULD BE 
ADVISED THAT, FOR 
REASONS THE PLANNING 
COMMISSION DEEMS 
APPROPRIATE, CERTAIN 
ITEMS ON THE AGENDA 
MAY BE HEARD OUT OF 
ORDER AND THAT IT 
SHOULD NOT BE ASSUMED 
THAT THE ORDER LISTED 
BELOW WILL BE EXACTLY 
FOLLOWED DURING THE 
PUBLIC HEARING. 

The staff reviews of scmie » all 
of the items on this agenda 
suggest that certain conditions be 
attached to approval by City 
Council. However, it should not 
be assumed that those conditions 
constitute all the conditions that 
will ultimately be att«;h«l to the 
project. Staff Agencies may 
impose further conditions and 
requirements during 

administration of applicable city 
ordinances. 

SUBDIVISTONVABTANf-F. 



ITS nUT 6IVM8 1IME OF YEAR. Operetioi Bkuiiig wliateen dittribite food givci by TMewater 
RnlMil tt tkc hraffy, Me4y f ■< hMMlctt thiMgimrt HainptM Roadt. 



"Because other people netG 
things, I feel that I can share," 
rider Kay Bradby gave as her 
reason for donating food to the 
drive. 

Her own daughter, a student at 
Atlantic Shores Christian School, 
had been in a commercial a few 
years ago for Operation Blessing 
advertising for donations to help 
provide poor children with much- 
needed school supplies. 

Keith Fulton, wearing a jacket 
decorated with patches from the 
different places he had served in 
the military, observed, "I have 
always given to food drives like 
that because there are a lot of 
people who don't have what I may 
have." 

To keep from forgetting to bring 
the cans ji| the early morning rush 
to catc^the 6:20 bus, he had put 
his calls in his jacket pockets at 
night when laying it out to wear 
in the morning. 

Their foodstuffs, like those of 
the others who participated in the 
drive, were sent to Operation 
Blessing's Distribution Center off 
Military Highway where, on 
Monday morning, it was unloaded 
by volunteers and given to 
charitable wganizations. 

"This food is not to stay here," 
said Ann Pilato. an Operation 
Blessing employee, speaking of 
the center. "It's to circulate and 
help all the ministries." 

"There arc so many needy 
people," said Joanne Tavolacci, 
the local community program 
cocffdinator for the agency. She 
explained that the food would be 
going to churches, the Salvaticm 
Army, shelters, and other 
charitable orpnizations. 

"The local churches will then 
prepare Christmas baskets with 
this food," she added. "The 
Salvation Army and Nehemiah 
Ministries." 
Carrie Spratley. an active 




!??. *** *"*•• *>?•"«•■ WeMlng employee Sinrai Gabriel 
cb^ Mt Uqfdcs af aH siics, stylet and colon to the dMribotcd 
to local cbNrM. Ibcy bHcct were donated by A-1 Bcacb BIkea. 



member of Garrett Community 
Full Gospel Baptist Church, was 
among the representatives of 
local organizations waiting to 
recwve. 

"We give it to the senior 
citizens and the needy," she said. 
"We give it out to the seniors 
every month Ind as needed to 
families within and outside the 
church as needed." 

Motivated by faith, Spratly 
added, "The way I look at it, as 
being a Christian and a child of 
God, I am a servant of God and 
He's using roe in this way." 

Elder Howell Wilson Sr. of 
Everlasting Life Pentecostal 
Church of God, as well as a 
prison minister involved in a 
ministry called Power to Struggle, 
was also part of transporting the 
foodstuffs to the needy. He was 
favorably impressed with the 
(^)erati(Mi's work. 



"It enhances the Christianity of 
all involved continuing to do 
God's work. By doing this, God is 
blessed. This is the time to be 
reaching out and helping people 
that is not fortunate as we are. 
Also to prisoners," he said. 

Sharon Gabriel, public relations 
coordinator for Operation 
Blessing, added that the operation 
was also giving away a large 
number of used but refurbished 
bicycles to needy families with 
children through it; . "Bikes for 
Tykes" program which it has 
coordinated with A-1 Beach 
Bikes. 

"They are refurbished and in 
good working condition," she said 
of the bicycles. 

If you are interested in donating 
to future Operation Blessing food 
drives, call Joanne Tavolacci at 
420-0057. 




Business 



The Virginia Beach Police 
Department will play host to a "Job 
Corp Seminar" on Thursday, Jan. 
25 at the Vii^inia Beach Central 
Liteary, 4100 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
frwn 7 - 8:30 p.m. 

come hear about America's 31- 
year-old success story the "New" 
Job Corps for young men and 
women age 16 thnwgh 24 by guest 
speaker, Tony Allcyne, Career 
Devel<^racnt Specialist, from the 
local NOTfolk Job Coip Office. 

For more information, call J(* 
Corps at 587-2762 or 1-800-889- 
9336. 



Government 



TTic city of Virginia B«:h has 
established a special holiday 
schedule for Christinas <md New 
Year's: 

■ AU city of Virginia Beach 
offices, including Francis Land 
Iksme, will be cbs«l from mxm oa 
Friday, Dec. 22 through Monday, 
Dec. 25 and will be closed on 
Kfonday. J^. 1. 

■ lie Virginia Maxwe Sc^k» 
M»^m will be closed on Mon^. 
Dec. 25. 

■ All Virginia Bewh Public 
Libraries, Bookmobile and 
Recreation C^ttRs will be clc^d 
from noon ai Friday Dec. 22 
Oms^h Mo^y, Dec. 23 and wiU 
resuBM regulv (Mm tews <» 



Tuesday, Dec. 26 and will bectosed 
Sunday and Monday, Dec. 31 ami 
Jan. 1. All municipal golf courses 
and paries will also be closed on 
Monday. Dec. 25. 

■ The Virginia Beach Health 
Department will be closed from 
noon, Friday, Dec. 22, through 
Tuesday, Dec. 26 and Mcmday. Jan. 

■ Virginia Beach Circuit and 
Circuit Court Cleric's Office will be 
closed on Monday and Tuesday, 
Dec. 25 and 26 and Mcxiday and 
Tuesday, Jan. 1 and 2. 

■ Virginia Beach City Public 
Schools will be closed from 
Monday, Dec. 25 through Ti^sday, 
Jan. 2. Virginia Beach School 
Administration Offices will be 
cl(»ed Mwiday and Tuesday, Dec. 
25 aid 26 and Jan. land 2. 

■ There will not be regular waste 
coUection m Monday, Dec. 25 <»• 
M(Hiday, Jan. 1. All customers who 
normally have collection services 
Ml Monday, will have coUection «i 
Tuesday, Dec, 26 ami Jim. 2. 

Times and dates are sub^ to 
change. Call die Public Infcrnnakm 
Office at 427-1111 for up-to-date 
ir.'iMTOWiOT. 



Recreation 



The historic Francis Land 
House and the Virginia Beach 
Department of Public Lilwaries 
invite you lo "Turn die ftigM erf 
History" on WedMsday, D«;. 27 
bom 1 • 4 p.m. a the Francis UumI 
H(N»e. Reading can tq^en new 
6sxxs, u4 this propun wUl be 
ytm 0tBfmf to V^Ua Rndi^ 
Mtmth in jMuary. 

Let the pages of tte books 
&me ali^ as you f o from room 
to rooB in tte ftsMis Laad 



House and discover new worlds. 
Through the use of reproduction 
artifacts you can "touch history" 
as you learn more about Coltmial 
history, Afiican-American histCHy, 
Native-American history, foods 
from long ago, gardening, 
adventure and animals. 

Local librarians will supply 
suggest^ reading lists for grades 
K - 8 in each of these subjects. 
Experts from the Francis Land 
House, the Lynnhaven Hc^se, the 
Virginia Marine Science Mu- 
seum, the Atlantic Wildfowl 
Heritage Museum, the Virginia 
Beach SPCA and the Virginia 
Beach Master Gardeners will be 
on hand to answer questions and 
to guide you as you "Turn the 
Pa^s of Histwy." 

Dr. Stephen Mansfield will be 
I^sent to sign copies of his bock 
"Princess Anne County and 
Virginia Beach: A Pictorial 
History." This pogram is free am! 
open to the public. For further 
infOTmation, call the Francis Lai^ 
House at 431^4000. 



Religion 



Catholic Charities of Hampton 
Roads is offering a remarriage 
preparation program for couples 
considering a new marriage on 
Jan. 10. 17 and 24. Topics will 
include: Understanding the Past, 
Relationship Building Techniques 
and How to Live in the New 
Marriage. 

Each session runs from 7 - 9 
p.m, and will be held at Catholic 
Charities, 4855 Princess Anne 
Rd., Virginia Beach. Contact John 
Tonry at 467-7707 for infonnation 
and to register. There is a $35 fee 
per couple. 



Public Notic» 



The Dvag(Mi Force Karate D«no 
Tean will {»esent a demcmstnttim 
in Martial Arts fa youths, ages 6 
to 21 ye^s old. Tliis [vc^rani win 
take piltt^ at die Kempsville Area 
Libr^ (832 Kanf^vilte Read) ai 
Saturday, Jan. 6 frcMi noon - 1 
p.m. ParticiiMion is limited to 65. 
C^49S-1016toiejiisi«. 




The Virginia Beach Planning 
commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Wednesday. January 
10, 1996 at 12:00 Noon in the 
Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Princess Anne 
Courthouse, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. A briefing session will 
be teld at 9:00 a.m. in die City 
Manager's Conference Room, 
City Hall BuUding. PLANNING 
COMMISSION ACnON IS NOT 
FINAL DETERMINATION OF 
TIffi APPLICATION, BUT ONLY 
A RECOMMENDATION TO THE 
CITY COUNCIL AS THE 
VIEWPOINT OF THE 
PLANNING COMMISSION. 
FINAL DETERMINATION OF 
THE APPLICATION IS TO BE 
MADE BY CITY OTUNCE. AT 
A LATER DATE. AFTER 
PUBLIC NOTICE IN A 
NEWSPAPER HAVING 
GENERAL CIRCULATION 
WmnN THE CITY. 

TH(^; MEMBERS OF THE 



1. 

Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the 
Subdivision Ordinance. 
Subdivision for Arnhold 
Marketing Services. Inc. ft-qierty 
is located at 716 Woodstock 
Road. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

2. 

Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officera in regard 
to certain elements of the 
Subdivision Ordinance. 
Subdivision for Whitt G. Sessoms, 
ni. Prcqierty is located on the east 
side of Sydnor Drive, south of 
55th Street. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

CHANGR Off 7 9lS[Jl^q 

DISTRICT CLA.<KiinrrATm»}; 

An Ordinance upon Applicatirai 
of Twin Star Enterprises Inc., tor a 
Change of Zoning Di.strict 

Classification from B-1 
Neighborhood Business District to 
0-2 Office District on the 
southeast side of N. Landing 
Road, northeast of Counhouse 
Drive. The proposed zoning 
classification change to 0-2 is for 
office land use. The 
Comprehensive Plan recommends 
use of this parcel for retail/service 
use in accordance with other Plan 
policies. Said parcels are located 
at 2380, 2387. 2388. 2395 & 2396 
Court Plaza Drive and contain 
4.889 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
4. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Doris Velma White-Harris for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from A- 12 
Apartment District to R-10 
Residential District on the south 
side of Old Virginia Beach Road, 
west of S. Birdneck Road. The 
proposed zoning classification 
change to R-10 is for single 
family residential land use on lots 
no less than 10,000 square feet. 
The Comprehensive Plan 
recommends use of diis parcel fw 
suburban low density residential 
at densities that are compatible 
with single family use in 
accordance with other Plan 
policies. Said parcel is located at 
1171 Old Virginia Beach Road 
and contains 13.068 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
5. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Taylor Farm Associates, LLC 
for a Change of Znniny nif^Q\i{ 
Classification from R-20 District 
to R-10 Residential District on 
the following i^ucels; 

Parcel 1: on the south side of 
London Bridge Road. 1460 feet 
more or less west of Pine View 
AveniK. 

Parcel 2: on die south side of 
London Bridge Road. 800 feet 
more or less west of Pine View 
Avenue. • 

The proposed zoning 
classification change to R-10 is 
for single family residential land 
use on lots no less than 10.000 
square feet. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of this 
parcel for suburban low ^nsity 
residential at densities that are 
compatible with single family use 
in accordance with other Plan 
policies. Said parcel contains 6.5 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGR 
6. 

An Qrdin»ice i]|xni Aiqilication 
of Taylor Farm Associates. LLC 
for a Changft of Tntiiny TMiftTKit 
Classificfltinn from AG-1 
Agricultural District to R-10 
Residential District (Mi certain 
pit^rty located 2650 feet mwe 
or less southwest of the 
inters^tion of London Bridge 
RojMl and Kne View Awnue. The 
proposed zoning classification 
change to R-10 is for single 
family residential land uk (m li^ 
no less than 10.000 square feet. 
The Comprehensive Plan 
r^^mm^ds ^ of diii {wcel fa 
suburban low density residential 



at densities thtt are comimtible 
with single family use in 
accordance with other Plan 
ptdicies. Said parcel contains 11 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGR 
7. 

An (Minance upon Application 
of Taylor Farm Associate, LLC 
for a Change of Tnniwy pi}^^ri^;t 
Claii.sifjt;afjni| from R-10 
Residential Distiict to {PD-H2 
Planned Unit Development on 
<^tain prqicrty located 2670 feet 
mwe or less southwest of the 
intersection of London Bridge 
Ro^ and Pine View Avenue. The 
proposed zoning classification 
change to PD-H2 is for planned 
development. The comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of this 
parcel for suburban low density 
residential at densities that are 
compatible wiUi single family use 
in accordance with other Plan 
policies. Said iwircel contains 17.5 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 
CONniTTnNAL II R^ 



& 

An Ordinance upon Applicatimi 
of Alan C. Williams for a 
Conditional U.se Permit for an 
indoor recreational facility 
(batting cage) on the west side of 
General Booth Boulevard. 900 
feet more or less north of Dam 
Neck Road. Said parcel is located 
at 1489 Genial Booth Boulevard 
and contains 8 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 
9. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of P.C.S. PrimeCo. L.P., for a 
Conditional Use Ppnnit for a 150- 
foot communications tower on 
property located 800 feet more of 
less west of General Booth 
Boulevard, nordi of Dam Neck 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
1525 General Booth Boulevard 
and contains 5.490 acres. 
HIINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
10. 

An Onlinance upon Application 
of Harpers Investinents, a Virginia 
General Partnership, for a 
Conditional Use Permit for an 
automobile repair establishment 
on certain property located on die 
west side of Oceana Boulevard, 
309.07 feet souUi of Harpers Road. 
Said parcel contains 22,391 
square feet. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 
11. 

An Odinance upon Application 
of Eastern Mobile Homes, Inc.. 
for a Conditional T J.se Permit for 
mobile home sales on certain 
property located a the southeast 
comer of S. Military highway and 
Alexandria Avenue. Said parcel is 
located at 800 S. Military 
Highway and contains 30,000 
square feet more or less. , 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
12. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of P.C.S. PrimeCo. L.P.. for a 
Conditional Use perq^j t for a 150- 
foot communications tower on 
certain property located on Uie 
east side of Newtown Road. souUi 
of Lake Edward Drive. Said 
parcel is located at 500 Newtown 
Road, and contains 8.169 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
13. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of BJ's Wholesale Club for a 
Conditional Use Permit for die 
relocation of an existing 
automobile service (tire bay) on 
die north side of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, west of Rosemont 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
3712 Virginia Beach Boulevard 
and contains 10.028 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

AMENPlVfKNTS; 

14. 

Motion of Uie City of Vu-ginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Section 402 of the City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
dimensional requirements in die 
AG-1 and AG- 12 Agricultural 
Districts. More detailed 
information is available in die 
Planning D^»rtmait. 

DEFERRED BY PLANNTNff 

coMMKsins ON mium. 

15, 

An Ordinance iqxm Application 
of Armada/Hoffler Retail 
Development Company, L.L.C., 
for a Conditional Changfr ^ f 
Zoning District riqfjfjjfifatinn 
frwn M Light Industiial District 
to B-2 Community Business 
District on certain property 
located 150 feet more or less 
south of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, west of Great Neck 
Road. The proposed zoning 
claMfication change to B-2 is for 
commercial land use. The 
Cwniwehensivc PIm recommends 
use of diis parcel fw industrial 
B« in accwdancx with odier Ran 
poJKws. SaMl iwjpmy is located 
M 2437 Vii^nia Beach Boolevvd 
and IM PuAer Lne mKl cooi^ 
16.686 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH 

D Cwitbiuod On FNigo t 



wmm^^^f^^m. 



mmmtmrn^ 



imim 



D tentlniMd Prom ftgt • 

16. 

An OnUnince 1900 ^niicitfoD 
of Aim & 0. Fete KuMAm for 1 
Chingfl of ZQBiag Dtitrict 



caU the CITY CLBRK'S OPFICB 
•14274303. 

Hearing impaired, call: TDD 
only at 427-430S. (TDD • 
Te^l^wnic Device for the Deaf). 

514 
2tl2-29 



riairifleaUnn £roin 0-2 (Met 
Diitrict to B-2 community 
BuiinMi Diiblct at tto wudiweit 
corner of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and Fair Meadowi 
Road. The propoiCNd zoning 
claiiification to B-2 ii for 
commercial land use. The 
0}mprehenjilve Pbui recommendi 
uM of thii parcel for lubur^ 
medium density residential at 
densities that are compatibte with 
single family use in acconknce 
with other Plan policies. Said 
property is locked cm LoU 137, 
138 k 139 Fair Meadows and 
contains 22,498.74 square feet. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
17. 

An Odinance upon ^pUcadon 
of Target for a Conditinnai 
Change of Zoning Diitrict 
Claiiification from R-SD 
Residential Duplex District U) 
Conditional B-2 community 
Business District at the smitheast 
comer of l^incess Anne Road and 
Lynnbaven Parkway. The 
proposed zoning classification 
change to B-2 is for general 
commercial land use. The 
Comprehensive Plan recommends 
use of this parcel for suburbim 
high density residentUl at 
densities that are compatible with 
single family use in accordance 
with other Plan policies. Said 
parcel contains 19 acres. 
KEMPSVEXE BOROUGH. 
18. 

An Ordinance iqKm ^plication 
of P.C.S. PrimeCo, L.P. for a 
Conditional line Permk for a 125- 
foot communicati(ms tower on the 
east side of Baker Road, 200 feet 
mme of less north of Northampton 
Boulevard. Said parcel contains 
1.21 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
19. 

Application of Ontario 
Development. Inc., for the 
reconsideration of conditiohs 
placed on the application for a 
change of zoning from R-6 
Residential District to B-2 
Community Business District on 
March 26, 1984. Property is 
located 470 feet east of 
Kempsville Road, 260 feet south 
of Indian River Road. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

SBgUURAGfiNDA; 

CQNDmQNALUSfi PERMIT; 

20. 

An Ordinance upon ^plication 
of Mount Bethel Baptist church 
for a Conditional Use Pennit for a 

church on the east side of Indian 
River Road, north of Stumpy 
Lake Lane. Said fwrcel is located 
at 4636 Indian River Road and 
contains 4.9 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH 
MODIFICATION TO LAND 

USE PLAN: 

21. 

Application of Taylor Farm 
Associates, LLC for modification 
to the Land Use Plan for T.C.C. 
Development Corporation which 
was granted on January 14, 1985. 
Property is located on London 
Bridge Ro^ west of Pine View 
Avenue. Said parcel contains 300 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

MODIFICATION O F 
CONDITIONS: 

22. 

Application of the Virginia 
Beach Development Audu»ity for 
a modification of conditions 
attached to the rezonings which 
were granted on June 13, 1988, 
August 14, 1989, November 9, 
1993 and November 12, 1994. 
Said parcels are located on the 
south side of Dam Neck Road, 
west of General Boodi Boulevanl 
(Corpotite Landing and contain 
337 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

AMENDMENTS 

23. 

Modon of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Sectioi 206 of the City 
Zoning CMdinuce pertaining to 
minium lot vea for public and 
pivate pump stations, water tanks 
and other unmanned utility 
facilities. More detailed 
information is available in the 
Planning Dei»rtmait. 

24. 

Motion of the City of Virgmia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Section 106 (c) of d» 
City Zcming CMiniance poiai^ng 
to fees for Board of Zoning 
am)eals variances. More d^idtod 
information is available in the 
Planning Deinrtmoit. 

All interested parties are 
invited to attend. 

RobetJ. Sam 

n^nii^ Dbector 

If yon are fkftk^y SukM or 
visually im{Mired and need 
MdfiMce at diis meetinK. ptose 



r 



PubOe NoNe* 



VmOINIAj IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERKS QPnCE IN RE: 

Andre J. Queatel PUaUr 

V. Diane L. QdmsI D^iuMlant 

ORDER OF PUBLICAHON • 
CA8ENO.CH99<»54 

Tlie object of Ms suit is for 
Andre J, QuesMl to obtain a 
divorce a vinculo mttrimonii bom 
Diane L. QneAd, on the grounds 
of a one yetf wepm&oa. 

It is ORDERED dut CMane L. 
Questel an>ear ud protect h«- 
inttrest, on or before February 7, 
1996 which date is no soonn thsn 
flf^ days after mtry of diis ordtf 
cS publication. 

And it is ftoher ORDERED diat 
this order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
su»ies8ive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in diis City 
isescribed by diis court 

December 11, 1995 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By Alishia Undsey 

Deputy a«k 



On Tuesday. January 2, 1996. 
at 2:00 p.ffl. hi C(»ncil Chambm 
OB die second flo<» of die City 
HaU Bidlding. Mwridpal Center, 
Viigiaia Beach. ViigfaiU tBe City 
Council of die City of Virginia 
Beach, Vfaginia wiU hold a public 
hMTing on a Resoluticm entided 
"A Resolution Supporting 
Legislation Which Will 
Designate Real and Pwsonal 
PropsQr Owned By Conservadm, 
Inc., as Being Exonpt Firom Snte 
and Local Taxation." 
Ctmlervttion. Inc., owns no real 
or personal pitqierty loctfed in die 
City of Virginia Beach. In 1995, 
conservation. Inc. pdd no real or 
personiU I^operty taxes to die 
City of Virtfnia Beach. 

A copy of die ftill text of die 
rest^uticm is on flle in die office 
of the City Clerk, If you are 
physically disabled, hearing or 
visually impaired and will need 
assistance at diis meeting, please 
call 427-4305 Voice/TDD RuUi 
Hodges Smidi, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

12-22 



[ 



Public Nolle* 



CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 



Public Notte* I 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC 





The Council of die City of 
Virginia Beach. Virginia, will 
hold a public heuing on "nusday, 
January 2, 1996, at 2:00 p.m., 
pursuant to Section 15.1-835 of 
die Code ot Virginia, to receive 
comments form citizens on a 
proposed amendment to dw City 
Charto-. 

Specifically, the proposed 
amendment would provide that, 
beginning in 1998, School Board 
members shall be elected at the 
general election held in 
November of each year. A copy of 
die full text of die proposed 
Charter amendment is avidlable 
in the (Met of die Qty Cleric. 

The public hearing will be 
conducted in Council Chambers 
on the second floor of die City 
Hali building. Municipal Center, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
Interested persons may spptu at 
such time and place to in-esent 
dieir views. If you are physically 
disabled, hearing or visually 
impaired and will need assistance 
at diis meeting, please call 427- 
4305 Voice/TDD at least 48 hours 
prior to die meeting. 

Rudi Hodges Smidi, CMC/AAE 

12-22 

I Public Notic* 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING 




The Council of die City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, will 
hold a public hearing on Tuesday, 
January 2, 1996, at 2:00 p.m., 
pursuant to Section 15.1-835 of 
die Code of Virginia, to receive 
comments ft^m citizens on a 
proposed amendment to die City 
Chaittf. 

Specifically, the proposed 
amendment would audiwize Ac 
City of Viiguiia Beach, mb^ to 
dedgnated condititms, to exercise 
die power of condemnioion for die 
pufp<»e of initiating an economic 
development project in die area 
of the City known as Burton 
Staticm. A copy of die full text of 
die proposed Charto' amendment 
is available in die Office of the 
City Clerk. 

The public heuing will be 
conducted in Council Chambm 
on die second floor of die City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, 
Virginia Beach. Virginia. 
Interested persons may aiqiear at 
such time and place to |H«s«it 
dieir vtews. If you an phyrically 
disabled, hearing or visually 
impured md will 1^ assistant 
at diis meeting, i^eaw call 427- 
4305 Voice/TDD tt least 48 tours 
priw to die meting. 

Rudi HodgM Smidi, CMC/AAE 
12-22 

PubHc N^lc* 
CITY CM» VIRGINIA BEACH 




On Tuesday, January 2, 1996, 
at 2:00 p.m. in Council Chfunbers 
on die second floor of die City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia die City 
Council of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia will hold a public 
hearing on a Resolution entided 
"A Resolution Supporting 
Legislation Which Will 
Designate Real and Personal 
Property Owned By Virginia 
Beach Technical and Career 
Education Foundation, Inc., as 
Being as Being Exempt From 
State and Local Taxation." 
Virginia Beach Technical and 
Career Education Foundation, 
Inc.. currentiy owns no real or 
pwsonal property located in the 
City of Virginia Beach. In 1995. 
Virginia Beach Technical and 
Career Education Foundation, 
Inc.. paid no real or personal 
propoty taxes on any property it 
currendy owns; it paid $380.50 in 
real estate taxes on property it no 
lon^ owns. 

A copy of die full text of die 
resolution is on file in die office 
of die City Clerk. If you are 
physically disabled, hearing or 
visually impaired and will need 
assistance at diis meeting, please 
call 427-4305 Voice/TDD Rudi 
Hodges Smidi. CMC/AAE 
City Clerk 
12-22 

Public None* 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of die City 
Council of die City of Virginia 
Beach will be held in die Council 
Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center, 
Princess Anne Station, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on Tuesday, 
January 9, 1996 at 3:00 p.m.. at 
which time the following 
aiq>lication will be heard: 

1. 

An Ordinance to amend and 
reordain Chapter 33 of the City 
Code by adding a new Section 
33-114.3. pertaining to 
administrative approval of certain 
encroachments in the B-3A 
Pembroke Central Business Core 
district. More detailed information 
is available in the Planning 
DefMUtmenL 

SUBDIVISIQN VARIANCE: 

PtJNr.QBORniJOH 

Z 

Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the 
Subdivision Ordinance, 
Subdivision for Elvin Ray &. 
Hester L. Waterfield. Property is 
located at 2037 Munden Point 
Road. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

PRINCESS ANNE BOROIJfiH 

3. 

Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the 
Subdivision Ordinance, 
Subdivision for Michael A 
Patricia Nelson. Property is 
located at 2741 West Landing 
Road. PRINCESS ANNE 
BGkOUQK 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION; 

4. 

An Or^mmce iqxn A|^lication 
(tf JaKM B. Cowan for a Change 
of Zoning Diatrict ClMgifiMtinn 
firom A- 18 Aiwtmrat District to 
R-5S Residential Single Family 
District on certain property 
located at the northwest 
interMcdon of Lincoln A^^ue 
Md Alabama Avenue. The 



propowd zoning classification to 
R-SS is for single family 
residential land um on lots no 
ieis dm 5,000 iqutte feet. Hie 
Comi»idimsive pl«i reconnmids 
use of this pvcel for urban 
medium low (toority residratial tt 
dmsitiM diM «e compatible witt 
use in accordance widi odier Han 
policies. Said parcel contains 
19,000 square feet. PRINCESS 
ANNEBC^OUOH, 

KHMWynTRROPniT^H 

5, 

An Ordnance upon Application 
of Vir^nia Beach Investment 
Company for a p^nditionai 
Changfl of Zoniiiy DUtrif.t 
Claiiification from B-2 

Community Business District to 
Conditional A-24 Apartment 
Disti-ict on die west side of 
College Parte Boulevard, 245 feet 
north of Auburn Drive, The 
proposed zoning classification 
change to A-24 is for muldfamUy 
land use at a density no greater 
than 24 units per acre. The 
Comprehensive Plan recommends 
use of diis parcel for office use in 
accordance with other Plan 
policies. Said parcel contains 
11,13 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
B0R0LK3H 
CONDITIONAL USE PRRMTT- 

BAYSIDE BQROUfiH 

6, 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Ultimate Country Club, LLC, 
for a Condidonal iIm P#imiit for 
an indoor recreation^ facility on 
die nortii side of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, east of Newtown 
Road, Said parcel is located at 
5600 Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
#101, #102, «103, and contains 
3.5 acres, BAYSIDE BOROUGH, 

KEMPSVILLE BOROIir.H. 

7, 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Kempsville Conservative 
Synagogue for a Conditional Ilie 
Permit for a child care center in a 
religious facility on certain 
property located at die norihem 
terminus of Indian Lakes 
Boulevud. Said parcel is located 
at 952 Indian Lakes Boulevard 
and contains 3.658 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH, 

PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH 

8. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Staliings Oil Company for a 
Conditional llae Permit for 
gasoline pumps in conjection widi 
a convenience store and a car 
wash on certain prqierty located 
at the soudieast comer of Dam 
Neck Road and General Boodi 
Boulevard. Said parcel contains 
1.556 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGR 

9. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Thomas H. Wilkinson for a 
Conditional Use Permit for bulk 
Storage on the south side of 
Holland Road, east of Rosemont 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
3565 Holland Road and contains 
19 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGR 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

10. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Jahn W. & Leslie T. Summs for 
a Conditional Use Permit for a 
bed and breakfast inn at die 
southwest como' of church Point 
Road and Meeting House Road. 
Said parcel is located at 4001 
Church Point Road and contains 
2.7 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGR 

STUEET CLOSURES: 

VIRGINIA BE^CH BOROIJfiH 

11. 

Application of R. Lewis Boggs 
for the discontinuance, closure 
and abandonment of a portion of 
Baltic Avenue beginning at a 
point 300 feet soudi of Laskin 
Road and running in a 
soudiwesterly direction along die 
eastern prc^rty line a distance of 
842.52 feet more or less to die 
western boundary of Holly Road. 
Said parcel is variable in widdi 
and contains 1.131 acres. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

12. 

Application of R. Lewis Boggs 
for the discontinuance, closure 
and at)and(mment of the folkiwing 
parcels: 

Parcel 1: Alleyway located 
between 29di Street and 30di 



^iTillll lff^f^ ? "»• ^^- December 22. 1995 9 
detailed informatitm is available ^ 



hi die banning DeptrtmeRt, 

14. 

Motion' of die aty of Virgiaia 
Beach to amend and recraaln 
Ardcte n, ampva 30 of die code 
of die City of Virginia Beach, 
Vi^nia, pottMiw to boROw pto, 
More deulled information 



in the 



is 
Planning 



available 
D^artmem. 

15. 

Modon of tiw Qty of V^inia 
Beach to amend and reordain 
Sections 111 and 227 of die City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
borrow pits. More detailed 
information is available in die 
Planning Dqiartment 

16. 

Modon of die City (tf Virginia 
Beach to amend Article 13 of die 
City Zoning (Minance to pwmit 
certain light commercial uses as 
a conditional use widiin the 
Historic and Cultural district. 
More deulled information is 
available in the Planning 
Departmrat 

17. 

Motion of die City (tf Virginia 
Beach to amend Article 2 of die 
City Zoning Ordinance by adding 
Section 225.1 perudning to bed 
and breakfast inns. More detailed 
information is available in die 
Planning Department 

18. 

Kfotion of die City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Sections 111 and 232.1 
of die City Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to bed and breakfast 
inn. More detailed information is 
available jn the Planning 
Department. 

19. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of The Franciscus Company, Inc., 
for an amendment to a 30 acre 
site of dte Green Run Land Use 
Plan, The proposal is to 
redesignate 7,5 acres from 
multiple family to commercial ot 
multiple family. The site is 
located on the north side of 
Princess Anne Road, 400 feet 
more or less east of S. 
Independence Boulevard and 
contains 30 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGR 

All interested parties are 
invited to attend. 

Rudi Hodges Smidi, CMC/AAE 

City Cleric 

If you arc physically disabled or 
visually Impaired and need 
assistance at diis meeting, please 
call the CITY CLERK'S OFFICE' 
at 427-4303. 

Hearing impaired, call: TDD only 
at 427-4305. (TDD - Telephonic 
Device for the Deaf). 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



Street beginning at the western 
boundary of Arctic Avenue and 
running in a westerly direction to 
the eastern boundary of Holly 
Roui. 

EmbsUL Alleyway located 
140.15 feet nordi of 27di Street 
beginning at die eastran bCHindary 
of IfoUy Road ami running in an 
easterly direction a distance of 
49.93 feet Said parcels cwtain 
6086.45 square feet VIRGINIA 
BEACH BCmOlKSR 

AMBWDhffiNTS: 

13. 

Motion of the City of Virginia 
BeKh to amend and reo^in 

S«:tions ^1 and 601 of dw Qty ceeding in a nor^MMnty dfa«ct 
Zoning (^dinance pertaining to ion along dw Mstera rt^t of 
use regidatiaw t(x flsh pmb md way Ihie m m Uwp P oved podioa (tf 
flsh hatchra^ in die residential I>qxnt Cucte ^o^ a ^r^ widi 
and apvtflMnt districu. More a radius of 415.00* u «c (Us- 



PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, diat 
at die meeting of die City Coun- 
cil of die City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, to be held on die 9di 
day of January, 1996, at 2:00 
p.m,. at die City Hall of die City 
of Virginia Beach, at Princess 
Anne, die unctenigned will peti- 
tion die Council for die appoint- 
ment of Viewers to view the 
below described portion of a 
certain street and to report to die 
City Council whether in die 
opinion of die Viewers, what if 
any, inconvenience would result 
from the vacating, closing and 
discontinuance of same, die said 
portion of said street being de- 
scribed as follows: 
EXHIBIT "A" 

UNIMPROVED RIGHT OF 
WAY ADJACENT TO LOTS 7 
AND 8, BLOCK 19, PLAT OF 
SECTION "B" OF OCEAN 
PARK ALL THAT CERTAIN 
PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND 
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING 
IN THE BAYSIDE BOROUGH 
OF VIRGINIA BEACH, VIR- 
GINIA designated "UNIMPRO- 
VED m/ 1596.7 SQ. FT" on diat 
plat entitled "EXHIBIT A" 
SHOWING PART OF UNIM- 
PROVED RIGHT OF WAY OF 
DUPONT CIRCLE TO BE 
CLOSED AND EXCESS PRO- 
PERTY TO BE ACQUIRED 
•OCEAN PARK,' Bayside Bor- 
ough, Virginia Beach, Virginia," 
prepared by T.E.S., Inc. dated 
11/27/95, which parcel is more 
particularly described as begin- 
ning at a point along die northon 
right of way line of DiqxNit Circle 
at dK southeaston comer of Lot 
7, Block 19, Plat of Section "B" 
of Ocean Paric. and firom said 
Point of Beginning, followi^ dM 
nordion right of way line of an 
unimproved portion of Dupont 
Circle in a southwest»ly direct- 
ion along a curve widi a radius of 
400.00° m arc distance (tf 151.62 
feet to a pt^t iA»g the soudioii 
btwndary tf Lot 8, Bk>dc 19. Hat 
of Section "B" of O^aa Pirt; 
Aence turning ami proosed^ in 
a sottdiwMtoiy (UfBctfoe rioog a 
cnr/t widi a radiu of IXW an 
arc distaice of 52.93 fwt 10 a 
point: thence turning and pro- 



tauM o^ 81.73 feet U) a point; 
dienceproceeding in a north- 
easterly dlreetta along a curve 
wldi a radius tf 150.00* an wc 
diMuice of 18.95 (iset to a point; 
thence ^oceedlng in a ntntb- 
MSto'ly direct along a curve 
widi a radius of 15.00* m arc 
(Usttnce ot 9.70 feet to die Point 
ofB^lnntaig. 

At thtt tiflM, any(»e affected 
may tppux and be heard. After 
die npon of Uie viewws is 
recieved, at the next regular 
meeting of dte City CoundU, or as 
soon diereaftN as die matter may 
be placed on die agenda, the 
undersigned wiU Petition die City 
Council to vacate, close and 
discontinue die portion of diat 
street in die City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, desoibed tbowt. 
AMERICAN-OCEANIC 
COATING CORPORATION 

By: Edvrard Bouden. Ot Com- 
cil 

R, Edwfrds Bourdtm Jr. 

SYKES, CARNES. BOURDON 
&AHERN.P.C. 

Pembroke One. The Fifth Floor 

Virginia Beach. Virginia 
23462-2980 

(804) 499-8971 

50-7 
2+12-22 



C 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



] 



1[ 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE 

IN RE: Vidti Yvonne Pradco 

Plaintiff(s) 

V. William Roy Pradco 

Defendant(s) 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION • 
CASENO.CH95-3809 

The object of diis suit is (for): 
the said plaintiff to obtain a 
divorce A Vinculo Matrimonii 
from die said defendant upon dw 
grounds of having lived separate 
and apart without any coha- 
bitation and widiout any inter- 
ruption for a period in excess of 
one year, to wit 8 yean. 

It is ORDERED diat William 
Roy Pradco appear and protect 
(his) interest on or before Jan- 
uary 11, 1996. which date is no 
sooner than fifty days after entry 
of diis order of publication. 

And it is furdier ORDERED 
that diis order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in Virginia 
Beach Sun. a newspaper of gen- 
eral circulation in diis City pre- 
scribed by diis court 

November 20. 1995 

J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By PhyUis N. Styron 

Deputy Clerk 

, 48-3 

PUBLIC NOTICE | 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE 

INRE: 

Denise Lemire 

Plaintiff(s) 

V. Roger J, Lemire. Jr, 

Defendant(s) 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION - 
CASENO.Ch95-1765 

The object of this suit is (for): 
Plaintiff to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from the 
Defendant on die grounds of one 
year sei»ration. 

It is ORDERED diat Roger J. 
Lemire, Jr. appear and protect his 
interest, on or befav January 30. 
1996 which date is no sooner dian 
fifty days after entry of diis order 
of publication. 

And it is furdier ORDERED 
that this mder of publication l>e 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in die Virginia 
Beach Sun a newspaper of 
general circulation in this City 
prescribed by diis court 

December 4, 1995 

By J. CURTIS FRUIT. CLERK 

By Alisha Lindsey 

Deinity Cleric 

504 
4+1-5 



Public Notic* 



Auction: 1985 BUICK 
SKYLARK (6844) 

Serial Number: 

lG4XBe9R5FW427303 

Auction Date: JANUARY 2. 
1996 

Time: 11 a.m. at Norfolk Motor 
Company, 7000 N. Nfilitary Hwy, 
NOTfoUtVa 23518. 

NcKfcdk Motor Qmqiany reser^s 
die ri^t to t»d. 

51-2 
ltl2-22 



Public No«c« 



AiKticm: 1983 OLDSMOBILE 
98(5030) 

Serial Number. 

1G3AW®Y2DM927322 

Auction Date: JANUARY 2. 
1996 

Time: 1 1 a.ffi. M hforfolk Motor 
Qwipany, 7000 N. KfiUtary Hwy, 
Ndffoik,Va 23518, 

Norfcflt Moicv Cmqiny r^wes 
die right 10 Ud. 

51-1 
Itl2-22 



■■JLJJJUf.JL.'^.JLJ.. 



mmmmmm^^^ 



M ViwMitteadt Sm Bb^y. December 22. 1995 




Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 






CLASSIFIED AD MAIL- IN FORM 



AFmCLES FOR SALE 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

itime 
2 times 
4Mnes 



20 Words 
or less 

$ 7.50 
$13.50 
$22.50 



MdUtiaoal 
words 

.35 

.70 

1.40 



Run your Classified Ad four times for only $22.50. You can cancel 
your ad at any time. 

All Classified Ads run in three newspapers (The Virginia Bead) Sun, The Chesap- 
eake Post and The Portsmouth Times). No addition^ charge. 



Please print cleaily using only one word per box. 



20 words 



Run my ad for 

Payment is enclosed $ . 



issues. 



Make clwck payable to Byeriy Piibilcatlom 
MAIL TO: Classified. Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23327 

Name 

Address 

City 

FOR HELP with your Classified Ad. please call 547-4571 . 

COMBMATION RATE: Run um (am* penonal ad In any oltwr Byarly PubUcatbni netnpaper tor an 
atfMoiul 13 on* tkna, tS tw tfnai, $7 tour timM. Nmapapait In FranMIn, Ernporla, LawsncavM*. 
DhMriddii and PtIMbuig. Cat 547-4571 tor (Mate. * 



AIRUNE TICKETS 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



One way, anytime, anywhere in 
U.S. $300. Roundtrip no advance 
for $425. Call 1-800-925-4704 

1/5 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



SPAMSH SPEAKERS 

People with contacts in Latin 
America wanted to cash in on 
International Markets. Call 499^ 
4133. 1/5/96 

i Lavern Williams Morris as o1 
12/4/95 am no longer respon8it)le 
for any dri)t8 other than my own. 

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY 
B)& JEAN RICHARDS! 

LOVE BRUCE, M.J. 4 SAKI 

SELECTIVE SINGLES DANCE 
EVERY MONDAY! 

Dating services are not for usi 
Biggest singles party in Tidewater 
for the over 28 career singles. 
7:00 til mldn^ht. Dress casual I Tell 
a single friend! Mitty's, Omni 
Newport News Hotel. $5. l-64€xit 
258-A. 804-249-5452, Lila. 
12/29 

I 




"DONATE"CARS" 

"BOATS"RVS" 

"TRUCKS" 

Jewish Heritage for the Blind. Tax 

deductible. Promfri pick-up. 

NEED NOT RUN. 

1-800-2-DONATE 

1-800-236-6283 

" DONT DRINK THE WATER" 

Counter top water treatment 
system. Filters out Chlorine, lead 
and many other common water 
pollutants dp to 10.000 gallons. 
NTL tested. 99% reduction 
Guaranteed. Easy to install. 
Christmas special 199.95 includes 
shipping and handling. Please 
send check or money order to 
Damon P.O. Box 62382 Va 
Beach, Va 23466 or call 579- 
1452, for free home demo. 
12/29 

Mormons. JW's, Masonry, New 
Age; What do they really t>eHeve? 
For free booklet call CorperStone 
Minfetries at 1-868-0793. 

$ SAVE $ SLASH YOUR 
GROCERY BILL^ BY UP TO 50%. 

CALL FOR DETAILS: 804-340- 
5234. 




AUTO SERVICE 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



BALDWIN TOWING 

Rat bed servk» $30 

Days 545-6002, 

Evenings, beeper 578-9581 

Jur* cars bought $50 & up. 



1« 



CHILD CARE 



<SREAT Bf«>QE AREA- ChiM care 
in my home, all t^s. Full-time, 
Part-time. Meals & snacks 
provMed. Plenty d aaivitns, fully 
supervised, Licensed/ insured, 
non-smoker. Quality care in a 
famNy home. Call anytime 482- 
4265 or 51 9-4(S7, pa^r. 1 2/22 



CLEANING / JANITORIAL SVC 



Cleankig- Professional leaning, at 
reasonable rates, move out 
wnttows. CaH Ele 484-4336. 

12/29 



Santa for Christmas 

private parties, 

house visits 

4 yrs. experience at 

Lynnhaven Mall. 

CaB 471^6-05 wk. 427-4433 

12/22 

Disc jockeys available for 
Christmas & New years parties, 
wedding receptbns etc. Starting 
at $175, contact Rose or Durant at 
857-7749. Gospel groups 
available for fund raisers. Bands 
also avaiW>to. 12/22 

For house calls & partiM 
Call 543-7447 

12^2 



PAINTING / DECORATING 



HSMTAGE PAMTMQ CO. 

huertors, Exterio«, 

Power WashM^, Decks, 

SheM Botk Impairs, ^meMi^. 

Ucensed/ Ifmnd 

FreeEMiHMss 

E»»llence Is our trademwk 

4it4Mt 



ANTIQUES / COLLECTIBLES 



ANTIQUES- 10,000 SQUARE FT. 

of artglass, furniture, paintings, 

ckx^s, much morel 

Open 10-5 

1804 Granby St. 

622-0005 dir. 

1/12 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



Ferrari- 1988- 328 red. 

$3,000 dollar stereo, telephone, 
radar.- 17,000 miles, excellent 
condition. 46,000. Bob 804-295- 
8040. 



AUTOS /JUNK -WANTED 



D&D TOWING 

Professional wrecker services, 
AAA approved- 24 hours. Local 
tows $25.00. Cash for cars any 
condition. Licensed/ Certified/ 
Insured. Call DO TOW ME (368- 
0963) 



$$ CASH PAID $$ 

For vehicles. 1980 and up, with 
bad engines, bad transmJssnns or 
wrecked. Some exceptions. Call 
456-0057. 1/5 

AAA-1 AUTO JUNK 

Junked or wrecked call for top 
prices. Ihr. pickup. 545-600 2. 

AUT(» ACCEPTED 

any make, year or condition 

TOP$$$ 

FAST FREE TOWINGI 

545-2821 

1/5 

JUNK CARS 

Ped( Recycling now buying whole 
cars at Elm Ave. Ports. VA. Call 
399-4075 for info. 1/5 



BUILDING MATERIALS 



PRE-ENGINEERED STEEL 
BLDGS. FACTORY SAVINGS. 
24X30, 36X36, 48X66, AND 
80X125. LIMITED SUPPLY. 
RESERVE YOURS NOW. CALL 
547-3323. .^___^ 

METAL BUILDING MANUFAC- 
TURER SELECTING SMALL OR 
LARGE BUILDER/ DEALER IN 
SOME OPEN AREAS. HIGH 
PROFIT POTENTIAL. 

ACCEPTING ONLY THE BEST 
QUALIFIED. CALL (303) 758- 
4135, EXT. 1500. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 




PERSON WANTED- to own and 

operate retail candy shop in 
Virginia Beach area. For 
informatbn call Mrs. Burden's 
Gourmet C«idy Company, Dallas, 
TX (214) 991-8239. 12/29 

Steel building busine^f is 
boomingll National Manufacturer 
Is qualifying dealers in select open 
markau. Big prafHs on s^m and/ 
or conMructnn. Call (303) 759- 
3200, axt. ^00. 

Executive Search- A wall 
established health care company 
opens new divi^n poised In the 
Preventive Health Care Market. 
Seeking several individuals to 
he^ up expansion in TtOmntfr 
area. For informatten send rMume 
to: Kim Murphy, Pmummi, 1719 
Birch Trail Circle, Suite E. 
Chesapetfce, Va. 2S320. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



HELP WANTED 



HELP WANTED 



GokJ/ silver Plating Mwhine 
all supplies and training $895. 
CaH 704-888-2481. 12/29 

Bassinet white only 2 1« months 
$30. Call Julie work 547-4571 
home 398-0902. tfn 

Pine Thomasville dinning room 
table and chairs, 2 arm chairs, all 
chairs with padding plus 2 extra 
leaves for table. $1000 or best 
offer. 482-1428. tfn 

Daybed - White iron & bnas, W/2 
Orthopedk: Mattress, still in plastk:, 
pop up trundle. Cost $ 800 sell for 
$325. Call 481-6748. 

Bed Brass - Queen size with 
orthopedic mattress set. Still in 
plastK. Cost $1,000 sell for $300. 
Call 481-7191. 



Extraordinary career opp- 
ortunity. Available wHh the 
fastest growing telecomm- 
unlcattons company In America. 
Motivtied self starters, who desN 
their own business needed 496- 
9037. 

MUSICAL instruments - 
RETAIL 

Mkf-slzed, drums and percussion 
spedatty store ojnsidering investor 
and/or co-owner for expansion. 
Excellent growth potential 426- 
2^3. 12«9 



CLASSES / SCHOOLS 



Amipany Drivers WSntsd 

How wouM ^u like a job wrtiere 
you operate your own truck as if 
you ware an owner-c^Jerator but 
without trud( paymerits, repairs, 
Insurance, penults, road use taxes 
or any of the usual pn^toms trying 
to exist as an owner-operator in 
today's industry. What If your truck 
was a 199 full dress, conventtonal, 
KW walk-in sleeper alls the bells 
and whistles. 25 cants a mile, 
percent of profits, health 
insurance, 401 K, home several 
times a week and weekends. 
Good NVR, 2 years verlfiabie over 
the road experience. Call Ope 1- 
800-903-2K1. 1/12 



Train to be Aviation Mechante 

in Pampano Beach, FL 

For January 29th class, 60 weeks 

Training. Financial akf 

and housing available. 

Job placement assistance 

Call Pompano Academy 

1-800-545-7262 

12/29 



BARMASTERS OF VA BEACH 
Bartending eehool 
1141 Independence Blvd. 1-2 wks 
day / evening classes Job/ place- 
ment assistance. Lowest tuitbn in 
area. For Free Class / 464-0500. 

1/12 



Owner Operators Wanted 

Large intermodel carrier needs 5 

professional for over the road 

operation. 

Home weekends • Paid weekly • 

No escrow • No unloading • one 

on one dispatch 

2200 • 2800 miles weekly. We 

require 25 years of age or older, 2 

years over the road experience, 

and a good NVR. Call Joe 1-800- 

903-2621. 1/12 



We are kx>king tor a few energetk 
people to sell subscriptions to 
three local publications. If 
intewsted call Julie at 547-4571. 

TELEPHONE SALES 

Established business in Great 

BrMge area of Chesapeake is 

seeking full-time or part-time 

telephone solicitors. Experience 

prefered, but not necessary. You 

must have good spelling ability, 

legible handwriting and an 

intelligent willingness to learn. 

Most important you must enjoy 

dealing with the public by 

telephone . You should live in or 

near the Great Bridge area. Salary 

Is based on hours worked. If 

interested, please write fully, giving 

your qualifk:ations to: Telephone 

Solicitor. P.O. box 1327, 

Chesapeake, Va. 23327. 

MARKETING 

International brokerage firm has 5 

openings. Applicants must be fun 

& people oriented. Unlimited 

potential $50,000 + Call 423- 

7275. 



COINS / STAMPS / HOBBIES 



THE PERFECT JOB 
Set your own hours full/ part time. 
For unique home service 
company. Direct sales/ real estate 
experience a plus. Call HSA 497- 
1040. 1^5 



HOMES /SALE 



BUY SELL COINS - Gokf & Silver 
items. Military items & o|her 
collectibles. Collectors Choice, 
5441 Va. Beach Blvd. 497-5950. 

1/12 



ENTERTAINMENT 



DRIVERS 

$HOUDAYCASH$ 

$150 PER DAY 
Earning Potential 

Work your own hours. Be your 
own boss. Must be 23 yrs. Good 
DMV record. Norfolk Checker Taxi, 
855-9009, ask for Bob Jones. 



CLUB ESCORT 

Beautiful girls for all occasions 

providing alternative entertainment 

for the definith/e male. 

548-9697 

Hiring men and women. 

. 1/5 

ALL STARZ ENTERTAINMENT 

High class ladies for private 
parties, dancing, dining, massage 
and morel DON'T HESITATE 
CALL FOR THE BEST. 499-0865 



PAY 
ATTENTION 

Last year I graduated from 
college and was frustrated with the 
lack of opportunities in todays job 
market. Then I met a mijlnnalre 
and my last months check was 
over $3,000.00! 5 career minded 
indivMuals needed nowl Call 468- 
2173. 



AFTER 6 437-0692 

MALE/FEMALE MODELS PER- 
FORMING THE HOTTEST SHOW 
YOU'VE EVER SEENIII ALSO 
CAPTIVATING LINGERIE SHOWS 
AND ESCORTS NOW 
AVAILABLE!!! CLUBS/ PRIVATE 
PARTIES. DON'T CALL THE 
REST- WE'VE GOT THE BEST! 

1/12 



NOW STAFFING 

International company expanding 
into Tidewater area, need reps/ 
trainers/ managers. Extensive 
training provided, opportunity for 
travel available. 468-0890. 12/15 



FORECLOSURE SALE, 3 
bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, 1513 
McDaniel st. Portsmouth 
$75,000.00. ALL OFFERS 
CONSIDERED, Low Down Low 
Payment Financing, 

METROPOLITAN MORTGAGE, 
1800-541-0828 EXT 515, ASK 
FOR BOB GUNNING. 1/5 

DAVIDSMILL CHESAPEAKE- 

Nearly, new 4 bedroom ranch w/ 
garage on 1/4 acre lot. Western 
Branch schools. 129,900 Alice 
Watson 523-2121 or 721-3012. 
Century 21 >\ccor d. 

Norfolk Highlands- 1116 nWhom 
Dr. New custom built. 3 bedroom, 
2 bath, attach garage, 
maintenance free. Brick skirted, 
vaulted ceilings, recess lighting. 
Open house Sat's & Sun's 1-4. 
Pefley Real Estate Corp. 425- 
6916 or 629-9992. 

U .1 

ALL CLOSING COST PAID 

on any VA/HUD owned home, vet 
or non-vet. Bobby Scott & 
Associates Real Estate 490-7826. 



LOANS /MORTGAGES 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

Hiring IMMEDIATELY, will train. 
flexible shifts starting at 5, 5:30 & 
6 pm. Incentive raises & new 
employee bonus. Lynnhaven 
area. Call Nancy 468-4002. 



FARM /LAND /TIMBER 



95+ acre farm for sale in 

Jerusalem Distrtet, Southampton 

County, Vliginia, on Unity Road 

and Mnston Church Ftoad. If 

interested, call (804) 562-5133. 



FIREWOOD /FUELS 



Firewood- 95% oak cut, split $ 
delivered. 1 ton pk:kup. Call 804- 
860-8046. 1/5 



HELP WANTED 



THE PERFECT JOB 

$400 a we^ full time, 

several pec^le needed to do 

promotional work in the 

exciting photograph field. 

No experience necessary. 

We train. Call 423-8506 

1/5 



TRAIN TO BE AVIATION 
MECHAMC IN POMPANO BEACH 
FL FOR JANUARY 28TH CLASS, 
60 WEEKS,. TRAINING, 
FINANCIAL AID AND HOUSING 
AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT 
ASSISTANCE 1-M0-S45-7M2. 
______^ 12/29 

COMMUNICATIONS-Natnnal firm, 
expanding in Tidewater area. 
Seeking sharp, highly motivated 
indivkJuals with good pubik: skills. 
Call 368-0848. 

Brand New Office 

All posittons to staff entire office, 
17 people needed immediately 
WE TRAIN II! Must be 18 or okJer, 
have car and available now. If 
you're not making $7/hr. Call Ron 
at 466-8580. 



NEWSPAPER 
EOITOR/REPORTER 

Immediate positton available at 
Dinwiddle Monitor, a weekly 
community newspaper near 
Petersburg. Journalism degree 
required, exper. preferred, 
knowledge of AP style a plus. 
Competlthre starting salary, gas 
allowance. Relocation to 
community required. Serious 
inquiries only. Ser^J resume to Mr. 
Brcw»n, P.O. Box 497. Frai*lln, VA 
a851. 1^ 



SECURITY - Armed officers, Mtfe 

.registered, full and part time 

avaHiMe. Call 362-^48. 12^ 






Experieroed. 4^-2631 ext. 401. 
anytfme. ig/gg 



m^TAURANTOttHnt 

The WcMiden Nickel, /kf^ly in 
peraon oi%. 461-^2. 

12^ 



COLLECTORS 

For law firm 

Experience required. 

Part-time evenings and Saturdays 

Call Mrs. Stampe 4M-6292. 



"* HOI HOI HO!"* 
TELEMARKEmO-CALL 

Don't Wait Until After The 
Holkiays. Earn Your $$$ NOW. 
Seeking enthusiastic individuais 
with a great phone voce ar^ a 
personality to match. Permanent 
Part time PosKtone with Day and 
Evenlr^ hours avail^le. PaM 
Trakikig mi Da^ $$$ IncenthMS. 
Call 388-(S^. 



TEXAS REFINERY COftf>.. needs 
mature (r^xHWbte) |Mraon.r»w 
in CHESAPEAKE area. 
RegantoM erf training, write W.B. 
HopWns. t^. w-a3K, Box 711. 
R. Worth. TX. 76101. 



ATTBITK3N HOME OWNERS! 

It's time to get your finances in 
order. ONCE & FOR ALL. NO UP- 
FRONT FEES nor equity in home 
necessary. CALL US NOW. 24/hr. 
day 7 days a week for immediate 
service. HOME EQUITY 
MORTGAGE INC. 800-884-4365 

1/12 

HOME OWNERS 

We have the best 

rates In town. 

All credit considered. 

1st, 2nd, 3rd Mortgages. 

Very Low Payments 

Consolkjate Bills. 

No Equity? 

Bankruptcy OKI 

Call 1-800-664-6779 

Bill or Lewis 

INFINITY FUNDING CORP. 

12/22 

FAST CASH 
for HOMEOWNERS 

All credit considered. 
1st, 2nd, 3rd hfortgages. Low 
rates. Low payments. 
Conmlkfato bills. 

Ito Equity? 

Bankru(kcy OK. 

Call 1-800-913-9816 

Jeff Rusch 

UNITED SOUTHERN MORTGAGE 

1/5 



KF 



-..varing 

mteleidmg 

»»»ii, I'm tl^ rt 

p^e wlw 

INweacAMitoU 

n' 'tedtoi^n. I 

^ nm Mb 
and tftvtteo a 

i of 

y> tre 
E...donlwtat«my 

7ur$. Seriou? 







^'^•^^mm 



im^^m^im^i^mm 



Vindnia Beach Sun. Bridav. Decwnbcf 22. 199S 11 



Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



LOST /STRAYED 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CURRITUCK COUNTY- 5 choice 
building lots. Soma wooded. Near 
the Cotton Qln at Jarvisburg. 
Priced to sell. $18,500 ea. Bill 
Robbins 1-919-453-2126 days 1- 
91 9-453-6950. eves. 12^9 



MASSAGE 



ABSOLUTELY OMNE 

Therapeutic massage now 
available at super convenient 

Chesapeake locationi 

ProfMSlonal, ABMP Certified. 

GIFTCERTIFICATESI 

Call Paula 437-0921 or 629-7838 

pager. 

MASSAGE BY TMJ 

Carpal Tunnel, headaches, back 
pains, whiplash, arthritis, hernias, 
chronic pains, fatigue, hip/ leg 
problems. Aaron 428-6923, Emily 
747-0365. 12/29 



MISC FOR SALE 



KILLR0ACHE8I 
ENFORCER. OverNlta Roach 
Spray or OverNita Past Control 
Conoantrata. Makes up to 2 
galktna for fast and lasting roaoh 
control. OUARANTEEDI Available 
at DAIL'8 HOME CENTER AND 
ROBBIES HOME CENTER. 

12/29 



MOBILE HOMES /SALE 



2 Bedroom Furnlahad 

Portsmouth area $ 3,000 cash or 
$ 1,000 and $ 200 for 12 months , 
12 wide. Call 485-3712 or 804- 
262-0604. 12/22 

Skyllna 81^ 14 x 80, 3 bedroom, 
2 bath. Calling fans throughout, 
refrlgarator, stove, serstnad 
porch, fenced, shed, wash/ dry 
possible, 20,500. Call 545-9190. 

Cliyten* 91 2 bedrooms, 2 full 
baths, hot tub In master bedroom. 
Central heat & PJO, Inside Just 
ramodalad. Must sea $18,000. 
919-232-3816. 

B^ baautlfui doublewida. 

Only 1200 down. 

Only 1288 par month. 

Only one to sell. 

Call 804-249-0764 

sp 36k apr 9.7 tim 300 

Oakwood Homas. 1/6 

M^to Homa FInanoa Co. 

Has money to land 

No p^nts. No etosing oost. 

$790 down will guarantee you a 

homa . 1st. Time Buyer Program. 

Call 804-248-0764. 

OiJawod Homaa 1^ 

1995 3 BR Repo 

Assume pmts. of only $215. 

And move in today. 

Call 804-249-0764. 

sp 18.5k tim 180 dp 1000 apr 

1 1 .0. Oakwood Homes. 1 m 



MOBILE HOME SITES 



COLONIAL RUN MOBILE HOME 
P/UIK • Vacant spaces- Rants av- 
eraging $237 • $252 monthly. 
Sites available now. 804-464- 
0770. 12/15 



MOTORCYCLES 



WE BUY USED HARLEY8II 

S0UTH8IDE HARLEY DAVIDSON 

499-8964. 

1/19 



HARLEYS WANTEDIII 
Cash for your HARLEYS todayl 
Top dollar paid for good clean 
HARLEYS. take the hassle out of 
Mlltng your HARLEY. I will come 
to you. Caah paid for Info on 
HARLEYS for sale. Call CHAD at 
Hampton Roads Harl^- OmWaon, 
804-887-6549. and Peninsula 
804-248-5221. Mon-Frl. 9-7, 8« 
9-5. Va. DIr. ia>22 

CASH 

TOP DOLLAR PA© 

^ metor^es, water c^, ATVs 

$ 4 wiMatora. Will pl(^ up « your 

loeaMM. Call anytime. Laa^ 

numaga I no ansMwr. 

Sr^M^Spwts 

910-272-9827 



MOTORCYCLES 



CAT. OLD QREAT NECK RD. 
AREA -$800 REWARD 

•pickatt" Black, white paws, white 
on face and stomach, male, 
neutered, declawed, shorthaired. 
No collar. Lost 8/6. Call Roy or 
Deborah. 340-7484 or 651-6513 
or 650-1 124 or 855-3071 . 1/5 



1993 Honda Gold Wlng/As- 
pancada. Black. 8629 original 
mitos. $11,000 negotiable. Call 
^9-9132 bafora 9 pm. tfnst 



PERSONALS 



ADOPTION 

I am an adorable 3 year old 
looking for a newborn brother or 
sister to share my loving parents 
and beautiful home. Twins 
welcome. Please call Bob & Lisa 
anytime 1-800-619-2186. 1/5 

ADOPTION 

Young happily married couple who 
cannot have chlMren wishes to 
adopt baby. WILL SHARE 
PHOTOS, LETTERS AS CHILD 
GROWS, IF DESIRED. Will pay 
medical, legal expenses. Miriam 
and Jeff 1-800-484-3253 code 
3103. 1/5 

Adopt: Devoted caring couple 
wishes to give an Infant a loving 
home. We guarantee a bright and 
happy future. Legal / Medical 
paM. Please call Denise & Rocco 
1-800-428-1901. 12/29 

ADOPTION 

Happily marrlad couple, unable to 
have children, wishes to adopt 
newborn. A happy home with lots 
of love and aocurity promised. Will 
pay Legal/ Madloal expenses. 
Call Las and Marianne collect 703- 
356-4576. 12/29 

My name Is David, I am 2 1/2, 
living In Christian family. Mommy is 
R.N. staying home with me. We 
want a brother or sister. Can pay 
axpanssa. Call Paul And Mary. 
703-257-8070. 12/8 

ADOPTION 
Wa know you are faced with a 
difficult eholoa. Let us help you 
find a loving, earing home for your 
baby. WE ARE EASY TO TALK 
TO. Please call FRIENDS IN 
ADOPTKW 1.S00-M2-3678. 1/5 

MEET 

NEW PEOPLE 

THE FUN WAY 

TODAYI 

1-900-255-2700 EXT. 7825 

Muat be 18 yrs. 

Touch-tone phono required 

Serv-u (619}-645-8434). 

1/12 
SINGLE 0IRL8 A QUY8 
looking for love & romance? Call 
your peraonal dateline to meat 
your matohl 1-900-255-2525. Ext 
8157. $2.99/ min 18 + Tch-Tn Fon 
Raq. SERV.U 619-e48-8434. 
12/29 

SPORTSI TRIVIA AND SCORES. 
COLLEGE AND PROFESSIONAL. 
FOOTBALL, BASEBALL, BASK- 
ETBALL, HOCKEY. UPDATED 
DAILY. 1-900-226-4967. (2.98 
PER MINUTE) MUST BE 18 
YEARS. TOUCH TONE 
REQUIRED. 

BEACH PARTY ENTERTAINMENT 

Hottest dateline 1-900-287-6445 
$2.99/ min. Must be 18+ 

Match Maker Network 
Share Thla Holiday Saaaon Call 
1-600-388-7879 ext 12. One 
simple phone call, and see for 
yourself Just how eaay It can be. 
HenoatI CALL TODAY $2.49/ 
min, 18 yrs + HTP Va. Bch. Va. 
604-430-DATE (3283) 2/9 

mn Ufa Christian Datbig 
AgMoylno. 

Looking for someone special? Call 
today for info about special 
introductory rate. No obligation. 
Call free 1-800-823-7789. 

Physic tells you about your 
financial futura, tove and success 
& your health 1-900-820-6500 ext 
24K. $3.99 per min, must be 18 
yrs. Prooall Co. 602-954-7420 



Looking for someone aboai^ the 
USS Liberty in the 60's. PIsmo 
-mnw to P.O. BOX 1327 
Chesapeake, Va 23320 Attn: USS 
Liberty. My father la kwking for 
shipmatea. tfn 



24 year old mother of 3 seekktg a 
frtond to go out and ha\w fun wHth 
NO HANKY PANKYI Interest are: 
singing, Karaeka, Country 8 
CiMalc twM, eomady dubs, danc- 
ing, ato... Looks 8 i^e unlmpor- 
tsntl Sertous inqu^ only. 
Let's be frisndsl Wrto: P.O. Box 
1327 (A-1) Chesapeake, Va. 
23327. 



PETS 



AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD 
PUPPIES AVAILABLE 12/23, 
$400 each. AFRICAN OSTRICH 
$500/oach. SOUTH AMERICAN 
OSTRICH $100/each. 
AUSTRALIAN OSTRICH $50/each 
Ken — 919-491-2376. 60 miles 
south of Norfolk. 1/12 

Border collie puppies- very toyai 
Intelligent pets/ exceptional 
herding dogs $75.00 each. OkJer 
Male / Female, Free to good 
home 804-562-2833. 

Pit bull pups- ADBA/UKC 
registered. l8t shots and wormed. 
Parents on premises. Stud service 
available. Call 340-8373. 

HAPPY JACK SKIN BALM: 
Checks scratching, relieves hot 
spots and Irritated skin without 
steroids. Promotes healing & hair 
growth on dogs & catsi Available 
0-T-C INDUSTRIAL HDWE 543- 
2237. 

FREE- 8wk okl female kitten, black 
& white. Very friendly to good 
home only. Call 399-7907. tfn 

FREE- to good homa 1 female cat 
lyear and kittens , also 2 afgan 
hound mix free to good home, all 
very loveable. call 474-1791 

Looking for a flea-tick ahampoo 
that kills fleaa, monthly flea 
programs cani . Ask INDUSTRIAL 
HARDWARE 544-2232 about 
HAPPY JACK PARACIDE 
shampoo. Contains no pyrathrinsi 



REAL ESTATE 



HISTORIC PORT NORFOLK- 

Newly remodeled 1 bedroom apt. 
Formal dining room. $499 per 
month, discounted rent Includes 
utilities, immediate occupancy 1- 
423-725-5988, 1/5 

Truataa muat aall- Remodeled 
Triplex. Great cash flow. Reduced 
to 84,900 or best offer 1-423-725- 
5988. 1/5 



ROOMS FOR RENT 



THOMAS NELSON HOTEL 

Phone, color TV, dally maid 
service. Dally $21 * tax, also 
weekly rates 622-4341, Qranby 
St., Downtown Norfolk. 12/29 



TICKETS 



QREAT PHANTOM TICKETSli 
Rear dress oiroia. IndlvMuai tickets 
$46.50 with packages available 
Deo. 15th, 16th. 22nd, 23rd, 29th 
and 30th. Also New years eve 
packages available. 393-2873 ext. 
7993. HolMay Inn Portsmouth. 



VACATION 



BAHAMA CRUISE 

5 days / 4 nights 

UNDERBOOKEDI MUST SELLI 

$279 / couplel LIMITED TICKETSI 

1-800-935-9999 EXT. 6423 

Monday through Saturday 

9am- 10pm 

1/5 



UNEXPLAINED 

POWERIII 

Psychic t9llsyou things 
youmaynotsvsnwsnt 

to know?? 
1-900-^S-0300 Ext. 2713 

$3.99 per mIn. 

Must be 18 yrs. 

Touch-tone 

SSfV-U (619) 645-8434 



TRAVEL 



SKI SNOW SHOE 
West Virginia. 1 & 2 bedroom 
unite, sleeps 4-8. Whistle punk, 
Snowcrest, Powderidge, Flr^ace, 
'cable, VCR, Jacuzzi, owner rates. 
Call Linda 603-277-7449, fax 803- 
299-1323. 1/5 



TRUCKS FOR SALE 



1950 Ford Pk^kup 

Bnskwoods handyman 

Spedall Has 2 motors 

$350 ( does not run) 

Call 479-9863 after 1 pm 

Monday-Friday 1 pm to 7 pm 

Saturday & Sunday. 

91 FORD EXPLORER XLT 
Loaded, am/fm cassette stereo, 
power windows & door kxsks, tilt 
wheel, cruiee control, sun/moon 
roof. Good condltton. $12,000, 
book value $15,300. Call 429- 
9316. tfnsb 



WANTED TO BUY 



OM electronic parts, tubes. Big okl 
speakara, tube HIFI amps. Old 
electronic books, cataloga. Call 
703-856-8277. 12/29 

Looking for parts for a 1967 Ford 
Falrlane 4 door Sedan. Please call 
399-7907 after 6:00 until 10:00 
pm tfn 

AAQUITARS WANTED** 

Cash paid for used aooustio or 
electric guitars and ampa. 895- 
4663. 1/8 



LOOKINB POR BIOLOQICAL 
MOmn-efohldtofflAprtlMth. 
1177, ado^ meliiar werkad it 
WhKs Tmmt en UMa Crk Rd. Any 
MOiplMasealiUT-TNQ. 



GetAUfe! 



LUXURY APARTMENTS 
&TOWNHOMES 

FITNttl CBITIII • TENNIS COURTS 

OLYMPIC SB MOL • nmWQ QREEN 

JMUZB*SiCUnTYrAI>F 

9{otCy^oint 

CALL 424-7867 

OnPravMineilld..ailissWMef 
Military HwyJOpinMon.-8lLI-S 

1992 Awud Of BxedltDM 



ON WATCH FOR 
AMERICA. 




On ships, planes and submarines, 
in locations around the world, the 
men and women of the United 
States Navy are on watch. They re 
putting their traliUog to work in 
Jobs that make a (Ufference, while 
developing skills they 11 need for 
a successful future, Just as Impor- 
tant, they re doing it for their 
counuy. They re Navy people, 
working hard for America. And 
that makes us proud. 

Navy, 
nill 8p#Mi Ahaad. 



AQ AQ 

ALPHA OliffiGA Services 

Electrical Air Conditioning 
Plumbing Heating 

' Painting Minor Carpentry 
Floor Drywall 

486-7771 

498-3529 

AQ Your Home's Handyman AH 




BLANKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Clatslfiedt are 

published in 78 state newspapers. 

4 miiilon plus readers. 

25 WORDS $225. 

(For more than 25 words tfiere is an additional 
charge of $8.00 per word.) 

Call 04T'4971 for Classified RepresenUitive 



SEIZED CARS FROM t175. 
PowehM, CadNlaot, CtMvyi, 
•MWrt, ComMw. MioJMpt, 4 
vn)*!. Your ana Ton (rat 1-800- 
80S-«77i Ext. A-S1» tor ourrant 
Fm. 



OOVERNMENT FORECLOSED 
HOMES tor ptnniM on t1. DMn- 
quMi Tax. fll*e'(, REO'i, FDIC, 
RTC. mS. Your MM. Toll trw 

i-aoe«s-»7n exi. h-siss for 

home nrPISTS NEEDED. Alio 
FCAWoidproooworusois. MCOOtV 
yNrkwcmapeliMW. ToKfrooi- 
I00«»«77t ElL T-613e tor do- 

tW.OO(Vy|AR mOOME potwiUal. 
RsMnoteeta. TelfiMl-«00- 
MMTT* Ixt R-81M tor dolallt. 



OOT ACAMPOROUNO MEMBER- 
SHIP OR TMBBHARE? WE'LL 
TAKirr, AMIRIOA'SMOSTSUC- 
CIUPUI. HIIORT niBALi 
CUMRMOHOUH. OALLRMORT 
IALniNKNMATIONTOU.nWI 

HOTUNi i-MiMn-sair, 

iUNQUIST WWLPP TANNINQ 
ilOS OanHMralBl-HoiM Units 
nwn UN Iw PaaWy DIimI Md 
•AVI Can TOOAV tor NEW mil 
Ootor Caiatoa 1-«0IHIM1»7. 

HAtraU) IVIS TRUCMNQ Nrtng 
Mvars. PiM Mvar TiaMng... K 
Mu ouallfv. Saxtonli wolnfima 

yww ifw^vnyi v^pi^pvnv ■^vfwwf'.wi 

EspMlanoa pay up to H« par rMto, 
■■ "■ 1 — 



Paynwitt? WhyWattt QETCA8H 
NOWl NtfkmwMo. QrMlPrieoo. 
Can 1-600-680-2274 Ext. 36. 

South CaraMw LAKEVIEW BAR- 
OAMI |1S,S00 Freo Boot Sllpl 
BoauWuHy woodod lol w/lroo pri- 
vita boM iUp In ipoctaeular wator- 
Iranlooniniunlty abutting goNoouno. 
Pavod road*, wttor, lotMr, morol 
ExooMnillnanolno. Watarfranlalta 
iviMbto. Call now, 800-704-3164. 
Tknbariika Eatalai. 

AHordaM* and BaautHul Smoky 
MountalnWaddlogChapalt. Thraa 
ohapaK providing budgat prioai. 
Log Ruailo; Elaborata Modam; in- 
tornial Walk-In. Comptotaaarvtoat 
provWad. Oollywood Country. 1- 
100462-6688. 

Ortvan • OTR ADS 61,000 Sign-on 
Bonusl UfflHadopanlngatori 
rtonoad Mbad drivari. 
oonvmttonali, banallH, 401k and 
mora. Call todayl 6004464466, 
ixt. 1016. OwnarOpa<«onW*l- 
I 



AAA Oppartumiy OTR OrtvM 'A 
Caiaar Oompany *A 1 1^ulpfflarR 
•A Ptota le Ml HMiw Muat ba at 

BUaa (MMivar Motor PialgM 1- 
600-7164064 6 am.4p.ffl, 



Bl YOUR OWN BOBB. 
11600 paiMMM SiOOO Iull4nw 
nwmMy, preoaatlng InauranM 
Bfsiins iwf nSOTiesn pivviaeis. 
■nwBSfm iw|URSO* ■Dnwraiwp 

jitaaaA mAiib 4Ua^MualkB 'PriTifJnn 

QnSSV pms vrnfUamt rnWiOInD 

SVtttto 140O-7IHMM. 

a.iA. MTVOURHIOH SCHOOL 
EOUIVALINCY DIPIOMA IN 4 
WnnwmtOURIABY TO POL- 
LOW HOME STUDY OOURBi, 
OALLi 



M/IHRBWiBrOP0OBB.TWAY. 
RMar LSI StMO 611400, 
D0«n'|1B7.47M). 
Am mA inbL ttsK IB umbsImI riMsr 
'sWismni unnenrrai nsasyis 
buMitamparNlm, OalinowKM- 
4SB-S4N. Pto. 10ymalS,7SKANM, 
1167.47AM 

ABANOOMDHOMWtil IBAOM 

S m iaOiw. L«Ml,saaMMjiMi 
ipfwi^i On MMi fOidi uMttiti 
piiMdi fcmHiwl ft WBOlRB. Only 
WW. Otfno^ M OW m Tl. 

• ITATIVtoiMMII A0rM«prtM 
il4i777t wflOdli IWdSt nCWS a 
QondaMa wpw nUMlM 4miHS ■ 
pQISfMO MMft uMWm Idi UnSi 



DRIVIRB: ISS.OOOf ytarly, up to 
I.SSAnl„baheniaavaryB-1ldays, 
Iraa madlsal, dinial. ratlramani, 
11000 tarp, SHO satoty bonus, 
Aisi0nM ifMioMi Hofnady Tniok 
Uea 140044S-7666. 

•INaLiBi MEr smgto paepto 
Ihieuofwul nual Amattoa, OenIN 
danilal,rtpuiaM,aalablWwd^. 
Praadaiws. Country ConnaoUons 
NatMtoltor, P.O. Box 406, Bupa- 
itor,Nabm*ka66B7S. 

STEEL BUILOINO hwantoiy otoN 
out. Samng all rtmalning 1666 In- 
vantoty at BUPIR BAVINOB TO 
YOUl Vaitou* sisaa and modab, 
Mng la«, Ordar todayl HiroM 1- 
60O441-7007, 

MAIL BOaS ETC. THE WORLD'S 
LANOiBT NETWORK OF FRAN- 
OHMEO POSTAL. BUSINESS AND 
COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE 
CENTERS IB EXPANDma, DIB- 
COVER HOW YOU CAN QROW 
WITHUSI 1-600^8M414. 

OVBRTNEROAOD««VBRSnaadad 
Im m a d la wi y. L aOr oia a . Vli^ 
araa. Oilva lop o( na Hna ilg*. 
ORT a x pai to na a . Otoan drtvino 
laaord, M laaai as yaan o( aga. 
ABOTianspaiHlton,UCrg**a,\Ar- 
lnla60»4644SSI. AILellorRay 
BOE, 



LINES 1-6004434306 or 1-800- 
84»-3364 Madlaon, 80. Mon-Fd 
S-SPMCaniral. CAUIIII 

A Baautlim Christian Marrliga 
QaHnbwg^OiltfnaiWaddkigCh^ 
al« (Sinoa 1880). Photography, 
Muslo, Flowars, Umos, Jaoeuzl 
Suitoa, Fliaplaoaf. Wadding For 
Any Budgat. Rav. Si Taylor l- 
600-346-2778. 

DEBT CONSOUDATIONI Cut 
ntonMy pmf«mH» to 50%. Ra- 
duoa or alMnMa InMratt 24 hr 
approval. Non-proHt, lioanaad 6 
bondad. 1-80O426O180EXT.8O4. 

DRIVERS - CON-WAY TRUCK- 
LOAO SERVICES - THE BEST 
WAY, Teppay.oonipanypaldban- 
*Ma. 2800 iMtoa/iMak avaraga., 
0TR,Mb8d^VanwdBlH*alWr^) 
oppenunHtoaavaiiabto. Can 1400- 
886-CWT8 (MS7). Equal 0ppo^ 
lunlty Emptoyar. 

COMPUTER • Wa'r* Mhng in Rioh- 
mond, AMama. and Non n a ast . AS/ 
400 Programmlngi MalnMm* Pro- 
gramming: Cnam-Sarvar Davatop- 
manliOrasto. PeslMnahavtootn- 
paUlva aalaito* and lull banallH, 
Oomasl: DPMI, 140046l-16S1i 
Pax: 140046S4067,, 

WOLPP TANNINO BIDS • Buy al 



tfntoMM 

Aihwortn. 



AaBI8TEDUVINa-a4/Hr.Ue8naad 
BuMivlaton tor tha aMady, tram 
MOO monthly, aHlnahialva, Itovan 
VAUsattona, smoalSSS. AMIRI- 
CAN RRMIMINTHOMH, 1400- 



■an.auiyBM BrtiiisimwM Basalt 

itoJMmlMmiMlhni 16«6, OaN 
64046Mi16. 



1BT B H WMOW TttAttM FAIT, 
OHOiailsaTmyaiiSMIMBBS 



DRMHI-HAPPYHOUDAYSI Or 
TM BIIT OVIRAU PACKAQE 
AM3UND. M0O*/Wm( AVER- 
AM HMH MILU. EXCILLINT 
MNIPITS, MNIROUB BONUS 
PROORAMB. RlflULAR 

HOMtniM. aUUNQTON MO- 
TOR OARRimft 140IKIOIN4MC, 
101. 

ORtvlRB-aetoiTaama,|IOOaoo 
Ston On, Top Tawns lam 
1106,000*. MalorBanams/MoMI t 
DaMhsM ftyi DnnHQ vonooi 
QfMiWpooiMf Oovanani Tfans* 
partiefr44l-4J64. MudanHCall 



Trnyail 
ar1-«00«MBBS. OMBITATI 

Wl BUY HWRTQAaiB, Truat 
DM 
YauMtV^urPfopn^ RaeaMng 



ATTNi IXPIRIINOEO TRUCK 
MIVEM DNIVI TO OWNin 60 
OowVTStAUMILU. OwnaraNp 
peaalMaIn ISmonth*. A«g. 10,000* 
mVaaAnenti, Company Ori\«an: 
NEWER EQUIPMENT. Cofflpa«- 
iNa^ilBanaMB. Call: NEWAPPU 



Ml bo dy tonrtngt ada l i am 146,00 
fnonvi HomavwOomfAwoiii Call 
today 14004SB-601BI 

ORIVIRB-Sttilwftoppaytorsoto 
6 taama; add. pay tor oi^ailanoa 1 
ralaaa m i it yr. , aaoalant banam*, 
bonuaaa, proAt atiarlng, diraet da- 
paili. a salgnada qu l p . you lalM homa 
and II yeui'a a grad or 18 Wlyr, 
OTWCDL'A'.yDu'vagolitl 1400- 
6M4660 Ixt, 1-10. 

Any Cradit Rating ' Caah For 
Honiaewnat* * No Equity Programs 
* Lowaat RMa* ' No Up Front Faaa 
■LooalCo. 'UnltadSouthamMon- 
gaga * Call Nalsen ■ 1 ■800-264- 
8606. 

Ctwaapaaka Bay HOUOAY LAND 
UQUJOATlONlTakaadvant^el 
oH a a a aon piloaa and savt thou- 
sand* en boatabto VIrglnl* wata^ 
Iron propMly. 1* AC iwas 648,800 
NOW 116,6601 WHaraooaaalott 
«MraS17,660,NOWI11,N0. Saat 
Inanelng In yaar*. Vary low taxaa, 
Call nowl t,'600-776-4866, *xt. 
667S. 

STEEL BUILDINO BAUII SAVE 
60%ll BTRAISHTWALL OR 
QUONBET... Naadaahepf 10 « 
80 ... 64766.00: Hay Btor*g*f 40 
xlO ,.,06787,00 OthaniMltobto. 
SERIOUS CALLS ONLYII PIO- 
NEER 
1400^74'1688. 

TMMSNDOUB OPPORTUNITYI 
laqfMslaKbuaIn***; flaomltlng 
or nna Jawilry Salaa, Nolnvtn- 
loiyNqukad. Pro* Training, Naw 
OabMiaa. Sato* Doubling Ysarty. 
OuaatlnHrptKaa, 140l>4l6-7607. 

POOL TABLES • Ntw 1888 Mod- 
al*, All typ** and daH. SMto 
F a ctor y d l na t . S6N, Dallvaryand 
laNvayalMMa, Qraat llnanelngi 
Bpu also avMaM*. 1-6004S6- 
6471. 

C hrt i l an Bhaltor **ali* dliaotor wdih 



iPuHWy, 
ipanishi 



ator dagraa, oemmanaurato axpa- 
rianoa. Sand rasuma: Ditaotor, 
POBI47, Hanlaanbuig. VA12I01 , 




ll.$. Sayings Bonds for education 

GROW ALMOST AS FAST AS KIDS DO. 




Fwcurwrt fite infomatoi, call 



vmm^ 



Ikte 



E KMCC fli ml aCW^^^ 



Mita^^^riAri 



■■HHHIHHHH 



12 VifRinia Beach Sim. Friday. Decembea' 22. 1995 




%Awmy^ 




^p ^p ^p ^p ^s ^* 
* * 

^ Ttmii and Countr^^ 






Ptcmieis 




_®H®lil® 

® Ha;;,y ■ 
IS Holidays & W 
fl Festive 

New Year 



® 



from the staff 



® 



316 Budefield Blvd. S. 

Chesapeake, VA 23320 m 

482-2129 * 

482-1500 J|^ 



at your 
favorite ® 

©hometown 
newspaper 



® 



»;»»»»» ®|||®H® 



SOUTH NORFOLK TRUCKING INC. 



SHIP LOADING AND UNLOADING 

CONSTRUCTION, DEMOLITION 

GENERAL HAUUNG 

1316 SMITH DOUGLAS RO. 

543-4100 




Happy Holidaye 



South Norfolk Texaco 

We apprecbte ymr continued businea 

Old wish you a very 
Merry Christmas & a Happy New Yav 

900 E. Uberty Street 

Chesapeake, VA. 23324 

543-3577 



® 







Shirley B's Shoppe 



30^ Military Hwy. So. Chesapeake, VA 23323 
T-F10-6 
Satf. 1Qr4 

For>(Rore inio. caH 
SNrley B. Perry 

487-7770 



.^2!sSs 



Our best wishes and thanl» 

to ill (rf you v^Nie been so 

kffidtfid support 

IhrcM^wutttie^ar 





• Wilton's odM {MM 
&Mi^ies 

• llMekan etwfiiriale 
A lamiy inoids 
« Calw boxM & boards 



We're 



Happy Holidays! 
Thank you for a successful 1995 
looking forward to serving you in 1996 




QrtenSricr 
!F[orist, Inc. 

Daily Delivery to Ch^ap^ke, 

Norfolk, Portsmouth and 

Virginia Beach 

420-8000 
H Charge by Phone 

1813 Greenbrier Parlcway 
(next to Norfolk) 



wssm 

L :l 









CAMERON 

CHEMICALS, INC. 






With»s~We ^ptftebae ytmr 
coittintudhuiHessiuidlaokJorwarii^ 
itrvitigytm Anaghoat JfH. 



CarneronChernlcai, Inc. Is a mytl-M^lce chemical processing company 

that has de\«loped. Irviovottve techniques to get the most out of raw 

fTKitertafe and manufacturing by-products, Regardl^s of the nature of your 

busings, we offer economlcctf , env^onmentofly conscious sduHons to your 

neecfe. 

When It relotM to the reckynatlon recovery of fertilizer plant nutrients token 

from Industry co-products, cdl 

Camwon Chtnteol. Bscycler Agfeultowl NuMwits 843-ia7S 



H.E. WILLIAMS CANDY CO. 

May the season be as good to you as you've been to us 

1230 PE^RY STREET 
CHESAPEAKE, VIRGINIA 23324 



RESIDENCE 

547-7350 



-»i thiimiffir 



BUSINESS 

545-9311 




\nu shnuln \ isil 



ani rtasiui^ \vh\ 
i'ljass IJirhlin 



Wishing you a splendid holiday season! 

(Perfect jf^it iterations 

Let us make that dress or suit a perfect fit! 
Mwi's Suits • Women's Api»rel • Foimal Wear • Military Uniforms 

Monogramming Available 

Mon. - firi. 9-6 • Sat. 9-3:30 • Evenings by Appointment 
357 Johnstown Rd. 482-5969 

AverymerryChristtmmtoi^lAh&ai^t 'timnks' for your 
friendship & trust throughout the yair 

BEVERLY E. MORGAN 

BOOKEEPING 

TAXES -ELECTRONIC ARAL RUNG BANK STATEMOnS 

(NOTARY STATE AT LAR(») J(XN»ttLEKmeS 

GENERAL LEDGER QUARTB!LY TAXiS 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE FINANCIAL STATBIBfTS 

ACCOUNTS RE(»VAH^ PAYRCNJ. 

CHESAPEAKE, VIRGINIA 23323 
PHONE 485-1 041 FAX 485-K35 



riiis i^ fiiilx on*' of them. 

Warmeai vjn^mjb lui a Merry Christmas 
& a Happy New Year! 

iHifleqass Liijhtinq 




Merry Christmas 
Portsmouth! 

We thank yctu for entrusumg us twrfi your 
hack care m lime good 15 years. 

SffiYwTffls Holiday Seas^jI / t 
TIDEWATER CHIROPRACTIC, RC. 

4305 Portanouth Boulevaid • ft»rtsni»uth, VA 23701 * B04/465-1666 



Old eWorld Tradition mitli 
je^tatc-of'the'^rt gound 



Sligh, a name defining 
excellence in clock making fori1$ 
years presents the WeUesky 
"Chimes of History' movement. 
Classic styling, CD ijuality sound 
with a choice ofb4 
different melodies to 
ring in each hour. 
Limited Quality. 



....Qhimes of I:\ifit0r3 

Clocks Pttltmtf^h 

2100 Colorual Ave. 804 •623-2035 

(Comer of 21st and Cotonial Ave) 

In Noffolk's Historic Ghent 





002005 

VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY 

12TH. S- CAPITAL ST 



Richmond 



VA 23219 




The Virginia Beacli Sm 



lA BEACH NEWS and VIE^ 



67th Year 



No 53 



35 Cents 



Council 
opposes 
bi-partisan 
eiections 

By LEE CAHILL 
City Council Raportof 

A bill submitted by Virginia 
Beach Del. Bob Purkey for 
consickration by the 19% General 
Assembly would make council 
elections in Virginia Beach 
partisan. 

City council sees the bill as a 
threat to the historically non- 
partisan nature of council elections 
and a hindrance in getting things 
done for the city. At a recent 
council meeting, council appoved a 
proposal by councilwoman Barbara 
Hraley to have a refaewlum on the 
quKlion cm the May ballot 

In the meantime, however, 
council adopted a resolution 
(qjposing the bill. House Bill No. 
1, sulmiitted by Puikey. 

The resolution states that the 
Code of Virginia curraitly {sovides 
that no names of poUtic^ parties 
shall ai^jear on the ballot, except as 
provided ioc presidential elections. 

It currently provides that no 
names of political parties shall 
appear on the ballot except as 
provided fcH^ jaesidential elections. 

The Purkey bill deletes that 
language and adds a paragraph 
providing that each cancUdate who 
has been nominated by a political 
pany shall be identified by the 
name of his political party. 

Tte molatkm st^i^ that the bill 
will "severely undermine the 
council's efforts to keep partisan 
politics out of the local 
governmental process and be 
contrary to the best interests of die 
City of Virginia Beach and its 
citizens." 

The advantage in having the 
referaidum in d» May bailed is that 
the pe(q)le most inter^tnl in local 
electicMis vote in the May electi(»is. 

But since the bill, if pa^ed by 
the Goieral Assembly would be 
effective oa. July I, couiK:il is using 
die r^olution to let die General 
Assonbly know how council feels 
about the bill. 

Councilman Jdm A. Baum said 
that it would be b^ter if the coimcil 
and General As^mbly delegates 
worked togedier. 

Baum who has served on council 
longer than any sitting council 
member, added diat as kxig as he's 
been on council he had never seen 
any issue come up bti<xt council 
where a party affiliation was 
pertinent 

Given the past history of the 
General Assembly, councilwoman 
Louisa Strayhom said Uiat diis may 
be an issue which requires that 
council to go to the General 
Assembly. 

Ctwncihnan Harold Heischober 
said Aat he did not diink diat any 
tegisl^im affecting die ciQr should 
te introduced widiout informing 
city coiBicil fir^ 

Mayor Meywa (Monctorf, who 
jnoposnl'the lewlutim, said that 
(te-politicizing council elections is 
good for onptoyees, too. 

Vice Maya William D. Sessoms 
Jr. ^ded thk the council si^pdntees 
city manager, city attorney, city 
ctedc ffld real est^ a^ssc^ shodd 
not be employed because of dieir 
pdilia. Tl^ir appointment is based 
(Ml B^tit He said diat l» did nM 
ewo ttJBk of party affiliation in 
nud^^ ttese a{^intments. 

I^ftisan elections, Obemdorf 
said, could even lead to pimtty 
^K^km Hid the expense invdi«d 
u tiK) etectuns would rule out die 

Ctwndlman W.W. Harrison Jr. 
said that his only concern is 
adopti^ Ac wudution was whether 
it WNld be wiss to discuss it with 
d^ptfnMflrtt. 

S^ams snd tet he h^ ^x^n 
pwn Md tei be tod mack it cl(^ 
dw he wMtt't tmnetfcd in nM^ing 
wWiraneU. 

CmncU ^aeiiUy meeu wiUi 
kx^ f^nasnrivM in die Genenl 
AH^bly u> diKais die city's 
l^ilittvepn^w^ta. 



Giving it his 'ail' and even more 

Linwood Branch ill is named 
Outstanding Young citizen '95 



By VICTORIA HECHT 
Sun Editor 

Linwood O. Branch III 
stands in the middle of the. 
multi-million dollar Virginia 
Marine Science Museum ex- 
pansion project and looks a bit 
like a prcHid papa. 

Ifis eyes gleam at the men- 
tion of the 3-D Imax dieater 
that will bring movies to life. 
He beams when talking about 
the aviary diat will let visitors 
see birds up close and per- 
sonal. He chuckles at the 
smiling faces that the otter 
exhibit and show will bring. 

He is genuinely excited 
about die project, a new gem 
in Virginia Beach's shining 
Neptune crown. 

Such an atdtude befits the 
city's Outstanding Young Citi- 
zen for 1995. 

With a saavy business- 
man's demeanor underneath a 
boyish grin, Branch is casually 
clad in a yellow pullover 
sweater as he sits behind the 
desk at his office in die Soudi 
Shore Resort Inn. Strong winds 
whip across Atlantic Avenue 
as winter's bitter cold sweeps 
the rescm strip. 

But inside the hotel that 
Branch owns and operates, all 
is well. Certificates and 
plaques of achievement deck 
die walls, and a pastel portrait 
of Clint Eastwood hangs di- 
recUy above his head. On his 
desk are notepads — lots and 
lots of them — as Branch says 
he is prone to making lisits for 
this, diat fflid everything else. 

Lists for what he'd like to 
see happen to Virginia Beach 
in die next few years. 

Lists on ways to lure more 
tourists. 



"To do" litu of people he 
owes corespcNidence. 

Maybe even a grocery list or 
two. 

Branch is literally "explod- 
ing," as he puts it, widi diings 
he wants to get dcme. Talking 
to this motivated young man, 
one quickly realizes he 
probably will accomplish 
diem. 

Yet Branch, a Virginia 
Beach City Council member 
since 1992 and past president 
of the Resent Retailers Asso- 
ciation, is mystified as to why 
die city's Jaycees would name 
him their Outstanding Young 
Citizen of die year. 

"Honestly, I don't know 
why," he shrugs, "I'll be die 
fu^t to say diere are a lot more 
deserving people. But being 
nominated by my colleagues 
is a great honor." 

Past president of the Vir- 
ginia Beach Hotel/Motel As- 
sociation (1990), Branch' was 
instrumental in the implemen- 
tation of die Beach Events 
program. He was also respon- 
sible for the acceleration of 
Atlantic Avenue revitalization 
efforts. 

During his time on city 
council, he has been responsi- 
ble for a number of accom- 
p1Hfimehls,"lllcEding the cre- 
ation of a Tourism Growth In- 
vestment Fund, the West 
Neck Creek Golf Course, 17di 
Street Park, expansion of die 
Virginia Marine Science Mu- 
seum, the Virginia Beach am- 
phitheater and the American 
Music Festival. 

One might say Virginia 
Beiu;h's tourism attractions are 
experiencing a renaissance. If 
diat is so, dian Branch may bcr 
anotho- 1^ Vinci. 




Pholo by Victoria H«cW 

CIVIC lEAOBL tmHtag brM«y wHIi tbt tkylitbt af the VIrgbila 
Ktorite tclMKc MHHwa •» > < — fc « fciwliy iito fM^ Unm«l 
0. WtwmA m wn racMrtljr nimd Vlr||aia Beidi'i OattttnMiig 
YtMf CWiM af 199S ^ the Virflali Beach Jtyccct. Branch 
was iartnuneatal la imlttag the maseam prefect a reality. He 
aba wrvee aa Vlr|^ Bean Oly Caaacil. 



Virginia Beach's Out- 
standing Young Citizen of die 
Year sees such coups as a re- 
sult of teamwork, and he ac- 
cepts the Jaycees honor on 
diat note. 

"There is no T in team," he, 
emphasizes. "I'm honored to 



receive the award, but I'm go- 
ing to receive it ioi some of 
the things, that we're trying to 
do — perhaps an afflrmation 
diat we're going in the right di- 
rection. That's how I'm accept- 

I 

DBRANCH,PAGE6 



Waters run deep for bay's native son 



By JANE ROWE 
Sun Correspondent 

Jim Clark is always at home 
when he's talking about Back Bay. 
He greets professionals with the 
same easy firiendliness as he greets 
good, old boys n^n die subject is 
hunting or fishing. 

"Hey, you still doing some 
fishin*?" he calls whui he spcAs <»ie 
buddy. "I still owe you a Ashing 
trip. Don't fcHget to call me, now." 



Clark, who works as a hunting 
and fishing guide, has spent a large 
[»rt of his 46 years on die water. 
The tall, sandy-haired Princess 
Anne County native biows every 
pond, island and creek on the Back 
Bay watershed. 

He knows where to catch blue 
cabs and toss and how many ducks 
will likely spend the winter here 
diis year. He also knows diat die 
fishing isi't what it used to be, but 




fu mm wtAW/fiM^ 



aaa upMt Jtai Claim acyy 



diat some species may be making a 
comeback. 

"The good news," Clark said, "is 
that die bay's healdiier dian it used 
to be. But die bad news is diat it's 
still a very SKk body of water." 

The grasses diat help to cleanse 
die water are returning now, and die 
water on Back Bay's east side is die 
clearest it's been in years, dianks 
partly to clean-up efforts by 
environmental groups and to 
favorable weadier conditions this 
year, according to Clark. 

But the west side still suffers 
from too much run-off and turbidity 
and diere still aren't any toss in die 
open toy. 

"I go wading with my grandson 
into waist-deq) water," Clark said. 
"It's crystal clear and matted widi 
grass on die east side of the toy." 

He added, however, that the area 
is still nothing like it was during 
"Uie glory days of die 1970s" when, 
as a boy, be first explored the toy 
in a small boat powered by a five 
Iwreepower engine. 

Clark grew up about two miles 
west of Sandl»idge "and I hung 
around the water and took \a duck 
hunting," he said. In tho% days. 
Back Bay was teeming with fish, 
and more citation-siz^, or eight- 
pound, large-mouth bass were 
caught here than anywhere in 
Viigmia. 

"Y(w could catch so many m 
easily," te said. 

Clark's fad^ has been managuig 
Aingo Fvms Hunt Club, where he 
ukI his tetxhere work, siiKe 1972. 
AldXMigh Ont's a (^^nsm m die 
c^i ft« d^wtmoit, be finds time 
on his days off to gui(te fishing 
trips diffing the sunun»' and take 
(wt hi^^ |»^s fd two or dwee 
dming die wmler. 

Tve been doing it mc^t of my 
life,' OaA sud. "It's a family 
tiling. I save my loive so I cm 



guide hunting trips during the 
winter, and also work for some 
hunting lodges." 

Although he knows most local 
outdoor enthusiasts through his 
years on the water and in the 
community, most of his clients 
come here from outside die area. 

"You wouldn't believe the people 
who come here to hung," he said. "I 
get doctors, lawyers, judges and 
business executives.Most of the 
peqile wIk> can afford to hire guit^ 
are uiqier-middle class people. But 
you also get some fathers taking 
dieir boys hunting and just regular 
mi(kUe<lass people." 

Most of the people Clark 
guides are experienced hunters, and 
he said that it's surprising how 
many people from as far away as 
Wa^ington, D.C. come here u> 
hunt. 

"When I was a boy the whole 
west side of B^k Bay was nodiing 
but hunt clubs," he said. "From die 
ISOOs until die 1970s Back Bay 
was a duck-hunting mecca." 

MtMher Nature works in cycles, 
Clark said, and he said the decline 
in the Bay's grasses and its fish 
population is partly due the natural 
course of events. But he blames 
increased run-off from non-point 
source pollution for the bay's 
deterioration in recent dec^tes, mi 
ht credits the resurgence of aquatic 
gras%s and irKreased salinity due to 
dry weather for its possible 
condndc in the la^ two years. 

"I always predicted that those 
gr^»» would never ccxne tock," 
Clark sud. "It does run in cycles, 
but in die 1940s, 'SOs and '60s 
when diey came tock we wasn't 
impacting the land like we are 
now." 

He pointed to recent large 
residential developments in 

OSaaWATHm, Pages 



Too many 
candidates 
for just one 
election? 

By LEE CAHILL 
City Council Reporter 

What's this about making 
electk)!^ easier for die voicts? 

Councilman Linwood Branch 
doesn't think it's going to be easy 
for die voters to sort Uirough 
candidates for nine Virginia Beach 
School. Board seats and nine city 
council seats diat wiU be befcve die 
voters in die May 1998 election. 

Say just two run for each seat; 
that's 38 candidates. 

One of die braefits cited for ward 
elections — whether elections 
will be a combination of ward and 
at-large or all at-large elections has 
yet to be decided — was diat 
voting would be made easier for the 
votos. Branch reminded council at a 
recent meeting. 

To cut down die confiisi(»i of too 
many candidates. Branch has 
proposed a charter amendment ttot 
would provide diat beginning in 
1998 school board members will be 
elected at the general election in 
November. 

Council voted unanimously to 
hold a public hearing on Jan. 2 at 2 
p.m. in the council 
chambers to find out what the 
citizens think about die proposal. 

Council can dien send its 
proposal to die Goieral Assembly 
for approval. 

Add artother 
redistricting 
plan to the pot 

By LEE CAHILL 
City Council Reporter 

City council is sending a fifth 
redistricting plan for evaluation by 
Election Data Services, the 
consulting fum hired by the city to 
determine whether the plans meet 
the Voters Rights Act/Justice 
Dqjartrorat requirements. 

Councilman W.W. Harrison, 
with the help of councilmembers 
Barbara Henley and John A. Baum, 
prepared die plan and said diat it 
was a modification of the plan 
submitted by City Treasitfer John 
Atkinson. 

All of the plans divide die city 
into districts of aip-oximately equ^ 
population as required by law. 

The Harrison^nley/Baum plan 
differs from die Addnson plan in 
diat it places all of die agricultural 
southern end of die city in one 
district To get die (tesired numbers 
die southern district, in addition to 
die present, Pungo and Blackwater 
boroughs will include parts of 
PriiKess Anne Borough. 

The Atkinson plan had the 
districts divided so that each of the 
new districts woukl be the home of 
one of the sitting council members, 
except that ccwncihnan Rotort K. 
Dean's residence was off by a few 
blocks. 

The Harrison plan corrects the 
Dean situaticm but has bodi Henley 
and Baum in the same future 
district. Henley and Baum figured 
diat keeping die agricultural dktrict 
together was better for the 
agricultural interests. 

A key ingredient of the Adcinsm 
plan retained in the Harison plan is 
the representation of varicHis parts 
of die Central Business District by 
four district representatives. 
Harrison said diis was a ^u^le 
asset ci die plan. 

However, Harrisoi said oiw of 
the faults of dw AtkinscMi plan is 
that it divides die hotels into two 
distrkts. Aboit four w five of the 
hcMels are lumped to^to^ wM i 
prectominandy tesi(toitiid distrh^ 
The Harrism plai {Mts the hMels 
logedm' sold d^ new dittict w(»3d 
tove about die sasat onflginatiai 
as dK jv^m l^ach BoKM^ 

Iforiey ^ tttt she ^ta't 1MM 

an^»K 10 be waiSm die iOimxi ^ 

she lik^ dK pR^mA btt tat k is 

die le^ fd nro evte. She aud 

DSaarwnHPi^f 



mmm 



■■■ 



VHiPli^Bii 



M^ 



a ViaUm Beich Sun, ftklav. Dectanto 29. 1995 



Commentary 



Make 'em, break 'em 

A new year! Ah, what better time to take a 
fresh look at life, turn over a new leaf and 
make a change for the better? In short, it's 
that time of year again when we faU all over 
ourselves to make New Year's resolutions and 
hope that 1996 will actually be the year we 
don't break them in record time. 

Let's take a look at some typical resolutions: 

■ Qettii^ a handle on the old spare tire. 
Many folks wouldn't suffer by losing 10 or 20 
pounds. And certainly, with all the Christmas 
egg nog and turkey celebrations over, they are 
confident of victory in the battle of the bulge. 

Reality check, one month later: Instead of 
losing tiiose 10 pounds, you have, in fact, 
gained five more. What did it? Surely not all 
tiiose beers you swilled during the Superbowl 
or that Christmas candy left over from the 
holidays ^u Just couldn't let it go to waste — 
or make that waist), and certainly not that 
one-pound Whitman's Sampler specially 
packed for Valentine's Day (which the stores 
started touting Dec. 26). And let's not even 
mention all the chips and dip you downed at 
the New Year's Eve party! 

"Oh well," you tell yourself with resignation, 
"starting Monday I'm on a strict diet for sure." 

■ Quitting smoking. Unless you live in a 
ca>^, you know that smoking isn't exactly the 
best thing for your health. Cigarette 
manufacturers aren't required to put those 
Surgeon General's Warnings on the packages 
for nothing. So you promise yourself that at 
the stroke of midnight, no more puffing for 
you. You break what cigarettes you have left. 
You stock up on celery and carrot sticks to 
munch. You even Invest in a rubber band to 
wear around your wrist to snap each time you 
get the urge to light up. 

Reality eheck, one week later: "Why, " you 
ask yourself, "did I make that stupid 
resolution in the first place?" You got sick of 
the carrot and celery sticks the first day. By 2 
p.m. on Nfcw Year's Day. you were frantically 
searching the garbage can for one of those 
broken cigarettes you tossed out the night 
before. And the rubber band? You shot the 
thing across the room the next day after 
taking yotir vow to break the habit. 

"Who needs a red, raw wrist?" you said 
luting up. "Some moron must have Invented 
that Ideal" 

■ Bringing spending in check. Face it: 
unless 3rour name is Scrooge, you tend to 
piddle away money and end up scratching 
your head asking, "Gee, where'd it all go? 
Hmm...a soda here, a lunch out there, and a 
few new CDs can't add up to all that much, 
can it?" 

Think again. 

So having remembered that last year you 
vowed to save a dollar a day in a jar and put it 
toward a new stereo (but pitifully you only 
ended up with $12), you put yourself on a 
strict budget. Brown bag lunches. No extra 
frills like Car Digest and Computer World 
picked up at the comer convenience store on 
a whim. No chocolate milkshakes from the 
drive-thru, even though they're only 99 cents. 
Save...8ave...save. 

ReaUty cheek, one day later: Dam! You 
bought that little notepad to put in your 
pocket to record aU your expenditures, but 
you can't seem to find it. And lunch? WeU, you 
really intended to take It to work with you, 
but there wasn't time to make a sandwich 
before heading out the door. You vow to pack 
your lunch the night before... but, of course, 
you forget. 

We would all be better off resolving not to 
make resolutions at all; then perhaps it will 
be a happier New Year for all. Whatever your 
decision, good luckl — V.E.H. 



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THE H^SlOOns NEW B^KBONE 



The great fruitcake contest lives! 



Whatpteasuie we lad in receiving 
so many wonderful nmaoies of 
Clmstnias past in our Orett Rniit 
Qdce Contest AQ desraved to win 
one of our ctkes, Imt qsoce (and 
cakes), alas, limiced us to these. 

ACaktAgalnatAliOddt 

My iHisband and I had jasL beoi 
discharged 
afin Wwld 
WvIIwhai 
he^ajcA 
in Tugier, 
North Af- 
rica. 

We had a 
cold-water 
flat -^ no 
stove, no 
fridge, no 

Commonmmt no»'>tag.But 

Commnttfy 




I wanted to 
fades a cake 



By Ray Chr- 
land, eolwnniit 



-— a jwfct 
Chf litmai 
cake. Pint 
nq>.aoqtifae 
acodcbook. 
FoundaFainyPanner,ciical923,at 
the flea market, cost 10 cents. 

Next step, Kquire the ingredients 
— not easy when }^)udon'tq)eaktlw 
language. So, armed wbh *^ Boy 
Lenons in Spanidi" I lallM fiorth. 
Opting fresh eggs was dw ftA prob- 
lem-- about half w«en'L But wtaha 
pan borrowed StomafriwdlyAmeri- 
c«i I got b made. Now, how to bd» 
a cake whoi ymi have IK) oven? 

Solution: a "cany" hoy to okt 
ymff cdce, balanced on Mi head in a 
cof^ tray, to die public bidce oven. 
I still fme a {riioio of AU ukI his 
aniUng face, beartaig my pncknts 
cakehoow. 
Theresa Pluimm, Ctuharf^ 



How Angel Bioko Hor Wing 

As in most families, the (rid Ovist- 
mas OTnaments tell many a story. We 
have a well-woni angel with a torn 
dress and a bndrai wing that has 
perched atop oiff tree for numy years. 
Each time she is urq»dced we are 
ronindedofhowshegotduttwiiy. ^ 

One Christmas in the late '40s, my 
father brought tomeapetraoxxm. It 
was quite tame, a frioi^y IMe ouss, 
and we all oijoyed playing with it. 
Bi}t we ain had a dog named Whis- 
kers, r Q b« you era guess the r^ of 
thenny. 

Whidcersw^itfiydieiaccoonand 
the racco(»i went q) the CloiitnMs 
tree. Omamrats flew in evny (Unc- 
tion, the tree nme iotm and dw 
angel did as aU angels do, i^ flew. 
Hut's how our ra^ came to have a 
hsKktm wii%. But Ooktmas at oar 
hoitte wouUn't be die same wUiout 
her. 

Jack Rankin, Round Hill 

AJaptnMtClirlttmM 

I remember Christmas 194S and 
the ^'s party we had at the Yo- 
k(»uka EnUsied Kfen'i Chib — kMs 
of beer, Uu^^ter and fbod. It was 
great, we'd «^ a mff and nnrvlved. 
It was good to be aUve, to be young 
andtohaveafkimie. 

Then I dwught of peofrie who had 
litde to Gtldbsm Att OaUmu — 
the Jq)an<M. I thouj^ of the pUgltt 
of hdneless pecv)le Hving in ndible 
— of little children I'd seen Uving In 
a culvert, cold rad hunpy. 

An i(tea o(%urred to me: We're 
going to qxraad a U^ of dutt dwer 
aiound. I had no intd)lB lecndting a 
coupte of helpers. ^k1 ti»n we did it 
— stoleaUnittdStioesNavytuikey. 
I mean we stole the whde difaig ■— 
huge. Juicy, sdll hot. loa^Ml bird. 




WekoRwbadctoreal^everjtody 
as we bU teewdl vo te h(Aday 
•eaaon and prepare to enter the new 
year. Oto' Fatter lime wUl non 
hob^ out at Baby New YearialMri 
in 1996. 

Qn it be 
that we've 
akeuiyuaed 
up another 
year? TTiat 
spring and 
summer's 
gre^ieiyhas 
pasted at 
quicUyata 
day? That 
autumn's 
colorful 
leaves are 
now com- 
p o s t 

dwevdiflor 
next year's 
planting!? 
That Hal- 
k)we«i,'nMnkml^fmlC&taeMi 
'93 w«!t pM tear tfim tte Utak (^ 
ui^e? 

Ym, 19% is bit a teMtt arnqf — 
nd I'm Mtoiramier v^iAvpeaed 
to tl» time. Time? It marcAMon. 

nw^ofa^vahn^nulcMme 
wax poedc, wh^har ft to toddag idl 
dittuwacconiAAedln \2ma^ 
or, flM»e iaq^ortt^y, b^ ^ n i i i^ 
1^ <to't M doM ia tei tee. I 
kxjk it ttfe^i apt anl 60WM, tte 
p)od and Ae bad, te ha^ and te 



OtfTtm 
Cuff 



tm^om at the OJ. Simpioa trial 
ripped at the fatoic of our law 
aiforceinentagaictos.IaeetnpB^ 
uigiy dMU Aeb money, milUcmi rad 
milUcmt of dcAan. wen ^wtt M tlw 
«ae. Now I tee J., iw^ idieady 
dawnaidobk^qri^idxMAe^ 
thr(Mi^hiseyei,nnklngavUeo to 
UnehitpodcM. 

CkMH 10 home, I win rraionber it 
as a yetf wbra Ptattlcut aeemhigfy 
bombed as foOa biriind tt iti d^- 
U^ adiids^» feet, dw Mttty flitag 
oi Qea^wake's c^ mtta§a, dw 
rM^j^on of acoimdhnn ante 
acH^ In ditt wne diy , tqnM^ 
MKng PofMM^Hh't council over 
wh«her a an»M Awld decoMe 
the oury 10 tte Qiikbm't MiiRim, 
continued encroachment of 
irtuiixiaion Into pMaial Pungo, 
wMfadbttkm (tf dw »w Vftr^la 
J^mk mB^ituMit ttid nuniMnt 
criRwevoywhem. 

HMwai AelMriB '9S.Lettwe 
forgettfM **food.''Ieom;«edaUttof 
dw htf^ tav^onfa^ at well. I dio 
remembered fttt, at Mrilrie at all (^ 
the Aove M^ wm^ ttere an 
mton n BO wSMo mn inm. 

WU» dw kwt ttf ttvai to OUa- 
torn ^ to a tn^cfy, I dAdc ditt 
the fflillions of Americans who 
Inched the (unwtf on l^Mrioa 
totto^AttlttBtopreckm— tewe 
^n^ tteaMe «di day for «^ b 
it, becHta yw M^r Imow utat't 
riilKiiend te eonar. 

As tetteOJ. tiU.cr IheflfWi^ 
the ceHKy" m it «n» toMed, w« 
to(M»d ItaA Mi M^» wU »v« be 



Just a poblem of the pow, but 
ewyone. 

Oi dwkxal scene, try loranmiba 
U» accomplishments in '93, nttho' 
than dw Mqrfd actkmt of tfwie bent 
(» detiraaion — like dw vndato of 
dwVfai^BeadiamiMdiMttf.Yes, 
(tani^ «w done. But dut did not 
brnkdw^iiritof dwisojecL In dnw, 
HampiMi Roads wUl Iw^ a new 
"gm" in ito crown. 

The CMkfrm't Muaram d Vir- 
ginto, idmiomenally success in iu 
flntywofopmttloa.tonodietfibig 
that will make me smite wlwn I 
ramember 1993. Thousands of 
children have already taken the 
iramfaottt um d«NVh dito itate-ctf- 
the«t fleiUly, «id mUkvu mon 
will durtag dw ooB^ yeui. 

No tquidii^i^ Iqp a city oouidl 
can enwe tte memory of thoM 
chydreo'i fint at Aey exfriore ddi 
magk^lriaM. 

In ^Mvealn, foUts will re- 
mnriwr 19^atdw^ardMte^ 
ftmOtor JoRkn M^, a frind (rf 
a^qp, 1MB ^tm dovm Cor moMte, 
la^vSooihNartdErerideMtinn 

and^AMten,!^ w^eoimdher 
back nor ma 3^111 n tarvtoe — ~ 
wUhlhecaMlOB thttaponuneu 
aoltttoi mutt be fmmd fa the 



MoBtnay.IMdcafeattttaOMa- 
hoMC^bMU^aatfilteiteat 
cnt n^aeaOM^ toKM^H^ I 
tee dw ^ Mldno pM^ tano- 
»^tadleMiMry,orNriktoMa> 
fUAepteiNlreilbi.II 



taaoH^, I irtU lemonber 1993 
M a rtiM ar fnwtt. It nM my ftit 
^» a>| | i i iUi i g totteii^ofi^tBd 
ke^sf heua •— vMa keqi^ tte 
taia^tavpy.AttheaaawdiHe.1 
a4^d to ^tflag w»k a& a 
pBVHi ua a^noH nunv a new 




the 



^aaayev^ 
nw Mm i|MR % i^tf 



f^e. red or ^Dmv. We al ta« to 
Ma hen, w M ffl^ at wrt 0K 

Ite OJ. iM *o ihed Ui^ oa 
pMm to ov 

Oi ivmH 4HVWU jumw w —* mi 
adiiof htrlttaiabinBnd wtft^ 
proveo ^H ooHW i B C TBMBee tm i 



Wk teae memortot, I m^ fare- 
wal to I9ML Ftt toeie Ae in^Bt 
Mi^kAiaKlcitfi^iriBdWNU 



roiBting {Mui and ail. 

Ruining into die darkened street, 1 
called to several Jqjanese I saw. I can 
(xdy wonder what they thought, but 
one diing sure, dwy werai't going to 
s(op. HtwUy, 1 saw a young fellow 
who did s^. It todc some time lo 
.4nake him uiuierstand I wanted to 
MdDS him apresent of diat hu^ trird, 
roaming pan and all. 

I dra't believe Iw knew a word of 
Englii^. Buthe learned oiethittnight 
0£faii4himd)eturkByIsaid"Qirist- 
mas" ami weeach repefOed it several 
times before dw lo^ of bewilto- 
ment b^an to leave Ms £Bce. 

Norman Robarr, Somk Boston 

Til* Enduring Fniit Ciiit 

When World War n started I was 
in nunn' tndning in Richmond. Af- 
ter giKiuating I j^wd dw Navy and 
wyatiignedtotlwNavalHMi^in 
Bedwtda. My work widi qwcial di- 
ets direw me into associttkm wld} an 
ofal chtef who was in charge of bak- 
ii% aU dw holMay firuit cakM for 
piiratottid staff. 

After baking, each caire was wrqv 
ped in a white ctodi which had been 
soaked in Cognac. I was dw ludcy 
rec^ent d several of di^ cakes 
and dw foUowing year, when I re- 
cdved orden to a hospiod Alp, I sdll 
had one, i^ich I took w^ aw. 

Widi aU dw new experiraces and 
long bom on duty, I for<pMaU Aout 
the cidce. T!w next, Oiristmas found 
our Alp ta dw S(Midi I^ific. 

Rummaging Uinwi^ my cabin 
dedc my roommtte found tiw cake. 
Coulditbe any good? Yoib^ It was 
gnsadyswopedbyaUwhogotatttte, 
eqwcttlly dwe we were so fitf fifom 
homeradnotfei^veryairittnasy 
bidwwltryheaL 

Sue Ca/^tti, roAjiya, Wash. 



Out with old; in with the new 




The Real 
World 



By B.J. 


Sea- 


sioTu, senior col- 


umni$t 





Let's all work 
together and 
not apart 

I mMwe dwt dw Ammcao Civil 
Ubertws Unicm (ACLU) hu tdno 
dieposidontfiatbydkn^awoaun 
U) idace a ntti vity Kene in Ae Qptol 
to Rtobmoi^ sotte omcials have 
cimed a forum for odwr forms dT 
expe^n. 

K^ WUIto, SUMS director ot Ac 
ACLU, wrore dutt it would now 
encourage 
"other 
groups" to 
place signs, 
statues or 
other dis- 
plays aL dw 
Sate house." 
Exactly, 
and why MM? 
"Other 
gnMips"ha>« 
the same 
right to dis- 
play their 
beliefs and 
should be 
altowedtodo 
so. I am 
shocked dutt 
the ACLU 
would question the right of "odwr 
groqjs" to exinress dieir beliefs. In 
the past, dwy iiave always su^qxnied 
"odier groups" right to expms dwir 
bdiefs. Vvliat has caused this sudtoi 
change? 

The old argument Aat nativity 
scoies shouldnot be allowed becaine 
"other groups" might want to imt up 
their sips, statues, etc. just doeai't 
wash anymore. If gays want to (Nit iq) 
a di^lay at dw Capitol, so whitt? If 
Jews wrat to display Ae'moiond) at 
the Capitol for Hanuklodi, why nM? 
If African-Americans want to 
celebrttte kwanzaa by lifting Uack 
candles at Ae Ctfitol, let dmn. If 
flag burners want a dlqilay at dw 
C^itol, dwy have every right to do 
so according to dw Supreme Court. 
AAeists ^ouU not be excluded, 
becnise it is dwir right not to bdieve 
inOod 

New if dw ACLU reaUy wratt to 
do something to juitify their 
existence, why don'tthey invettigtte 
how it is Aat eadi year a Mtos Blade 
America conwst is held which 
precludes whites tarn conqwdng. It 
to true Aat Ae (xgiatdsxa deny Aat 
whites are excluded, but I douite Aat 
a white c(mi«amt wouU have mudi 
of a chance to win — but if ^ did it 
would be strange to have a wMto 
Miss Black America. 

Give me a break. The same goat 
for hundreds of other black 
orguiizations that exclwle whiles by 
dw very title (^ said o^nizttioii, 
BLACK, 

If Ae MissAnwrfca cootett wat 
changed to Ae Miss White Amoka 
contest, Ae ACLU would ga tpstic. 
The Justice Department would 
dtop^chhtmdredsoffecteralnunhato 
and lawyffs all o^«r dw place. Hie 
Supreme Court would go nutt. 
Billions of taxpay«doll«iwouU be 
spent on invesdgatkms, dtiet would 
bum and Ae libeato would be very 
unhappy. 

In dUs day and time when mott 
blacks and whites are striving to 
achieve a colwblind society, it seem 
smnge tiutt s(Hne people teem to be 
w(^dng towvd nme kind (d idf- 
impoted Mgr^tkm fw whatever 
reascm. Pdup Ae ACLU diouM 
look into Ato. 
Welcome to Ae real wt^ld. 



laatdalManmUi^^toiMnBiM 

Nov.Iwrieonal^&M^Mx^ 
peac^^^aidi^^yjoditalet for 
one a^ ifl. Ib|W !4w Y^ 



The Virgiiiia Bei^ Sun 

13t Sootk Roanaoat Road 

Suite 209 
Virginia BMch,Va.234S3 
TatepiiOMi(M^4M44M 

Pubttiiiir 
HuMiByMly 

EdMoiall^anter 
Inua Blown 



Vloterialb^ 



liU.lCnoliock 

the Vk^da Baadi Son to t<Ah 
UdMdtwy nUay i^Byidy AtWei' 
tioiM, Inc., lOCN) knnmy Mv«, 
hHiHii.Vlrsiiik23tSl.laeaii4aiai 
p^a^ paid to Rmi^ ^ql^aBd 
iMianri otny officM, fMmmm 
land idi^MdiM^itt UNO ^^mofy 
Mv«, Va^^ Vh^ria 33131. S^ 
talprion Rain: By tM& nMnwui 
wiftk 40 nitot of V^^ BmA. 
Vs., OM yHT, $14.93, two ya«^ 
etJO. Vir^ito nd MRh Caretea, 
em ywv, iltM, two yMs, $SMi, 
AU ^« iMM ona ^1^ K2A^ Mo 
i^n, 04.M. ^^Ma to advme. 

(Mw B]^ PtMeMkiH Mm- 
P^m: Ite OtMyHto tern, Ha 
fti^Mi^ 'nmae, "At lldnNMr 
Mtw^T^^mw^Ttowi QMaaa, 
Hm M^pwihBt Maamnif, Tta 



«p 



iW^ 



Viiginia Bach Sun, Friday. December :». 1995 3 



Starting out a new year 
with goals and purpose 




The 

Mayor's 

Report 

Mayw Meyera 
Oberndorf 



As we start a new year, I want lo 
fskc this qjpottunity to sfia% with 
you the goals th« the Virginia Bttch 
City Oxacii Im set for the city of 
Viiginia Beach. 

Each year, the VirginiaBeach City 
council me^ to set goals f(ff the ci^ 
and u> chat ingress we have mait 
toward 
reaching 
t^se goals. 
Through 
these stra- 
tegic plan- 
n i n g 
sessions, the 
city couiKil 
hascmteda 
vision to 
guideourcity 
into the next 
century. We 
discuss stra- 
tegic long- 
and short- 
term options 
for the city. 
We set goals 
in order of 
priority and 
then come up with strategies to 
achieve these goals. Our Operating 
Budget and Capital Improvement 
Program are based on thesepriorities. 
Let me review some of the goals city 
council has set for our city: 

■ Economic Vitality — explaining 
job opportunities, businesses, tax 
base. In the first 1 1 months of 1995, 
15 new businesses announced plans 
to locate in Virginia Beach. They 
bring with them more than 1 ,400 new 
jobs and $39 milhon in investment in 
the city. 

In Octobo', we announced at a news 
conference attended by Gov. George 
Allen thatAvisRent-A-Car is lociOing 
one of its three reservations, 
administration and accounting centers 
in Virginia Beach. Virginia Beach 
came out the winner in a hotly- 
contested r^e to the Unish as Avis 
considered 10 locations in four 
different states. Avis will invest mcne 
than $10 million and is constructing 
the largest office building in Virginia 
Beach in the Center Pointe Office 
Park. The new Avis location will also 
mean 500 new jobs fw Virginia Beach 
residents. And they plan to expand 
their operations in the future. 

Lately, Virginia Beach has 
welcomed a number of "high tech" 
companies to our city. These 
canpaniesofferhigh-payiqg, quality 
jd)i to dur citizens. While our city's 
roots go back to 1607, we have 
evolved into a growing, vibrant city 
with many high tech companies. 

We're also seeing established 
Virginia Beach conpaniesUkeLillian 
Vernon and Stihl Inc. undergoing 
major expansions of their current 
facilities. In 1995, 16 companies 
expanded, creating 793 new jobs and 
$56 million in investment 

■ Destination point for tourists 
through develcqimentof activities and 
mailceting strategies. 

Virginia Beach is continually 
working to enhance the resort area 
for our residents, as Vf&ll as the 2 
milliffli people who visit us each year. 

The Resort Area Beautification 



Prc^ram is a $60 million facelift to 
tfie ooanfiont that began in 1987. 
The |8Q)«n imiliMte im|m)vemetts 
to Atbntk AveniK, fdjacent si(te 
stre^sidb(MT!vraIkc(Mmectori»rics 
from the Rudee Loq) tt) 42nd Stte^ 
The 24th Streetftuk is aone-half city 
bkx:k i»ric akuig the oc^nfirtmt diiat 
includes permanent entertainment 
features. Atlantic Av^iue and the 
B<»fd«^lk are a showcase we are 
proud to put on display for (Mir 
residents and visitors. 

Virginia Beach benefits from 
tourism in many ways. Several 
thousand Virginia Beach businesses 
employ 12,000 fuU-time and 9,000 
part-time summer workers. The 
tourist industry generates more than 
$500 million in total spending each 
year. Toivism provides significant 
and sustainable ecoiomic boiefits to 
the community through job 
opportunities and tax revenues. 

■ Quality education for lifelong 
learning. 

Vnginia Beach isacity with quality 
schools and outstanding students. Our 
students consistently score above the 
national average for all gr^e levels 
on achievement tests. Each school 
has formed a School Planning 
Council, made iq}of school personnel 
and parents. Their mission is to 
develop and implonent a strategic 
plan for their school. 

■ Stable city finances define 
services aid allocate revenues. 

The city of Virginia Beach has 
made a concerted effort to control 
e;q}enditures. The State Aiulitor of 
Public Accounts shows Virginia 
Beach with the lowest per capita 
expenditures of comparable 
jiaisdictKNis in the state. 

Virginia Beach has one of the 
lowestcity employee per capita ratios 
in the state —7,12.3 anployees pa 
1,000 residents. Virginia Beach is 
among the lowest in the county for 
cities of similar peculations. 

■ Safe community where citizens 
and visitors have a feeling of safety at 
any time in any place. 

Our latest citizen satisfaction 
survey showed that nine out of 10 
citizens feel tfiat their neighborhood 
is a safe place to live. Eighty-nine 
pax:ent believe that Virginia Beach 
in genoal is a safe place to live. For 
eight years in a row. statistics from 
the U.S. Department of Justice 
showed Virginia Beach with the 
lowest overall crime rate of cities 
with a population of 250,000 to 
700,000. 

This consistent ranking is no 
accident. It is a direct result of some 
innovative programming by our 
police Deiwtment and other city 
dei»rtments, as well as involvement 
by our citizens. Our community 
policing program works side by side 
with citizens to solve the problems 
that often lead to crime in 
neighborhoods. 

We'll look at scxne additional goals 
for our city next week. In the 
meantime,letmetakethisopportunity 
to wish you and yours a voy hai^y 
aixl healthy new year. 

Helen Spore, administrative 
assistant to the mayor, contrti>Med to 
this column. 



Beach police seek help in 
local thefts and assult 




Virginia Beach police are 
investigating the thefts of movi^ 
from video stores. So far, thetheves 
have only been captured security 
camera. A tip to Crime Solvers could 
change that 
and earn you 
a cash re- 
ward. 

On several 
occasions in 
November 
and De- 
cemba.diree 
men stole 
nKJvies fitm 
Video Ex- 
press, Block- 
buster and 
Movie Time 
stores 
throughout 
Virginia 
Beach, The 
men mainly 
^^^^^^^^ seemed in- 
^~'"^~~~'~ terested in 
Disieytq^es, 
but ha^ also stolen otters. One (rf 
the mm distracts the employes 
while the (^er two hide the movies 
in a shotting 1^. 

The mai are tfcscribal as white, 
in their late 2(te or early 3<^. Two 
had m ustaches «kI dark hair u> tittir 
^KNilders and wore baseball caps. 
The Mrd mm \iras clean shaven and 
iMxeamuUcotor«lttipedsweaKr. 
If ^w have iofom^n itoat the 
thefts, tte kic^mi of dtt movies or 
tte Meotity of Uie m^i. ci^ Crime 
Mv»s at 427-0000. 

A'Z-ymt-cMwmmimsmactBi 
mA wamUf msmtted in ha vait- 



Crime 
Elvers 

By Detective 
Michael G. Der- 
went, Virginia 
Beach Police De- 
partmertt 



A^^^^^^^^' 


K\ 


1 m^'^ 


■t 


>-.., 









Aspect 

m»iL De^tives med your help in 
identifying a omipcmie of the man 
we are looking for. 

Cta Wedn^ckiy morning, Dec. 6 at 
about 2 a.m., the wtrnio! wm awak- 
ei»d by a man in hec be(k«mi who 
ssmally^sffiiltBdhermdMttroiigh 
the fimtdocr. Itie attack ot^nnied in 
the 200 block of Soith Budding 
Avails in the Woodriure ^wta^it 
compkx. 

Police are kxdm^ for a black mm, 
in his tate 20s w ^y 3(^, dXMt 6- 
feet tan, 165 poumis with a rMdium 
l»il4HehadiAon btack^wiih 
scwie pey ml • tf|^ n^tedie. He 
"ms wi^ru^ « brown jacto nd a 
hown ttid tM bu^sall o^). 

Afl)me recoptziif Ae mn in the 
compMite m luving infcmnattai 
shookl oil Dime Solids at 427- 
0000. Rew«^ of 1^ » %\fm are 
p«U far nfomatioB dM taids to ai 
aire^C^toaiewArwpiffedtogi^ 
Ihev name or i^ify in cent 



Up close and personal 



By VICTORIA HECHT 
SimEdilor 

When Pam Shearin and her two young 
dai^htera want to spend some quality time 
tc^ed^-, Aey don't turn on the tu^ for car- 
toons. Instead, they instinctively rca;h f« a 
book — just as Shearin did years ago as a 
little girt growing up in Smith Norfolk, where 
she lives to this day. 

That love of the written word — and the 
wonderful world in which it can lead — paid 
off. Not only is Shearin now an edocdXot at 
Indepemknce Middle School in Virginia 
Beach, she is now its Reading Tejcher of 
the Year and has been nominated for the 
Virginia State Reading Teacher of the Year 
aw^ud. 

An always-smiling woman with an affiMe 
personality, she settles into an interview just 
as easily as she slips behind the desk to 
teiK:h a class. 

Upon being named Reading Teacher of 
the Year, Shearin was cited for the unique 
rapport she establishes with students and her 
relentless goal of raising their self-esteem. 
She was also lauded for having a definite 
knack for choosing just the right words to 
encourage and uplift the many at-risk and 
disadvantaged youths with whom she works. 
When a youngster falls short of a goal, she 
convinces him that any improvement is a 
success of which he can be proud. 

Currently Independence Middle School's 
Commimication Skills Teacher and respon- 
sible for administering the Literacy Passport 
Testing program, Shearin always finds time 
to pick up a book and share it with her in- 
dents. 

"I just love reading to the class — and 
they love it, too! I try to use expression and 
.different faces; I find diat more students vol- 
unteer to read after that." she grinned. "Plus, 
it helps me at home when I read to my own 
children. TTiey really do enjoy listening to 
someone read that way." 

A graduate of Oscar Smith High School 
and Virginia State University with a master's 
degree in reading, Shearin always kn^jw 
deep down that somehow, one day, she 
would become m educator. After all, it does 
run in the family. Both of her parents were 
teachers, as is her husband. 

"As a child, I always looked forward to my 
mother and father reading to me," she re- 
membered. "Of course, some stories I liked 
Daddy to read in his deep, masculine voice. 
They- (the parents) were real readers." 

Just as her^parents encouraged her to seek 
a career in education, Shearin would never 
hinder her own children if they so desire to 
follow that same path. 

"I don't believe in discouraging. Actually, 
I want it to stay right in the family!" 

When she came out of college, Shearin's 
first job was in Keysville as a small school. 
Then she came to the Virginia Beach Public 
School System, working initially at B.F. 
Williams Elementary ft-om 1979-86. She 
joined Independence in '86 and has been 
there ever since. 

"I really taught reading ever since I began 
teaching," she explained. 

A strong believer in the phonics method of 
teaching children to read, she also incorpo- 
rates strategies from "Reading to Learn" in 
her lessons and enjoys "paired reading," hav- 
ing stronger readers help weaker readers. 

Shearin also keeps an eye out for students 
having difficulty mastering litatu:y. 

"I search for students who arc having prob- 
lems," she said. "Yes, some of them have at- 
titudes, but I guess it's b«:ause they're fiiis- 
trated. Eventually, though, they come 
around." 

One of Independence's most dedicated 
teachers, Shearin likes to joke that her car is 
one of the first in the parking lot in the 
morning and one of the last in the afternoon. 




Many days she works beyond normal school 
hours giving students extra help and some 
one-on-one attention. 

"I'm a strong believer in teaching your 
kids to be successful, not matter what it 
takes," she said matter-of-factly. "Of course, 
I always i»'aise diem and look out -for the 
ones who aren't strong readers." ■' 

Shearin is also a believer in making stu- 
dents "think fcH- them^lves," rather tlum just 
"feeding" them information on a chalklxwd 
and making them copy it. When she asks 
them which they prefer, sometimes they say 
the "copy" method. But when Shearin 
queries as to which makes them learn more, 
they admit helping themselves is better. 

When she's not in the classroom at Inde- 
pendence, Shearin can be found at First 
Baptist Church-Elm Avenue in Portsmouth 
doing what she does best: teaching. A Sun- 
day school instructor, her zest for education 
doesn't end at the completion of a woit day. 

"I just enjoy working with people," 
Shearin said. "Sometimes it's so hard for me 
to say 'no' because I love what I do. There 
are never enough tours." 

Still, it's easy to s^ Shearin's top priority. 

"My husband likes to joke that %hool al- 
ways comes first," she laughed. "I guess I 
was just destined to do this. It's a reward in 
itself knowing that I have helped a child to 
succMd." 

Name: Pamela Shearin. 

What brou^lit you to this area: I 

was bom here. 

Hometown: South Norfolk (now 



Chesapeake). 

Nickname: Pam. 

Occupation: Teacher. 

BCarital Status: Married to Wilbert A 
Shearin, a teacher at Booker T. Wash- 
ington High School. 




Children: Two daughters: Alexandra 
Shearin, 6, who is In first grade; and, 
Jasmine Shearin, 5, who is in kinder- 
garten. 

Favorite moTles: "The Sound of 
Music," "Coming to America" and doc- 
umentaries. 

Magaslnes I regularly read: 

Health journals, Educational Leadership 
and Ebony. 

Favorite authors: Maya Angelou, 
Terry McMillan, Nikki Giovonni and R.L. 
Stine. 

Favorite night out on the town: 

Listening to Jazz at a club 

Favorite restaurant: Red Lobster. 

Favorite meal and beverage: 

Shrimp, baked fish and tea. 

What most people don't know 
about me: I cani say "nol" 

Best thing about myself: I love 
working with chiMren. 

Wont habit: Putting things off until 
the last minute. 

Pets: I do not own any. 

Hobble: Reading. 

Ideal vacation: Traveling to the 
Hawaiian Islands, such as Oahu and 
Maul. 

Pet peevea: People making 
promises and rvA keeping them. 

First J(ri): Invokse derk. 

Worst J<A: General Foam Plasttos 
Corp. (making Chrtetmas trees). 

Favorite sports team: Pittsburgh 
Steelers and Los Armies L^ers. 

Favorite musician: Luther Van- 
dro^ 

I wouM Uke my epitaph to r^A 

"Pam enH>yed mitfcing iMople happy." 

If I KCd^^ $1 mtUlon: I wnuld 
pay off my IwMwkTs biNs, tstabHth a 
trust fund for my daughteiB' edtjcatton 
md give to try church. 

tf I lu^ 10 minute on m^kmal 
television: I «M3uki ten an «kJcM>rs 
that every chikf can learn if ^ pn^Mr 
teachif^ strat^ies are usmi. Hm m^n 
effort pays off. 



■immmmmi 



^^^^^^m^m^mgmmammmmmmmmmaammamamammmmattttattttatM 



^^s^ xm^^ 



m^mm 



wm^m^^^^m^^ 



mmmmmrm\ ■ mp 




Comedian Carlin brings 
hilarity to Wlliett stage 



WiUett H^l is pleased to pmeai 
for om ^^ only, on HM^, Jn. 
12 tt S p.m.. dw ev^{^y Qeo^ 
C^ta. BdcM are on we now for 
^0. M a«Ms «e reserved. 

OrttUt IB i cCTB u ^triwd Bawd \^ 
omiecttn, pnfoms more ikn 100 
cmcwtt a year, iwt mna|^ u> 
{riay ctose Mention to anoAw of 
his cveer goals: actin|, He has 
perfumed in such movies as 
'C^ttaiKWS Fortune," "Bill and 
Ted's Excellent Adv^ture" tai a 
well-regarded turn in Barbra 
Sii^sand's "Prince <X Tid«." 

While Carlin tecs little more to 
prove in the standup fleld, he 
continues to tour and work in ftoot 
of live audiences, because is he 
puts it, "I love creating and 
developing new material, ud die 
direct, immediate responses ftcm a 
Uve audience is like nodiing I out 
axl)lain.'' 

Prefwming as tlw og^iing act for 



Carlin will be ^median D«mls 
Blab. Blair, • piot^ (rf Rodn^ 
Dangeifldd, is m awtMnplMed 
screenwrito', wng«^ter, muicim, 
^^iger md comic iCKv. He co-nmM 
the hit movie "Basy Mmty" ami 
had two cameo RdM fai the film. He 
hu also tppund on 'Tlw Tcmii^t 
Show" uid "Tlw Lafc Show." 

Ttekets c« be parekued k any 
TktomfiastBr toraBon. Inchidiiig tlw> 
WUM Hall Bm (^fice, or charge 
by phone, 671-8100. 

WiUett Hall, a 2.000 seat 
audltt»ium Is sitoMed in a quiet 
residoitiid community ud offen 
plenty of free pnAing, only it^ 
from the front (fajor. llietiKUtarittm 
has indmate seating with dw last 
row of seats otdy 175 (eel torn dw 
stm. Willett Hall also boaita dw 
best acoustics in HamfKon Roach. 
The hall is accessible for die 
dis^led. I^ directions, call 393- 
5141. 



niNNY MAMI (^nwdtoR 6Mf|i C^to wM ortME M biMMr md Imi| 
of tricfci to WMott IM MXt montb for • iM^h^Mid ovwdi^ 

Beach Center for the Arts explores 
The Work of Art' next month 



The Virginia Bewh Center for 
ti» Arts will soon present "The Art 
ofWorkrThcWorkofArt" 

This fascinating exhibition pairs 
visual artists with non-arts 
im^B^Oittls to expkm each outer's 
working life and to create p(»mits 
of one another. The original 
exhibition was curated by The 
Working Aru Group, three 
int^joidnit COTttm working out (tf 
Washington. D.C. The Center for 
eh Arts will present the original 
exhibition and brraden it with the 
addition of eight pairs of local 
artists Md wm-aits im)fessk)nals. 

The opmng receinion will take 
place Friday, Jan. 19 from 6 - 9 
p.m. Refreshments will be s^ved 
courtesy of The Dumbwaiter. 
Music will be provided by The 
PwchRockcrs. This event is free. 
The exhibition will renain on view 
tluough Miuch 3. 

"The An of Work" curators 
attribute a lack of understanding in 
our society partially to the 
increasing ghettoization of our 
work lives. They created the project 
in an attempt to Imdge the barriers 
thrown up by the increasing 
complexity uid specialization of 
ourixofi^kms. 

In die exhibitkm catalogue the 
curators stated, "This lack of 
umlaii^ing (tf tte woik w odter 
ivofessions impovaulim both die 
community and the 
individual—potentially we^ening 
die racial MhIc." Their Ix^ was 
dut by learaing of moOi^s «Kxk, 
participants would come to know 
that pttsm b^bet and discover new 
ways to qjpoach dwff own mA. 

In October 1W5. dte Virginia 
Bach C^Mo- for te Arts ho^d Ae 
kick-off reception for die local 
pro^ct Two of dw cvMOT from 
Wi^in^M. Susm OMta« aiKl 
Rktod ^iM, mirinned dw piQ^t 
in d^ail. The Misis Mrf M»«tti 
pofessiomls met mA Vim md 
nch «w awped a pmimt. Each 
pair mM iii«e tinrn te^ dw fldl 
Md^ywhner. 

Tlw arUsu will uw whatt^w 
Style or R^tta suitt dim te o^ate 
their portraits; the non-arts 
potmMnds wUl uw tte nnis 4^^ 
dwir ft^^em — a taww may 
el^t to dmw op a will, tw 



example, cm' a carpenter may decide 
to create a special deceptive piece 
— to r^resent dieir parties. Bach 
participant will deliver their 
comptoed pcMftrait to dw Cent« in 
rarly January. 

The local participant pairs an: 
Kac^ Cviwal, painiv, and Waller 
ThompKm. assistant profesK>r of 
Education; Linda Draper, painter, 
and Dr. Larry Colen, plastic 
surgeon; Anne lott. gcs^ic artists, 
and Eric Worden, 
radio/entertainment personality; 
Suzanne Mastr^co, painter, and 
Louisa Sbnyhwn, Virginia Beach 
City Council; Craig Nilsen, 
painter/sculptor, and Brace Ely, 
carpenter; Bob Sites, |»inter, and 
Judy Brown, executive vice 
president and chief c^)»ating dTico-, 
FHC - Options Mental Health; 
Debbie Small, painter/sculptw, and 
Andrew Fine, attorney; and, Brenda 
Wright, fimign^ka, «id SyAwy 
Meen,(^. 

The center is located at 2200 
Parks Ave. at die westbound 
entraiKe to Intestate 44. 



Students show 
off talents too 

Arts Midents tt fcm Vi^{inia 
Beach public schools have be«i 
invited to particpoe in a special 
outreach pro-am in coijunctitm 
widi "The Art of Woit: The 
Work of Art." The itudenu 
followed the same basic 
guidelines as dw {vofessional 
artists, with the excejKion that 
d^ {Wttss «^e not 10 cr^e a 
poftrakofthesiadeM. 

Uw eteeirioiri Qljeoi^ is tt) 
help sAdent grin indg^ in to a 
number of diffnent car^n, 
especially in the areu of 
satfivi^ and pnMem aohrtag, 
while also dalh^ widi ac^^ 
issues. Their voA wtU be 
d^b^ in dw CMf^a a^Kt 
prilsyJan. IfOra^MKAS. 

nvticipatiag actoslt Iwltte 
Codce Ite^tary, Of^ Bick 
kMd^ ^tf SoHtai Oms Md 
Omu Ufeei 1^^ MosL 





ow •^■w ■ ••(w ^" 



m* ttnk, Wiymt Potu, flny tort mmI Mnv Mmmmo tamiMiln tho biti of tin lOi 
of tto mmk m '^Potovm* noir at Uw Noimri ha. 



Smash hit 
•Forever Plaid' 
returns to 
Founders Inn 



"PorevR- naid" is back once 
again to take Hampton Roads by 
storml Aftn mondis of playing 
to record-breaking audience, 
"Forevw Plaid" returns to die 
Found»8 Inn Dinner Theater for 
one wetdwid only! 

This impeccable musical 
comedy, written by Stuart Ross, 
is about a young 
semiimfessional 19SOs male 
quaitm which was killed suddenly 
in a car accident just minutes 
before dieir first big musical 
debut. Miraculously, they are 
given one last chance to perform 
the show diey never got the 
(qjportunity to in real lifs. 

Don't miss )^i q>portunity to 
hear die excc^onal harmonies 
«id smoodi, tight vocalizations 
of die Plaids in their nostalgic 
return. 

"Forever Plaid" has enjoyed 
rave revues and .tremendous 
swcess nationwide as well as 
locally. When it {mmiered in 
New York City in 1985 it played 




CNA CNAI TN oiit of "hiiMr PMr hmii R ip to tonti of tho 
'Ml ft Uw liORtfore IM MiOM' Thiotor. 



to sold-out audiences for more 
Uian three-and-onc-half years. I 
San Diego's venerable Old Gtove 
Theater it was the highest 
grossing show in dieir history. In 
die last 10 years it has sold out 
in cities all over the country. 

The Founder Inn Dinner 
Theater's prodiKtion of "Forever 
Plaid" won the Port Folio 
Theatrical Achievement Award 
for Best Musical of 1995. It's 
musical director, Kadii Caplan, 
also won die Port Folio Award 
for Best Musical Director. Public 
performances of "Forever Plaid" 



are Thursday, Jan. 11 • Sunday, 
Jan, 14 arS p.m. widi dinner 
seating at 6:30 p./m. The {ffice 
for thea^ only is $22 Md for 
dinner dwater is $35.50. 

For reservations, call 366-5749 
and for group sales of 30 or m(»e 
call 366-5779. Prompt response 
aiKl resra^tims are recommoided 
due to previously sold-out 
performances. 

The Founders Inn and 
Conference Center is located at 
5641 Indian River Road in 
Virginia Beach at Exit 286B off 
of 1-64. 



Reporter tells the ultimate 'Story' 



The Generic Theater's second 
show of dw 1995-96 Mason, "How 
I C3ot That St<»y" by Amlin Gray, 
is a highly visual production 
featuring dw TittewaM* directing 
d^ut (tf Cari Derek McKinney. 

The play, flm presnit^ by die 
Milwndcee Rep^ry Tlwitter in 
1979, is die story of a young 
reporter's odyisey into the 
complexities and ccmmdtotiiMS of 
war bi a fictitHulized StMidwast 
Asin country. 

bi 1966, ^or to bU ana in dw 
tbeM«, i^i^vniihtOiiv was dnfted 
into dw Army to tern in Viemam. 
A conscientious objector. Gray 
became a medic. Following his 
discharge, he fint studied acting, 
dwn play writing. In 1977, Gray 
became a resident playwright at the 
Milwaukee Repotory tlw^. His 
wok hu «vn«i him Gug^dwim, 
Rockefeller and National 
Bi^jwmeitt for dw Arts grants. 



McKinney, a graduate of 
Southern Mcdiodisi University's 
Theater Department, describes die 
play as "a young, naive, reporter's 
jouniey into a landscape of chaos 
where cause and effect don't 
opaate." 

"The war itself is chaos," said 
KfcKinney. "The reporter questions 
who's pushing the buttons and 
why. He can't make out the trudi 
and the chaos eventually consumes 
him. It's also about die role of die 
media in war. I want die audience to 
und^^tand dwt what they watch on 
TV is somebody's qiinion." 

McKinney describes his style as 
visual. 

"You have to diink about what 
dieat^ is for die MTV generation," 
he said. "You have to use lou of 
multi-media if you're going to 
bring dwm in." 

The set of "How I Got That 
Story" is lay»ed widi newspapot 



onto which images and words are 
{mjected. A 12-foot-bank of seven 
televisions border one side of die 
stage. 

Edun Marten, who earned critical 
acclaim fot his perfomuuKW in "Tlw 
Swan," plays the reporter. 
Jnsnyne Dizon. Kelly LaGreca and 
new-comer Ktatt Meyer complete 
die cast. 

"How I Got That Story" t^wns 
Friday, Jan. 5 and runs dunugb 
Sunday, Jan. 28. Evening 
performances an Thursday, FrMay 
and Saturday at 8 p.m. Sunday 
mtttawes are at 2 p.m. 

Tickets are $8 for lliutsday and 
Sunday performances and $10 fa 
Friday and Saturday. Student and 
senior discounts are available m 
Thursday and Sunday only. For 
reservations, call the Generic 
Theater at 441-2160. 

The Generic Theater is an 
independent. non-profit, 
professkmal dwats'. 



Wesleyan offers sacred music courses 



Virginia Wesleyan College's 
Center for Sacred Music offen a 
nufflba of coun^ to area diureh 
mukdans md a^ea who have an 
aaeiUt in dnnch music. 

Tlw duee cmnM off«ed f<x dw 
s{^g vam ve: Qiikiren's Choirs 
(2 CEUs), Jan. 15 - Feb. 24; 
Chcmd DmAict^ (4 CEUs), Jn. 
22 ■ A^ 1; nd Qmd Umum 
(2 C^Us), April 8 - Itey 20. Uw 
ttition is $5S p^ O^. Stwtats 
fluy reg^AR 19 ttvoi^ ^ fttt 
day of mcA elan. Vv addi^Mud 
information, cw^t dw Adult 
Soidies Office at 455-3263 n* 
Drtley (Mm m 4SS-337e. T^ 

pf^im dlWClOf it fff^yf ^irgiiui 

Tte Chttdhm's Cton class is 
geared toward ae<iuiring an 
miea^a^ ot ctaiUbm's vmcm, 
devfloplni Mcbni^ue and 
Ma^^tag wMto Mmwe. TMs 

dw RM Ihm^Man Church 



Uw Qioral Conducting class is a 
pactical coune offering basic and 
advanced skills, including 
conducting patterns, vocal and 
dKsal tedmM]UM, diction, r^mffal 
teduwiuM, p^fanuuice [xac to uid 
conducting for die cn^gan console. 
This camu is taught by Dudley 



The Choral Literature class is a 
survey of the periods of music 
history through the anthems 
{v^endy avaiUdJle te dw avoi^e 
choir. This course is taught by 
Debra Carr. director of Music 
Ministries and Fine Arts at 
Monumental United Methodist 
Church in I^vtnnoudi, 



Reception benefits Hope House 
Foundation for the disabled 



H^ Hmte Foun(toti<m, a non- 
prMoq^udaiian fisimded n 1$^ 
w^kdi |^DvM» sui^xMt serv^ for 
people with developmental 
^^MUtiM, is |riea^ to a^ooKW 
« Artito Itocq^on to be hM m 
Im. U tnm 5 • 7 p.m. at te I^w 
KOQM Amadation 1%rift Sh(^, 
tocM^ tt IMO MmtiMllo Ave. in 
NorMDL , 

The Hqw House FoundatiM 
IMft S^ will fe«n» a tocal 
pi^m, im$ Bidl^ce. Tte vti« 



wUl whiUt hw w<Mk duwgtoM 
dwmcmfttfJainvy. 

The H(^ House Fonndatim 
TMft SlH^ wOl flMivs a iww aitiM 
mc^ mmdi. Ilie dirift libop wiU 
reiwive 20 percent of dw tftists' 
sides. 

Bigte wtiM are on mhibit for 
dw t^^Mm (tf Hmeuhei, 1^ 
tfs Stefin Vm Rad-Onm^ft, Fi^ 
Zetlln, Jane Ballmce, ArMld, 
DwtMhy Ckwtfag, Julhi Wtz. K J. 
Mitetell md Nuicy M. Vaughn. 




>U«iid(»» for Ae Utde Itetire 
fdhxmm&'tjKoiae&onotihe 
Saloonkeepw'i XHtaghter," a 
mtiodmna, will be hM on Jan. 3 • 
4 at 7:30 p.m. in dw dieaier of 
Wilion High School in 
n>rtimoudi. The play will be 
preMMited on Feb. 2, 3, 4, 9, 10 md 
11. 

Needed an adult femalM of my 
a^ md males, aged 18 to 40. 
Audidonen are aslred to bring • 
laepand ptoce of music to ring. 
Those auditioning will read 
setocdons firom dw s»i||^ 

If you teve additiroal qiwstions, 
caU dw dwaier at 488-7866 or 483- 
4118. 

I^e Litde Theaffe of Portsmoudi 
is a nonivoft organizttion. 



The Ardsu Oallwy will be 
showing m exhibit of miniature 
paintings by dw memberi of tte 
Artiatt at Work Cooperative in oil. 
watercolor, paAel md photography 
Jm. 6 - 29. 

Ilie Artists Gallery is located tt 
24di Street and Padflc Avonw and 
is opm Tuesday dtrough Satiuday 
from 10 a.m. • 5 p.m. For more 
information, call 425-6671. 



Marion Crank will instruct a 
class in smocking at Norfolk 
Senior Cmter, 92A West 21st St. 
on Friday, Jm. 19 and 26. Leant 
how to make teirioom gifu, such 
as smodwd clodting for tebies w 
doll clodies. Bring one skein of 
embroidwy floss, one yanl to 
matching one-quarter inch satin 
riUxm, a No. 8 emlsoi^ needle, 
sharp scisscmi md straight pins, 
Class fee is SlO. Stop by dw cent« 
today and see a sanqple of smocking 
w«k diqjiayed at die fSnmt dealt. 
Register by Jm. 16. 



Join die Virginia Beach Center 
for die Arts for an afternoon of 
theat^ when die center presents 
"Threads," a unique series of 
monologues, on Sunday, March 3 
at 2 p.m. 

The play, a series of vert)al 
"portraits" of women marks die 
closing of die portrait exhibition 
"The Art of Work, The Work of 
Art" A collaborative effort among 
five tocal womm, it also marics dw 
beginning of National Women in 
Ifistory Mondi. 

The play is a celebration of die 
invisible tiireads tiiat connect 
women to each other. With 
poignancy and humor each 
monologue illuminates those 
personal revelations which, 
ultimately, creMe die fabric of a 
womm's lijfe. 

Written by Abbie Kirmm, a 
^student of creative writing, die 
monologues wiU te perfiMmed by 
Ann Heywood. recipient of die 
1994 Portfolio Award for Best 
AcO^MS of dw Year, and directed by 
Karen Biwhteim, who is well- 
respected by supporters of 
community theater as a 
ch o re< y i y her, (Urector md actress. 

Dimensi(»is are added to die 
I»o(totk» by music educam ami 
songwriter Kay Warnal is Ziwtii, 
who will perform her <»iginal 
music, md by artist Jodie Prietoi, 
who will display clay sculptures 
dut were inqrired l^ Tiffnds. 

Tte production wiU benefit die 
Virginia Beach Court A{^inted 
Special ^vocate Fn^nun (CASA), 
a volunteer organization that 
«lvocMes fv (riwsed ukI neglected 
cUldim. 
Come enjoy die show and die 
nfXfUkm dwt fellows. "Hckeu are 
$10 etch. To puretese tfadcets a fw 
ftmhv informatkm, caU 459-8717. 



B.YO.B. 

(Irlng ymtr own bi|.) 

For man IdMS on reusing and 

rtducing,call: 1-aOO.tWII.OLIFE 



4 



^mk 



^9W««PW«««PP 



mm 



^^v^^^ 



Vfaynia Rftu ch Sun. Rriday. Dtgeanbor 29. 1995 5 



Keeping close ties at New 
Year's — even over the miles 




Off The 
Record 

ByMJ. 

Knohlock, 

reporter and 

guest columnist 



As you read dus column, I wiU be 
frolicking in the snow in New 
England, {»iq)ming to ring in tlK new 
year. 

lUs tinw (rf year always &mes 
and goes in such aftidi,lHit this year, 
I deci(M to slow things dawn a bit 
and take a vacation to ^ait o£f the 
new year the 
"right way." 
The ap- 
proach of 
New Year's 
Eve brings 
biu:k mem- 
ories of days 
of yore, 
when New 
Year's Eve 
wasaspecial 
day for my 
family. 
Everyone 
had their 
own way of 
celebrating, 
but we 
always 
managed to 
keep in touch around midnight. 

The youngest of four daughters, I 
was the last of the babysittei^, and 
often found myself at someone's 
house inchargeoftheirchildien while 
the parents went out and whooped it 
up. 

My parents and sisters were often 
found at the homes of friends or at our 
house with a small party. 

But no matter where you were, or 
what you were doing, when midnight 
rolled around, there was always the 
telephone. 

1 remember one particular 
babysitting adventure when I was 
about 14, whoe a 1 -year-old and 3- 
year-old, whom I'd never even seen, 
were nestled in their beds upon my 
arrival at their house. 

Mom and Dad had left numbers to 
be reached in case of emergency, and 
insbiictions for bottles and snacks if 
the children woke up. 
And then they were gone. 
It was a chilly night, and 1 was all 
alone in a huge, old, creaky mansion. 
I had only Dick Clark on television to 
keep me company. 

At ^ut 1 1 :30 p.m., the baby boy 
woke up; and wandoed into the living 
room to And a strange sitting in his 
father's favorite chair. 
Instant tears and screaming. 
At 1 1:3S p.m., his sister joined the 
fray. 



As I sat in this 

creepy liouse 

with two little 

kids, I had to 

wonder if this 

was a sign of 

what the new 

year would 

bring. I was 

slightly 

horrified. 



At this point, I was close to tears 
myself, but decided to make the best 
of the nightmare. 

By 1 1:55 p.m., he was sucking on 
his bottle and she had a book. Bodi 
were nestled «i my lap, and Dick 
Clark enthusiastically warned us that 
the new year was only minutes away! 

As I sat in this creepy house with 
two little kids, I had to wonder if this 
was a sign of what the new year 
would bring. I was slightly horrified. 

Just after midnight, however, the 
phone rang. It was my mother. She 
andmy fatho* were at a friend' s house 
and called to wish me a happy New 
Year. 

She passed die phone to my father 
and then the hostess of the small 
shindig. 

By the time 1 hung up, 1 was feeling 
pretty good. A short while later, bodi 
chil(ben were back in bed, with a 
promise that Mommy and Daddy 
would be there when they woke up. 

Whew! I survived that.one! 

Over the years, no matter Where 
I've been or what I've been doing, 1 
always receive a phone call, or make 
one, right after midnight on New 
Year's Day. 

Somehow, the new year wouldn't 
quite be the same without it. 

1 guess it's just one of those things 
we t^e for granted until it's not there 
anymwe — or until we become a 
litde older and a little wiser, and 
realize that things don't last forever. 

Just the same, I'll have my calling 
card ready on New Year's Eve this 
year,dialing that old familiar numbo', 
just to start off the New Year right 

May yours be a festive one. 



Operation Blessing shares 
meal with less fortunate 



As many as 3,500 or more 
elderly, low-income, unemployed 
and homeless guests enjoyed 
holiday meal with all the 
^trimmings, live entertainment and a 
personal gift at Operation 
Blessing's 14th Annual Chrisunas 
Celebration "Love Warms the 
HearL" 

Local corporate, church and 
individual sponsors and hundreds of 
volunteers also participated in this 
year's event to help bring the spirit 
of Christmas to those less 
fortunate. 

This year's banquet was held 
recently at the Virginia Beach 
Pavilion. Pat Robwtson, founder of 
the Christian Broadcasting Netwcwk 
and Operation Blessing, and host of 
"The 700 Club," delivered a holiday 
message. Paul Thompson, recently- 
appointed president of Operation 
Blessing, and Ben Kinchlow, co- 
host of "The 700 Club," also 
participated in the program. 

"We wanted to provide a special 
evening for those who might not 
otherwise be able celebrate 
Chrisunas," said Thompson. "By 
doing so, we hoped to demonstrate 
our long-term commitment to 
support and build healthy 
communities both here in Hampton 
Roads and around the wcN-ld." 

The evening's festiviti^ feauired 
a dinner performance by gospel 
sin^r, Shirley Caesar, whose most 
recent release, "Stand Still" (1993), 
earned her a Grammy nomination, 
as well as special music by a 
Newport News violinist, Eric 
Taylor. In addition to a Christmas 
carol sing-along and a meal that 
inclw^ ham with cranbory saix^ 
Kalk^ potatoes, rolls, dessert ami 
a bevoi^e, each participant will 
also be eligibte fate one of several 
docrpri^s. 

Jmning the guests as table tests 
woe se^tri of the event's cwpowe 
sponsors. Some of the local and 
regional sponsors who contribute 
finaiKially or dratated goods and 
services to Operation Blessing 
iiKduM: flK CteMan Broatk^ng 
N«wwk (VirfWa Beach^, T««te 
& Little (Norfolk); Unisource 
(Norfolk. Richmond); Fmn Fresh 
(Norfolk)' Hambright, Cak^no A 
Downing (Virginia Beach); 
Fletcher, Bamhardt & White 
(Virginia Bc»;h); and, Kenmore 
Bivefc^jc Ocmqjffiiy (Richmarf). 



In addirion, several Hampton 
Roads churches also sponsored 
tables of guests including Calvary 
Revival Church (Norfolk), 
Kempsville Presbyterian Church 
(Virginia Beach) and Atlantic 
Shores Baptist (Virginia Beach). 

Operation Blessing, a 
humanitarian (vganization affiliated 
with the Christian Broadcasting 
Network (CBN), began hosting the 
annual holiday ouU'each in 1982, 
when CBN's employees asked that 
the funds for their annual Christmas 
tonquet be used to pay for a holiday 
meal for needy individuals in the 
Tidewater area. 

In an effort to expand this 
traditional holiday outreach, a 
variety of businesses and churches 
have also become sponsors. Every 
year since 1982, hundreds of CBN 
and Operation Blessing employees 
have served as volunteer hosts. 




Beach collegian tackles problem of illiteracy 



By DAWN TOLBERT 
School Correspondent 

While most of us are aware of the 
growing problem of adult illiteracy, 
Jeni Quesenberry of Virginia Beach 
is actually doing scHnething about 
it. As part of her work in the 
Bonner Scholar Program at Berry 
College, QiKsenberry has formed 
the Adult Literacy Corps, an 
organization dedicated to 
eliminating illiteracy in the Rome 
aea. 

Bonner SchoUffshq}s are awarded 
to serving students who are 
dedicated to community service. 
Bonner Scholars help others by 
p^orming 10 hours of community 
service a week during the school 
yeu SKi a total of 240 hours diuing 
Cat summer. Tte Bonner Sctolars 
ftt^ram, made pcKsible by fumbig 
from tlw Corella and Bertram F. 
Boms' FcMindation of Princeton, 
M.H., was begun at Beity in 1991 
ami cinmdy |rovid» sclMd^ships 

Quesenbeny has started her 
{n^tam Awn scratch, aldiough it 
is ^i^Kd to complement other 
literacy prop-ams in the area. 
Hoi^va-, she fee\$ ter ]Nt>ject is 
unique because ttf the emplusis it 
places on canmimiQ'. "The Adult 
Literacy Corps is a grass roots 



group that seeks to pull uitors from 
similar backgrounds and 
neighborhoods to tutor students. I 
fell that this type of program is 
well suited to the Rome 
community." 

Quesenberry also searches for 
tutors at local churches and 
colleges, and she emphasizes that 
there is always a need for 
volunteers. 

After graduation, Quesenberry 
plans to continue her efforts to 
eliminate illitoncy by iq^lying fcr 
and Entrepreneurial Service 
Fellowship. She hopes to expand 
her organization, and this 
fellowship will allow her to begin 
an additional to^ch of the Adult 
Literacy Corps in another area. 
Quesenberry believes that her 
experisKe wiA hs' current grmip 
will be of pm. benefit as the Mult 
Literacy C(V]B ontinti^ to Gipnd. 

Quesenberry, the daughter of 
Billy Quesenberry of Virginia 
Beach, b a ^na English iMtjo' at 
Bcny sid u nuaotng in wdolt^ 
and iMydwk^. In addition to 
forming the Literacy Corps, she 
volunteers at the Rome-Floys 
County Lilxvy mA imon a s&dnt 
^ddngiwGED. 

"Many people igOOTe adult 
iDiteraey. Wlutt tfiey dont vmdoe is 
diese a^te are fan^ 10 ^aid teir 



lives in shame, as illiter^y causes 
diem problems in every nspect of 
dieir lives," said Quesenbwry. 

"Just imagine as you drive 
through town that every sign you 
see in ivinted in Russian, and you 
can only begin to imagine the 
difficulties these individuals 
encounto' every day of their lives." 

Although Qiwsenberry spent a 
^leat (teal of time travelling as she 
was growing up, she says she was a 
somewhat of a disadvantage 
eccHKxnically, aldiough that is one 
of die ma^ reasons she has started 
this program. 

"Peopte that have been put down 
are much more willing to help 
others. I an v^ fortunate to be 
able to do the same. I really feel 
that beginning diis fvogram was 
my social responsibility. I just 
can't imagine no doing what I do." 

Quesenberry feels that her 
program is very rewarding. 
altlMN^ it does take iq) a lot of her 
ti^ ui r^ukes a g^^eat deal of 
le^OBsiMity — responsibility that 
c^bea^Mls^^. 

"I Kill lite to go lx»% ami listen 
to I^vid Bowie and ^t my age 
beawe I Ceel 90 nwch mcwe nature 
wteft Vm, ducting die Adult 
LtMacy Ovps. KMMtinKS it's a 
litde wmA 10 be die kate benise 
tiK rapooabitty is m^aiAMs." 




nmim 







W^H^^I^pil^,,^ jl... ,j, j,J,J,^.^^^^^^^WW^^^^^^^^^^^pi|||^|^^|^U^ 



wmm^m' 



w^ 



< Vkmrn Beadi Sim, ftidav. Decembg 29. 1995 



Branch named Beach's 
Outstanding Young Citizen 



D ContlmaMI l¥om Pig* 1 

ingdus.* 

3ruick oedits his involve- 
ment with the ttMirism scene 
and city couicil as giving him 
"credfl>ility and visibility" with 
diepeopte. 

Ov^ die years, whetho* a 
young man growing up and 
helping his fath^ ran the old 
Lynn-Dee Motel ot (grating 
the South Shore as his own 
boss, he has seen the strip 
peak as a grand resort, decline 
(he citK Gredcfest as the low 
point) mi tist apin. 

"As exciting as some of the 
things that have happened 
are," Branch said, listing the 
24di Street I^iik and odier pro- 
jects, "I think some of the 
things on the drawing board 
are even mon exciting." 

He also cites "as good a 
(city) council as you cm get" 
wwldng tf^ther as reason fcn- 
the success. 

Pttlling a pile stuffed 
thick with thank you notes 
from Beach visitors, locals 
and merchants. Branch paused 
a moment to reflect on his 
time in the {wblic eye. 

"This is put of die pleasure 
of being in public sovice," he 
smiled. "Boy, diis brings back 
the memories." 

Thumbing through a few 
brief messages of Uianks, he 



stumbled ^;n^ a note to him- 
self that would immediately 
go on his "to do" list. When 
somebody takes the time to 
write to Branch about their 
concCTns, he tries to respond 
promixly. 

"I worry that someone will 
fall through the cracks," he 
confesses. 

Branch is determined to 
make '96 an even more memo- 
rable year Uian '95. 

"I'm going to work even 
harder to try and respond to 
the people and move along 
this next generation of pro- 
jects. We need to take advan- 
tage of these opportunities 
now. Time is everything," he 
says succinctly. "Nothing's 
ever going to happen if you 
just sit back and wait for it." 

Branch grew quiet for a 
moment, a faraway loolf in his 
eye. Then he smiled at one of 
life's idiosyncrasies. 

"You know, my grandfather 
was the former purchasing 
agent for the city of Nwfolk — 
he had a real disdain for 
politicians. I always think, 
'Golly, Granddad, if you could 
see me now!" 

He quickly added, "But I 
don't guess I fill the typical 
image of a politician!" 

The Virginia Beach Jaycees ■ 
will honor Branch with a ban- 
quet to be held early in the new 
year. A time and place will be 
announced later. 



Waters run deep 



□ ContkHMd From ftga 1 

soothem Vii^nia Beach as an 
example "of how die land has bem 
inq»ct^ so dnunatically by man's 
activities." 

Use aqiuttic grasses are so vital to 
the bay's well-being, Clark 
c(mttnaed, pardy because they he^ 
reduce the wave tides which fiiither 
increase turbidity and erode the 
tanks. Gendy south winds and dry 
weather this summer increased 
salinity and helped to cleanse die 
witter. 

The question of how much 
salinity is hralthy is a controvosial 
oae, Ctaifc admits. While some 
blame increased salinity tas killing 
some species of plant life, he 
d^cribes it as "a bo(Hi for us." 

"You can talk to IS guys and get 
IS different opinions on die 
salinity,' Clark said. "But die salt 
does help to keqp the vmet clean. 
And die lack of rain this summer 
has kqjt die lun-off down." 

AldxM^ daoe arm't any large- 
moudi lass ii^ die bay yet, it's 
possiUe to catch dion in some of 
tte tributes, and dK striped bass 



are abundant in die open bay. And 
die shad, blue gill and sunfish diat 
are part of the bass' food chain are 
returning. This past summer was 
"unbelievable" for blue crabs, and 
he expects diere will be 4,000 - 
5,000 ducks winterihg around die 
bay's headwaters this year. 

On the down side, many 
of die canals, particularly (m die 
bay's west side, are impossible to 
navigate because of silt. "Things 
lo(dc real pcKitive in a lot of areas," 
Clark said, "but we still need to 
control the run-off on the west 
side." 

Clark suspects that increased 
urbanization will prevent the 
soutlwrn watershed firom tva being 
die {nistine area it once was. But 
adds that he still liken taking 
people on hunting and fishing 
expeditions and he still loves Back 
Bay. 

"I like being outdoors and being 
on the water," he said. "It's 
somehow different frwn being in 
die woods. Thoe's somediing about 
die water diat I like." 



Fifth plan presented 



D CoirtlnuMi Rwn Pig* 1 

that she was concerned that die 
low»^ pan of the city would be 
divkled. 

Splitting tte district vwuld have 
extraded dw districts too fat mirdi, 
she said. 

Vi(» Mayot Willian D. Sesscmis 
Jr. adced whe^r die borough 
oasas cm be usni fiir die di^rfets. 

City Anomey Leslie Lilley said 
tlutt die cms^i has to name die 



districts but diere is nodiing to 
prevent council from giving die 
districts the same names as the 
present b(Houghs where possible. 

Council will iulopt a plan for 
revi^ districts after die proposed 
plans are studied by die consultant, 
and a referendum on how council 
members will be elected — by a 
system that combines ward and at- 
large voting or by system where all 
Council members are elected at- 
large as diey are now. 



Teen mentorees play holiday Santa 



By MARGARET WINDLEY 
Sun Correspondent 

Children are mit the (xily txies in 
Vi^nia B^ch widi full stockings 
diesedB^ 

Thanks to the CARE 
(Community Action Resource 
Empowerment) Mentorship 
Afognun, young people tn>vlved in 
die fHTOgram have Adopted mtme 
local nursing homes, bringing 
Christmas presents to elderly 
residents and assisting them in 
odier ways as neected. 

Arcelious Carlisle, one of several 
local businessmen who provides 
mentoring or counseling U) youth 
in die program, stopped widi a 
group of young men at Beatrice 
Gregory's Nursing Home, one of 
four visitations diey did diat day. 
Tliey had brought small gifts of 
toiletries to the ladies and 
gentlemen being cared for at the 
home. 

Carlisle explained diat the CARE 
approach attempts to help young 
people by getting past the facades 
diat diey are apt to build around 
diemselves that could keep them 
from developing into successful 
citizens. 

"Young people today dcMi't really 
trust authority ot grown ups," he 
said sadly. "What we are doing is 
showing diem somecme cares. In a 
whole lot of cases diey don't have 



anyone who cares wNtt they (to at 
wtee diey go w what dicy do. We 
show dion that vt« care." 

Crediting Melissa Lee of the 
Housing Authority as his 
inspiration to join, he added diat 
once in the program as a menuir 
himself, he helped pdier additimal 
m^tcvs for die pt^ram. 

"I got some mcve men tc^edwr 
that are in different occui^tions. 
,Ever since the mentonhip started 
diree mondis ago we have h^ swne 
of diem diat are widi die program. 
When we have got everything 
going, we want to have the 
recreation department to help the 
oldef ones end up receiving the 
GE&, the ones that have dropped 
out of school, and g^ tut(»ing fOT 
some of die odier ones, dm younga 
ones that have been suspraided." 

Larry Chapman, one of the 
young men being menttned, smiled 
eam^y and said, "We just reandy 
started about a mondi ago. TheyVe 
dying to get young peqile off die 
street and get tl^em doing 
something constructive. The 
mentors are counselors and positive 
role models who came out of 
atuations like ourselves. They have 
gone on and got good jobs." 

He also thought of Lee of the 
Housing Authority as his 
inspiration. 

His group came, he said, because 
"We told Mrs. Lee we did not mind 




rih liB Ih* ii««iia^i lUaJ^Bi 

S5i?"*-?S !••■• *^'* '■•• «*"■'' ^ tlitiMtlwt H tin 
MMqr^MpMMhr tbt omi imlvttf l* Pnttet CAUL int wwk 
tb^rptfM It local bMim t* pw oit ChrMum prtwitt to 



carry weapons and diat they will 
stay out of trouble. 

The CARE mentors also provide 
transportation to take the 
participants out once or twice a 
week to play basketball or go 
skating or have a little party, but 
most important is die time that 
they speml on counseling. 



putting a smile on people's faces. 
Some of these people would have 
no Christmas. We tried to make 
diem feel better." 

There are about 20 young men 
receiving mentOTing dirough the 
pn^ram, which requires that diey 
sign a contract stating that diey 
will not be involved in drugs or 



City worliers spread joy 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



] 



By MARGARET WINDLEY 
Sun Con-espondant 

The holiday season is merrier 
these days for needy city 
schoolchildren, and it's thanks to 
die Holiday Connection, a ptogcsm 
of the Virginia Beach's Public 
School System's Social 
Work/Visiting Teachers 
Department 

"Our special project is the 
Holiday Connection," said Joyce 
Askew, supervisor of Social Work 
£uid Visiting teachers. 

Through die Holiday Connection, 
the department assigns different 
offices of die school board to buy 
presents for underpriveleged 
families who might otherwise not 
have much Christmas. Of cour^, 
the anonymity of the families 
involved is appropriately kept from 
die donors. 

"They are given a family to buy 
toys, clothes and food for at 
Christmas," she said. "No names 
are given, just numbers. For 
example, two adults and three 
children. Then my social workers 
pick up the gifts from the offices 
and t^e diem to die fanulies. We 
are in our fiMi year widi diis." 

Askew explained that her 
subordin^es, the social work^s and 
visiting teachers, find die families 
on visits and , secure their 
permission for the Christmas time 
assistance. 

"We find die needy families, and 
then we assign families to special 
offices," she said, adding that 
visiting teachers and »;hool ^Kial 
workers have fulfilled different 
educational requirements but 
poform similar functkms. 

"These families are not covered 
under other agencies such as Social 
Services ot die Salvation Army," 
she continue. "B«:ause the need 
was so Isetss, we could mit handle it 
ourselves. So many families w»e 
involved diat we could not even 
handle it as one office. So diat is 
why we involved die c«itral office." 

But she wanted to emphasize die 
worthwhile qualitv of die w(Hk. 

"TTie joy diat my social woika- 
expwknces in ^livning die% gifts 
are well wordi the ei^gy iwt into 




PhoM OyMwgiralWndlty 

6000 qUEEN WENCESUUST J^m Atlttw, tiperviSM- for VtrgWi 
Icf cb scbMi sodal warfccn, ei|«yi Nr •fflee Cbristmn tru, 
tktaklag alMit tlM imqr cfelUria wkMe CbrMnm was made 
brigtor becaasc of the HoMay CmmccUm pragram. 



diis." 

Of course, she said that the 
deputment's benevolent functions 
are not limited to die holiday 
seasOTi. 

"Throughout the year esch one of 
my social workers runs into a 
family diat may have b^n burned 
out. We gather as an office to 
collect clodiing, food, whatever is 
necessary. As emergencies arise, 
this is one of die functions of my 
people. We are here to help. Our 
focus is to {Hovide fOT die needs of 
children so diat diey can receive die 
education that they need, that is 
n«x»ssary, for sucxess." 

Shirley Pearson, a Virginia Beach 
school social worker, estimated diat 
ckKe to 50 Virginia Beach family 
are having a holiday season 
provided by the Holiday 
Coutfction. 

"Individual school board 
employees ar& calling us for 



refoials from various offices, and 
they want varied individuals to 
sponsor. Everyraie's really gotten 
into the spirit of things. We just 
saw a need. Churehes can only do 
so much." 

She estimated that in most cases 
assisted by die Connection, bodi 
parents may be working at 
minimum wage jobs, making only 
just enough to keep diem from 
qualifying for public assistaiK^. 

Odier functions of school scxM 
waters include interviewing and 
writing social histories fOT students 
being considered for special 
education services, investigating 
attendance patterns, verifying 
residence, providing counseling for 
students, equipping classroom 
teachers widi strategies with which 
to handle student behavior 
problems, uid getting dental and 
odier setvkes vdunteered for iw^y 

SQKtaltS. 




OvU Air Patrol Week 



\AqiNto ^acfc %mfir kfeyea QkmmiBrt msemiy Mr^ a prmtenadwi 
eMnlM S4 years (rf seivtce ty iie CM /Mr PaM » tfie nMon, sbte 
Md «%. mvm. fer tf« occaskm, *rom teft, were C*cmdwf, C^ K. 
t^^ CM( (flqtwkm cttmwKM »nI Capt. ^^mum S. Meiritt 
i^Mdrsn (yeatwis oiker). 



Power of the written word "^"^ 

Aim^rfwTOMfcst gra(te cte at C^ HMiy Q*^ &:hool cjci^ 

2^ reoen%ef^fed «*ior Bfc kite's "Htitvy C»»pl^ «J wetij «ii^ 

totfiePwyUbwy.sotfiatilttjdettcanieelfcaft ^^ 



NOTICE OF SERVICE OF 
PROCESS BY PUBLICATION 
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
COUNTY OF MECKLENBURG 

IN THE DISTRICT COURT 
BEFORE THE CLERK 95-SP- 
1683 

IN THE MATTER OF THE 

ADOPTION OF IAN HUNTER 

ELLIOTT, A MINOR CHILD 

, BORN TO BARBARA JEAN 

MCRAE ELLIOTT 

TO: MARK HAM- 
MOND/MARK HAMMOND 
AND/OR ALL PUTATIVE 
FATHERS OF IAN HUNTER EL- 
UOFF 

TAKE NOTICE diat a pleading 
seeking relief against you has 
been filed in the above entitled 
speciid proceeding. The nature of 
the reljef being sought is as 
follows: 

A hearing has been set before 
die Court at 10:00 a.m. on die 4di 
day of Jam^, 1996, or as soon 
Uiercafter as counsel can be heard 
for an order pursuant to N.C.G.S, 
48-6 allowing die adoption by 
petitioners KELVIN SEBRON 
BRYANT and PATRICE LAS- 
SITER BRYANT of IAN HUN- 
TER ELLIOTT, a minor child 
borti to BARBARA JEAN MC-, 
RAE ELLIOTT, to proceed 
without the consent of the 
putative fadier of the child. Said 
hearing will be held in die office 
of die Clerk of Superior Court, 
Civil Courts Building, Suite 101. 
800 E. 4th St., Charlotte. N.C. 
28202. 

You are required to make 
defense to such pleading not later 
than January 17th, 1996 and upon 
your failure to do so the parties 
seeking service against you will 
apply to die Court for the relief 
sought 

This die 29di day of November, 
1995. , 
W. E^vid niurman 
BUSH. THURMAN & Wilson, 
PA. 
N.C. Bar No. 11117 
801 East Trade Street 
Charlotte. North Carolina 
28202 
(704) 377-4164 

49-5 

PUBLIC NOTICE 1 
VIRGINL\: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERK'S OFFICE IN RE: 
DONNA MARIE WEBB. Plaintiff 

V. 

MICHAEL JEFFREY WEBB. 
Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION - 
CASE NO. 95-2657 

The object of diis suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii upon die grounds of 
one year separation. 

It is ORDERED diat Michael 
Jeffrey Webb appear and |Wotect 
his interest, on or befrae January 
29, 1996. which dale is no sooner 
diiui fifty days afta entry of diis 
onte of publication. 

And it is furdier ORDERED 
that diis order of ^blication be 
published once a w«k fw four 
successive weeks in Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this City 
prenrib^l by this court. 

November 28. 1995 

J. CURTIS raurr. clerk 

By Alesha Lindiey. Deputy 
Clerk 

4+12.^ 
QOaiMnmAQnPtgat 



mm 



^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^ 



^^H^^gmmmm^mmm^^^^ 



m^f^m 



□ esntlmiMinwnPmcS 



, N01KSQPPUBUC 

HBAIUNQ 
Vlfitaia: 

the niidir nMMlBg of the City 
Cmndl of die City of Vlr^iiia 
Bflu^ wUl bo hold in the Coiiiidl 
ChMBben of the City Hall 
Bntldlni, MoBicipal Center. 
MaceH Anne Stadon, VirgiiiU 
Beach. Virginia, on Tueiday, 
January 9. 1996 at 3:00 p.m., at 
which time the following 
qipllntton will be hevd: 

1. 

As CMinance to amend and 
roMddn Chq»er 33 of the City 
Code by adding a new Section 
33<n4.3, pertaining to 
idminiitntive qqnoval of cerudn 
encroaehmenu in the B-3A 
Pmbroke C^ntnl Buiinen Core 
diatrict More detailed infmnation 
ii available in the Planning 
Depmrnent. 

SUaPIVTSTflMVABrAMrP. 

PUNOQanantOTH 

1 

Appeal from Decisions of 
Adminiitntive Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the 
Subdivision Ordinance, 
Subdivision fw Elvin Ray & 
Ifester L. WaterfleU. Property is 
located at 2037 Munden Point 
RokLPUNQOBOROUOR 

PRINCESS ANNS BORniinH 

3. 

Appeal from Decisions of 
AdffiiiUstiBtive OfHcers in regard 
to certain elements of the 
Subdivision Ordinance, 
Subdivision for Michael k 
Patricia Nelson. Property is 
located at 2741 West Unding 
Road. PRINCESS ANNE 
B0R01X}R 

CHANGE OP 7QNINn 
DISTOICTCLASSIPTrATFnN- 

4. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Jas(m B. Cowwt for a Chan ge 
of Zoning Diilriet n«Mlflp«riftti 

from A-18 A{Mrtment District to 
R-SS Residential Single Family 
District on certain property 
located at the northwest 
intersection of Lincoln Avenue 
and Alabama Avenue. The 
jRopowd zoning chusification to 
R-SS is for single family 
residential land use on lots no 
less titan 3,000 square fset. The 
Comprehoisive pUm recmimends 
use of this pvcel for urban 
medium low density resi(kntial at 
dpMlties tiuu are compttible wUh 
use in a^ordance witii otiier Phm 
policies. Said parcel contains 
19.000 square feet. PRINCESS 
ANNEBOROUGE 
gBMPsvnTRBnaniir.H 

5. 

An (^dinance upon Applicatim 
of Vi^inia Beach Investment 
Company for a CondUtonal 
Chanye of Znninc Di«trict 
CUEiification from B-2 
Community Business District to 
Conditional A-24 Apartment 
Distfict on the west side of 
College Paiic Boulevard, 243 fMt 
north of Auburn Drive. The 
prqMsed zoning classification 
change to A'24 is for multifamily 
land use at a density no greater 
than 24 units per acre. The 
Cmnpr^ensive Plan recommends 
use of dtis pffcel for office use in 
accordance with other Plan 
policies. Said parcel conuilns 
11.13 acres. KEMPS VILLE 
BCHtOUOE 

mNDmONAL USE PERMIT: 

HAYSIDE BOROUGH 

& 

An OrdinanM upon plication 
of Ultimate Country Club, LLC, 

for a CnnditiQMl yw PBnnit for 

an indoor recreational facility (m 
Ute north side of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, east of Newtown 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
5600 Virginia Beach Boulevvd. 
#101, #102, #103. and contains 
3.5 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
f^pMwvnTPBniiniinH 

7. 

An Ordinance upon AppUcaticm 
of Kempsville Conservative 
S}^ttgogue f(v a f;ftii<tih<MMi Ti«ft 
Pmnit for a child care cMua bi a 
religious facility on certain 
|m^M»y located at die mntii^n 
terminus of Indian Lakes 
BoutevKd. Said pwcel is loctted 



OmMng 
tlMitoor 
to hope 



n ■ i^n^n^^n 



lie »>■«• aV HSM 

ens ran^ ^mr tn^v 




at 932 Indian Ltfna Booleved 
and contain! 3.65S lerai. 
KBMPSV&IBBOROUOH. ' 

PRINCESS ANNS BOROUOM 

8. 

An OnlhuHKe 1900 ^)|^feiA» 
of SMlUnga OU Company for a 

CoBdltlntial Um Pafmti fa, 

gaioitee pnmpi ta collection wldi 
a ctmvMilNice mm »d a ear 
wash on eeitida piq^erty loctfad 
at die aoutheait vsmet of I^ni 
Keck RMd ami Oramd Boodi 
Boulevard. Said parcel ctmtalns 
1.536 acres. PRINCBSS ANNB 
BOROUOE 

9. 

An CMinvice niwn >^)pUcation 
of Hiomas H. Wilkinson fw a 
riwHiUftMl Ugfl Parmit for hulk 

stca-age on the south side of 
Holland Road. Mat of Roaemont 
RMd. Said parcel is tocated at 
3365 Holluid ^owl and ctHMrina 
19 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUOH. 
BAYSIDB BOROUGH 

10. 

An Ordinance qxm ^lic^on 
of Jahn W. A Leslie T. Sunms for 
a Condltioial Uae Pmnlt fw a 
bed and Ineakfaat inn at die 
soudiwett eomw of church ^int 
Road and Meeting House Road. 
Said |»rcel is located at 4001 
Church Point R(»d and cmitatais 
2.7 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

STRBSTOQSURES; 

VIRGINIA BEACH BQRQUQH 

11. 

Aiq)lication of R. Lewis Boggs 
for the discontinuance, closure 
and abandonmrat of a portion of 
Baltic Avenue beginning at a 
point 300 feet soudi of Laddn 
Road and running in a 
soudiwesterly directitm along die 
eastern property line a distance of 
842.52 feet mme w less to die 
western boundvy of Holly Road. 
Said parcel is viriable in widdi 
and contains 1.131 acres. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUOR 

\% 

Application of R. Lewis Boggs 
for the discontinuance, closure 
and atandonment of die following 
parcels: 

Pareal 1-' Alleyway located 
between 29di Street and 30di 
Street beginning at the western 
boundary of Arctic Avmue and 
running in a westwly direction to 
the eastern boundary of Holly 
Road. 

EllfifiUi; Alleyway located 
140.15 feet nordi of 27di Sbeet 
beginning M die eaaton bmmdvy 
of Holly Ro«l and running in an 
eatterly direction a distance of 
49.^ feet. Said p»eets owtaln 
6086.45 square feet. VmGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

AMENDMENTS: 

13. 

Motion of die City of Virginia 
Beach to amend and reordain 
Sections 501 and 601 of die City 
Zoning C^dinance pertaining to 
use regulMlons fw flish ponds wd 
fish hatcheries hi the residoitial 
and apartment districts. More 
detailed infcH-maUon is available 
in die Planning Department. „ 

14. 

Motion of the City of Virginia 
Beach to amend and reonlain 
Article II, chapter 30 of die code 
of die City of Virginia Beach, 
Viiginia, potaining to b(»n>w pits. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Planning 
Department. 

15. 

Motion of tiie Qty of Virginia 
Beach to amend and reordain 
Sections 111 and 227 of die City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
borrow pits. More detailed 
inftmnation is available in die 
Planning Dqiartmmt. 

16. 

Motion of die City of Virginia 
Beach to amend Article 13 of die 
City Zoning Ordinance to permit 
certain light commercial uses as 
a conditional use within die 
Historic and Cultural district. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Planning 
Dqtartment 

17. 

Motion of die City of Virginia 
Beadi to araem! Article 2 of die 
City Zoning Oidinmice by ackiing 
Section 225.1 pmaining to bed 
and Imakfast inns. M«« detailed 
information is available in die 
Planning Depvttnent. 

18. 

Motion of dw City (rf Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Sections Ul nd 232,1 
of die City Zoning OiUnaiKe 
pertaining to bed wid bmdcfost 
inn. Mwe (tetailed informatim is 
available in the Planning 
DqwOmiL 

19. 

An OnUnnce iqKm ^>|4k»tton 
tf Hie Fi^ciacus Compwy, bic., 
for M MM^iiKnt » a 30 acre 
site of the Grem Roi Lnrf Use 
Plan, The proposal is to 
redesignate 7.5 acres from 
muttipto flunily to (^mmacM or 
multiple family. Hie lite is 
loc^sd on the north site of 
Princess Anne Road, 400 feet 
more or less east of S. 



Vllliiik Beach Sun. Rldav. Daeamhir 29. 199S 7 



Intependence Boulevard and 
contains 30 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
B(»KHX}K. 

All Interested parties are 
invited toatlwid. 
Rudi Hodges Smidi« CMC/AAB 
City Cleik 

51.3 
2tl^29 



iMlMIKuM 



VmOINIA: IN THE VIR0INIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLEiUrS OFFICE 

INRE: 

DraiaeLemire 

Piaintiff(s) 

V. R<^J. Lemire,Jr. 

Defftndant(i) 

ORDER OF PUBUCATION - 
CASBNO.Ch93-176S 

Hie object of diis suit is (for): 
Plitintiff to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from the 
Defondant on dw groimds of me 
year aqMntticn, 

It is ORDERED diat Roger J. 
LenUre, Jr. ^ip^ur ami protect his 
hitnest, on w befne January 30, 
1996 which dM is no sooner dun 
fifty days aft« wtry of dtis ord« 
of publicadon. 

And it is furdier ORDERED 
dwt tills order of publication be 
published once a week for four 
successive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun a newspaper of 
general circulation in diis City 
inescribed by diis court. 

December 4, 1995 

By J. CURTIS FRUIT, CLERK 

By Alisha Lindsey 

Deputy Clerk 

50-6 
4+1-5 



PuMIe NoMet 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Planning 
commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Wednesday, Juiuary 
10, 1996 at 12:00 Noon in die 
Council Chambers of die City 
Hall Building, Princess Anne 
Courthouse. Virginia Beach, 
Virgtaiia. A brl^ng session will 
be held at 9:00 a.m. in die City 
Manager's Conference Room, 
City HaU Building. PLANNING 
COMMISSION ACnON IS NOT 
FINAL DETERMINATION OF 
THE APPLICATION, BUT ONLY 
A RECOMMENDATION TO THE 
CITY COUNCIL AS THE 
VIEWPOINT OF THE 
PLANNING COMMISSION. 
FINAL DETERMINATION OF 
THE APPUCATION IS TO BE 
MADE BY Cmr CCHJNCIL AT 
A LATER DATE, AFTER 
PUBLIC NOTICE IN A 
NEWSPAPER HAVING 
GENERAL CIRCULATION 
WITHIN THE CITY. 

THOSE MEMBERS OF THE 
PUBLIC INTERESTED IN 
ATTENDING THE PUBLIC 
HEARING SHOULD BE 
ADVISED THAT, FOR 
REASONS THE PLANNING 
COMMISSION DEEMS 
APPROPRIATE, CERTAIN 
ITEMS ON THE AGENDA 
MAY BE HEARD OUT OF 
ORDER AND THAT IT 
SHOULD NOT BE ASSUMED 
THAT THE ORDER LISTED 
BELOW WILL BE EXACTLY 
FOLLOWED DURING THE 
PUBUC HEARING, 

The Aaff reviews of some fx all 
of the items on this agenda 
si^geat that cmain conditions be 
attached to approval by City 
Council. However, it should not 
be assumed diat dK»e conditions 
conititute all Uie conditions dial 
will ultimately be attached to die 
project. Staff Agencies may 
impose further conditions and 
requirements during 

adminismition of applicable city 
OTdinan^s. 

SfHDm?anNYARlANCBi 

1. 

Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the 
Subdivision Ordinance, 
Subdivision for Arnhold 
Maik^ing Savins, Inc. Property 
is located at 716 Woodstock 
Road. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGR 

Z 

Appeal from Decisions of 
Adminifirative OfH^rs in regard 
to certain elements of the 
Subdivision Ordinance, 
SubdivUm fix- Whitt G. S^nms, 
m. I^ttq)ffty is located on die eait 
side of Sydnor Mve, soudi of 
55th Street. LYNNHAVEN 
BORCXXSR 

rHAWBK OP ZQNIWr. 

msTBirT nASSiPirATinw. 

3. 

An CktUnance iqnn Af^k^m 
(rf Twin Stv Bnuprlan be, for a 
Chame of Zewiiiy DJatrici 
CUaiificaHoii from B-l 
N^^bOftood Burinns IMsirict te 
0-2 Office District on die 
souttoast side of N. Landing 
Ito^ nordi^t of Cout^«M 
Drive. The proposed zoning 
cla^Mato (^^e tt 0-2 is for 
office land use. The 
CofflpTOMmve ^ui le^MnnMite 



uae (tf dite iMBcd for rett^serv^ 
uae In a^KinfamM wldi odwr Plm 
pc^^M. &dd iweiria aie toeated 
at 33S0. 2387.'2388; 2393 k 2396 
Court niaa Drive ud ctrntirin 
4.889 acres. PRINCBSS ANNE 
BOROUOR 

4. 

An Ordinance t^wn A|^^c«l0B 
of Doris Vebna White-HaiTU for a 
ChanBB nf Zoning PUtriflt 



CUiilfleaHoii frOm A- 12 
Apartment Dli&ict to R-10 
RMidential Disblct on die soudi 
side of Old Virginia Beach Road, 
west of S. Biidneck R<»d. The 
proposed zoning classification 
tohange to R-10 is for single 
flunily resittential land use on lou 
no less dian 10^ square feet. 
The Comprehensive Plan 
recommends use of diis pucel fw 
subuiten low (tensity residential 
at (^sities thtt are compttible 
with single family use in 
accordance with other Plan 
polides. Said iwcel is located at 
1171 Old Virginia Beach Road 
uid contains 13,068 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BORCHJGH. 

5. 

An Ordimmce upon AppUcatitm 
of Taylor Farm Associates. LLC 

for ft Ch»nya of Totiipy nUtrii't 

aaanlflCltifin fo>m R-20 District 
te R-IO Residential District on 
die following parcels; 

Parcel 1: on die soutii side of 
London Bridge Road. 1460 feet 
more OT 1ms west (tf Pine View 
Avenue. 

Paicri 2: on die soudi side of 
London Bridge Road. 800 feet 
more or less west of Mne View 
Avenue. 

The proposed zoning 
classiflcation change to R-10 is 
for single family residential land 
use on l(Hs no less dian 10.000 
square feet. The Comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of this 
parcel for suburban low density 
residential at densities that are 
compatible widi single family uae 
in accordance widi odier Plan 
policies. Said parcel contains 6.5 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUOR 

& 

An Ordinance upm >^llcati(m 
of Taylor Farm Associttei. LLC 
for » ChMigfl Qf Zoning Diitritt 
CUigificfttion from AG-1 
Agricultural District te R-10 
Residential District on certain 
prqierty located 2650 feet more 
or less southwest of the 
intersection of London Bridge 
Road and Pine View Avenue. The 
proposed zoning classification 
change to R-10 is for single 
family residential land use m lots 
no less dun 10,000 square feet. 
The Comprehensive Plan 
recommends use of diis parcel for 
suburtian low density residential 
at densities tiiat are compatible 
with single family use in 
accordance with other Plan 
policies. Said parcel contains 11 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGR 

7. 

An Ordinance upon Applicatitm 
of Taylw Farm Associates, LLC 
for a Chftnea of Zoning District 

Clftsiificfttion from R-10 
Residential District to {PD-H2 
Planned Unit Development on 
Mrutin {ffoperty located 2670 feet 
more or less soudiwest of die 
intersection of London Bridge 
RokI and Pine View Avenue. The 
prqiosed zoning classification 
change te PD-H2 is for plumed 
develofmient The comprehensive 
Plan recommends use of this 
p«cel for suburban low density 
residential at densities that are 
compatible widi single family use 
in accordance with odier Plan 
polkies. Said parcel contains 17.5 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
B0R01K3R 
rnwniTiONAL yjLE 

PFigMIT; 

a 

An Ordhumce upon A|q>licati(m 
of Alan C. Williams for a 
ComHaonal U» Permit for an 
indoor recreational facility 
(battkig cage) on the wMt side of 
General Booth Boulevard, 900 
feet nuve or less ncmh of Dam 
Nedc RMd. Said parcel is located 
at 1489 (^«id Boodi Boulevard 
wd con^ns 8 aoes. nUNCESS 
ANNEBCmOlX3R 

9. 

An Ordinance t^on AppUcatim 
of P.C.S. Prim^o, L.P., for a 
rntwtirinnftl II«e PBrmit fiar ft 150- 

foot communications tower on 
prcq^erty located W feet more of 
less west of General Booth 
Boulevtfd, nordi of Dam N^^k 
Road. Said iwcel is kxated at 
1525 OeMnl Boodi Boulevard 
and conuins 5.490 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOR(^GR 

10. 

AnCMiMH^qxm ^qdk»tfon 
(tf ItepNs to^M^M, a Vi^inia 
Genial Partnership, for a 
rfflWHriOMl Tflfl Pfirmt! for an 
a utewi^t le iiB^ MteMlfhwMW 
w suttta popei^ w CT ted on ^m 
wwR sto {rf O^BM Boulewrd, 
%9.07 feet 8^ (tf Hanim Miad. 



Said parcel contains 22,391 
stmare foet. nUNCESS ANNE 
BOUHXm. 

n. 

^ (Mlnnce upon A^tettlon 
irf Eaitera MobUe Homes, Inc., 

far ft rfttiiHrioMl lliii P«nw» 9rm 

mobile IMMM adea on eartiln 
{Htqwrty loctted a Oe imtettt 
conm of 8. MUtaiy U^my nd 
Atexandria Avwne. Said pmel is 
located at 800 S. Military 
Highway and conuins 30,000 
square feet more or less. 
KEMPSVILLE BCffiOUGR 

12. 

An Ordinttice iqxm ^ifdication 
of P.C.S. Prim^o, L.P., fw a 

rnnHtrimiftl IlM Pfmit far . 1«V. 

foot communications tower on 
certain property located on die 
east side of Newtown Road, smidi 
of Lake Edward Drive, Said 
parcel is located at 500 Newtown 
Road, and contains 8.169 aa«s. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

13. 

An Ordinance uptm Application 
of BJ's Whotesale Club for a 
Conditionftl Use Permit for die 

relocation of an existing 
autemobile service (tire bay) on 
die north side of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, west of Rosemont 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
3712 Virginia Beach Boulevard 
and conteins 10.028 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGR 
AMRNPMRNT.<ii 

14. 

Motion of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Section 402 of die City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining te 
dimeiiiional requirements in die 
AG-1 and AG- 12 Agricultural 
Districts. More detailed 
information is available in die 
Planning Dej»ranenL 

rnMMissinN on in/n/oa. 

15. 

An Ordinance upon Application 
of Armada/Hoffler Retail 
Development Company, L.L.C., 
for a Conditionftl Chftnye nf 
Zoning Diitrict Clftaaificatinn 

from I-l Light Industriial District 
to B-2 Community Business 
District on certein property 
located 150 feet more or less 
south of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, west of Great Neck 
Road. The proposed zoning 
classification change te B-2 is f« 
commercial land use. The 
Compehensive Plan recommends 
use of diis parcel fa* industrial 
use in accordance widi odier Han 
policies. Said propwty is located 
at 2437 Virginia Beach Boulevard 
and 120 Parker Laiw and ctmtalns 
16.686 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUOR 

nRPggMEn BY WAWWINO 

16. 

An Oniinuice iqxm Application 
of Alex A 0. Pete Kotvides fw a 
ChftHfa of Zoniny Diitrict 

Classification from 0-2 Office 
District to B-2 community 
Buriitess District at dw soudiwest 
corner of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and Fair Meadows 
Road. The proposed zoning 
classification to B-2 Is for 
commercial land use. The 
Compfehensive Plan recommends 
use of this parcel Ux suburban 
medium density residential at 
densities that are compatible widi 
single family use in acccmlance 
widi odier Plan policies. Said 
propwty la located on Lots 137, 
138 A 139 Fair Meadows and 
contains 22,498.74 square feet. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGR 

17. 

An Ordinance upon Ap|rilcation 
of Target for a Conditional 

ChMgfi of Zoning giitriti 

Clasiification from R-5D 
Residential Duplex Diatrict te 
Conditional B-2 community 
Business District at die swdieast 
coner of Princess Anne Road and 
Lynnhaven Parkway. The 
proposed ztming classlficatiwi 
change to B-2 is for general 
commercial land use. The 
CompeNmnve Han rea)mm«ids 
use of tills iNUfcel few suburban 
high density residential at 
(tensittea ditt «e ompatible widi 
single family use in i^onlance 
with other Plan policies. Said 
parcel contains 19 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUOH. 

18. 

An Qr#BaiM» iqwn i^^riica^m 
of P.C.S. PrimeCo, L.P. fw a 

rnndiriMMl IlM I»Miiitt far « 19S. 

foot ixmunnnlaMfoin iow« on die 
east side of Bd^ Road, 200 fl^ 
more <tf teas nosdi (tf Nocdinqittxi 
Boulevard. Sitid i»n^l cmiialni 
1.21 acres. BAYSITO BOROKSR 

19. 

Application of Ontario 
Development, Inc., for the 
recMsideratioa of cmditions 
placed M tto ^^dto^on Im' a 
change of zoning firm R-6 
Realdential Disttict u> B-2 
Community Bu^ms IM^lct on 
Much M, 1994. Propwty is 
located 470 feet east of 
Keiqwville Road. 260 foet soBtt 



of IndliD River Road. 
KEMPSVELS BOROUOR 

RBQULAgAQmiDA. 

OONDrnONALUSBraHMtT. 

20. 

An Onttance q^ i^q^Ucttkn 
of Mtmit Btthel Bi«^ eburdi 

chur^ OB tte eM ride of bOn 
Rlvw Road, north of %%mfi 
Lake Lane, Slid pncti la located 
at 4636 Indian River Road and 
contains 4.9 acres. KBMPSVOXB 
B^tOUGR 

MQPmCATTQN TO TANn 
USB PLAN! 
2L 

plication of Taylor Farm 
Associatea, UJZ fiw modiftoition 
to dw Lan4 Use Plan for T.C.C. 
Develq)ment Onporation which 
was gruitod on January 14, 1985. 
Pnqiwty is located on London 
Bridge Road west of Pine View 
Avenue. Said parcel contains 300 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGR 

MQDIPirATION n p 

CQNPmONS; 

22. 

Application of die Virginia 
Beach Development Audiimty fw 

a modiflcation of conditions 
attMhed to die rezonings which 
were granted on June 13, 1988, 
August 14. 1989, November 9, 
1993 and November 12. 1994. 
Said parcels are located on die 
soudi side of Dam Neck Road, 
west of General Boodi Boulevud 
(Corporate Landing) and contain 
337 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGR 

AMBNDMSNTS 

23. 

Motion of tiw City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend uid 
reordain Section 206 of tiw City 
Zoning Oridinance pertuning to 
minium lot area for public uid 
IMlvate pump stations, water tenks 
and other unmanned utility 
facilities. More detailed 
information is available in tiie 
Planning Department. 

24. 

Motion of tiie City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Section 106 (c) of tiie 
City Zoning Ordiniance potaining 
to fees for Board of Zoning 
appeals variances. More detailed 
information is available in die 
Planning Dquuimmt. 

All interested parties are 
invited to attend. 

Robert J. Scott 

Planning Director 

If you are {Aj^caOy disabled w 
visually impaired and need 
assistance at diis meeting, please 
call tiw CITY CLERK'S OFFICE 
at 427-4303. 

Hearing impaired, call: TDD 
only at 427-4305. (TDD - 
Telephonic Device Ikx die Deaf). 

51-4 
2tl2-29 



PuWIe None* 



VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH CIRCUIT COURT 
CLERKS CHTIOB IN RE: 

An^ I. Questel Plalniff 

V. Dlaiw L. Questd Defendant 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION - 
CASE NO. CH9f -3254 

The object of diis suit is for 
Andre J. Questel to obtain a 
(Uvorce a >^ido mattimonii from 
Diane L. Questel, on dw groumls 
of a (me year sqwiatian. 

It is ORDERED diat Diane L. 
Questel appear and protect her 
interest, on or befwe Feteuary 7, 
1996 which date is no sooiwr dian 
fifty days after entry of dUs onter 
of publication. 

And it is furdier ORDERED dwt 
this order of publication be 
published once a wedc Ust four 
successive wedcs in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
genial circulation in tiiis City 
prescribed by diis court 

December 11, 1995 

J, CURTIS FRUrr. CXERK 

By AUshia Undsey 

DqiutyCteric 

51-3 
4tl-12 



PuMle Noiic* 



Take ik>Aw ditt on 12^0^5, at 
10:00 A.M. at the premises of 
4747 Shore Dr. Va. Beach. Va. die 
undersigned will sell at Public 
Auction, for cnh, res^ving unto 
iaetf dw right to iwl, dw foltowing 
^icle. 1987 Cadillac Deville 
Serial « 1G6CD5182H4246204. 

52-1 
IT 12-29 



Pubite NoUct 



Take notia dutt on 12/30/95, at 
10:00 A.M. at die ^emiMs of 
4747 Shore Dr. Va. Beach. Va. Ae 
unda'signed will sell at Public 
Awtim, for cash, re^rving mto 
i&^ Ike r^t to Ud, dw foOowi^ 
vehkito. 1^ Ctevrotet S-10 ^ 
Up Serial # 

10CBS14E^2%4674. 

52-2 
IT 12-29 



^nRnppppmiV9n«vii<wv^vv^p^w^^^^ 



VP^W 



g ykmm Beadi Sim. Riday. Decwnber 29. 1995 



KK 



Classifieds 



CAU. TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



AUTOS / JUNK • WANTED 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

Itime 
2 times 
4 times 



20 Words 
or lass 

$ 7.50 
$ 13.50 
$ 22.50 



words 

.35 

.70 

1.40 



Run your Classified Ad fourtimes for only $22.50. You can cancel 
your ad at any time. 

An Classified Ads run in tttrae newspapers (The Virginia Beach Sun, The Chesap- 
eake Post and The (Hxtsmoutf) Times). No additional diarge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 



20 words 



Run my ad for . 
Payment Is erwiosed $ 



Issues. 



Make check payable to Byerty PvUicattona 
MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23327 

Name 

Address 

City 



FOR HELP with your Classified Ad. please call 547-4571 . 

COMBNATION RATE: Bun «* wm pMontf id In wy otiw Bywiy PuWIealloni namp^wr to in 
•ddMSMl S3 on* Una. fS MO Umn, S7 law dnai. NMnpwwi in FrcnUln. Birpai*, UwwiMvM*, 
Dhwiddi* «Ki Pawiburg. Call M7-457t l» Mai*. * 



AIRUNE TICKETS 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



One way, anytime, anywhere, in 
U.S. $300. Roundtrip no advance' 
for $4». CeM 1-800-925-4704 

1/5 



Mormons, JW's, Masonry, New 
Age; What do they really believe? 
For free t)ooklet call Cornerstone 
Ministries at 1-868-0793. 1/5 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



SPANISH SPEAKERS 

People with contacts in Latin 
Amertea wanted to cash in on 
Internirtional Markets. Call 499- 
4133. 1A/96 

■■■■- i ■--— ^ ■ 

$ SAVE $ SLASH YOUR 
GIK>C£RY BILLS BY UP TO 50%. 

CALL FOR DETAILS: 804-340- 
5234. 

SELECTIVE SIIKILES DANCE 
EVERY MONDAY! 

Detir^ servtees are not for usi 
Bi(Kiest singles party in Tidewater 
for the over 28 career singles. 
7:00 til mkJnight. Dress casuall Tell 
a single friend I Mitty's, Omni 
Nmvport News Hotel, $5. l-64/Exit 
2S8-A. 804-249-5452, Lila. 
2/16 

"DONATE"CARS" 

••BOATS"RVS" 

"TRUCKS" 

Jewish Heritage for the Blind. Tax 

dedudWe. PromfM pid(-up. 

NEED l«DT RUN. 

1-800-2-DONATE 

1-800-236-6283 



- DONT DRMK THE WATER" 

Counter top water treatment 
sy^em. Filters out Chlorine, lead 
ar^l many other a}mm0n water 
pollutants up to 10,000 gallons. 
NTL tested. 99% reduction 
Guaranteed. Easy to install. 
ChMtmas specif 199.95 indudes 
sh^ng and handling. Please 
••nd chedt or money order to 
Demon P.O. Box 62382 Va 
Be«h, Va 23466 or cell 579- 
14S2, for free home demo. 

12/29 



ACCESSORIES 

Turkish Rug. 7x10, - $1TO 

Fk)cata Greek Rug, 4x6, $215 

Desk - $12, Rattan wall shelf-$25 

Banell chair- $25. 482-4771 

Bassett dining room set- China 
Cabinet, Table good condition. 
Table can be round or oval. $400 
or best offer- 804-^7-71 83 1 /5 

GoM/ silver Plating Machine 
all supplies and training $895. 
Call 704-888-2481. 12/29 



Bassinet white only 2 1/2 months 
$30. Call Julie work 547-4571 
home 39Q-09Q2, tin 



Pine Thomasville dinning room 
table and chairs, 2 arm chairs, all 
chairs with padding plus 2 extra 
leaves for table. $1000 or best 
offer. 482-1428. tfn 



ANTIQUES / COLLECTIBLES 



ANTIQUES- 10,000 SQUARE FT. 

of artglass, furniture, paintings, 

clocks, much morel 

Open 10-5 

1804 Granby St. 

622-M05 dir. 

1/12 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



Ferrari- Insured. 

$3,000 dollar stereo, telephone, 
radar. 17,000 miles, excellent 
condithin. 46,000. Bob 804-295- 
8040. 



Service Directory 



AUTOSERVK^ 



CLEANING / JANITOnAL SVC 



BAUMNNTOMNG 

ftt bed sennn $30 

Dqw5««KS. 

E^tafs, beap ar 578-9581 

,kmk etn txuslHi $SO&(p. 



Clewiing- Prtrte^oi^ dearang, A 
reasonable ratee, nMwa out 
windows. Ctf Ete 484-4338. 

12/29 



1/5 



CHILD CARE 



(MEAT m»<% MKA- ChH me 

in i^f tome, aH i^pae, R4-ttM. 
Part-time. Meeto t eni^s 
pfwided. iTerty of s^mMm, MIf 
supervwed. Llcewaed/ bi^ved. 
f^n-sm^wr. Qua% ^m m a 
fw% hMM. Crii afqfH^ 4ie- 
^m m 51»»MS7. 



Disc jsdMys availMrie for 
Christmas A New ]^ws prnim. 
vMdding n mf Umm arte. Sluing 
at $1^ ewNeet Roae er Dmrt at 
857-7749. Gospel groups 
tar Mmd ^iws. Bamte 



$$ CASH PAID $$ 

For vehfcles, 1980 and up. with 
bad engines, bad transmissions or 
wrecked. Some exceptions. Call 
456-0057. 1^ 

AAA-1 AUTO JUNK 

Junked or wrecked call for top 
prices. Ihr. pickup. 545-6002. 



Ain-OS ACCEPTED 

any make, yaar or condition 

TOP $$$ 

FAST FREE TOWINGI 

545-2821 

^/5 



JUNK CARS 

Peck Recycling now buying whole 
cars at Elm Ave. Ports. VA. Call 
399-4075 for info. 1/5 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



PERSON WANTED- to own and 
Operate retail candy shop in 
Virginia Beach area. For 
information call Mrs. Burden's 
Gourmet Candy Company, Dallas, 
TX (214) 991-8239. 12/29 

Steel building business is 
booming II National Manufacturer 
is qualifying dealers in select open 
markets. Big profits on sales and/ 
or construction. Call (303) 759- 
3200, ext. 2300. 



Executive Search- A well 
established health care company 
opens new division poised in the 
Preventive Health Care Market. 
Seeking several individuals to 
head up expansion in Tidewater 
area. For information send resume 
to: Kim Murphy, Personnel, 1719 
Birch Trail Circle, Suite E, 
Chesapeake, Va. 23320. 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS • 
RETAIL 

Mid-sized, drums and percussnn 
specialty store considering investor 
and/or co-owner lor expansion. 
Excellent growth potential 426- 
2753. 12«9 



CLASSES /SCHOOLS 



BARMASTERS OF VA BEACH 
Bartending scNiol 

1141 Independence Blvd. 1-2 wks 
day / evening classes Job/ place- 
ment assistance. Lowest tuitton in 
area. For Free Class / 464-0500. 

1/12 



COINS / STAMPS / HOBBIES 



BUY SELL COINS - GoM & Silver 
items. Military items & other 
collectibles. Collectors Choice, 
5441 Va. Beach Blvd. 497-5950. 

1/12 



ENTERTAINMENT 



CLUB ESCORT 

Beautiful girls for all o<x:asions 

providing alternative entertainment 

for the definitive male. 

548-9697 

Hiring men and women. 

1^ 

ALL STARZ ENTERTAINIffiNT 

High class ladies for private 
parties, dancing, dining, massage 
and morel DON'T HESITATE 
CALL FOR THE BEST. 499-0865 
12/15 

AFTER 6 437-0602 

MALE/FEMALE MODELS PER- 
FORMING THE HOTTEST SHOW 
YOU'VE EVER SEENIII ALSO 
CAPTIVATING LINGERIE SHOWS 
AND ESCORTS NOW 
AVAIUBLEIII CLUBS/ PRIVATE 
PARTIES. DON'T CALL THE 
REST- WE'VE GOT THE BESTI 

1/12 



FARM /LAND /TIMBER 



SS* acre f wm for sale In 

Jerusatom District. Southwnpton 

CourMy, Virginia, on Untty Road 

and Mteton Church Road. If 

intei^ed, cdl {¥>*) ^2-5133. 

m 



Fli^1IIK>0D/ FUELS 



Firewood- K% oid( cut. sfM $ 
(telverMl. 1 ton pidujp. C^l 804- 
8«>-»M8. 1^ 



HELPWANTB) 



SECUMTY - Armed effieert, tUie 
mistered, full and part time 
WHl^ito. C^l %2-%<8. 12^ 



HELP WANTED 



HEALTH & WEALTH 

Billions will be made in the health 
industry in 1996. International 
health and fitness company seeks 
5 career minded individuals for 
(Tidewater expansion. Call 468- 
6975. 1« 

THE PERFECT JOB 

$400 a week full time, 

several people needed to do 

promotional work in the 

exciting photograph fieh). 

No experience ne<»ssary. 

We train. Call 423-8506 

1/S 

NEWSPAPER 
EDITOR/REPORTER 

Immediate position available at 
Dinwiddle Monitor, a weekly 
community newspaper near 
Petersburg. Journalism degree 
required, exper. preferred, 
knowledge of AP style a plus. 
Competith/e starting salary, gas 
allowance. Relocation to 
community required. Serious 
inquiries only. Send resume to Mr. 
Brown, P.O. Box 497. Franklin, VA 
23851. 1-5 

ROOFERS 

Experienced. 422-2631 ext. 401, 
anytime. 12/29 

Company DrKrere Wanted 

How wouki you like a job where 
you operate your own truck as if 
you w^ra an owner-operator but 
without truck payments, repairs, 
insurance, permits, road use taxes 
or any of the usual problems trying 
to exist as an owner-operator in 
today's industry. What if your truck 
was a 199 full dress, conventional, 
KW walk-in sleeper alls the bells 
and whistles. 25 cents a mile, 
percent of profits, health 
insurance, 401 K, home several 
times a week and weekends. 
Good NVR, 2 years verifiable over 
the road experience. Call Ope 1- 
800-903-2621. 1/12 



Owner Operators Wanted 
Large intermodel carrier needs 5 
professional for over the road 
operatton. 

Home weekends • Paid weekly • 
No escrow • No unfoading • one 
on one dispatch 

2200 - 2800 miles weekly. We 
require 25 years of age or older, 2 
years over the road experience, 
and a good NVR. Call Joe 1 -800- 
903-2621. 1/12 

THE PERFECT JOB 
Set your own hours fuU/ part time. 
For unique home service 
company. Direct sales/ real estate 
experience a plus. Call HSA 497- 
1040. 1/5 

TRAIN TO BE AVIATION 
MECHANIC IN POMPANO BEACH 
FL FOR JANUARY 29TH CLASS, 
60 WEEKS, TRAINING, 
FINANCIAL AID AND HOUSiNO 
AVAiUBLE. JOB PLACEMENT 
ASSISTANCE 1-800-545-7M2. 
12/29 

COMMUNICATIONS-Natbnal firm, 
expanding in Tidewater area. 
Seeking sharp, highly motivated 
indlvkjuals with ^>od public skills. 
Call 368-0848. 

COLLECTORS 

For law firm 

Experierwe required. 

Part-time evenings and Saturdays 

Call Mrs. Stampe 490-6292. 



TELEPHONE SALES 

Established business In Great 
Bridge area of Chesapeake is 
seeking full-time or part-time 
telephone solicitors. Experience 
prefered, but not necessary. You 
must have good spelling ability, 
legible handwriting and an 
intelligent willingness to learn. 
Most important you must enjoy 
dealing with the public by 
telephone . You should live in or 
near the Great Brkjge area. Salary 
is based on hours worked. If 
Interested, pie^e write fuliy, giving 
your quallfteattens to: Telephone 
Solicitor. P.O. box 1327, 
Chesi^Midte. Va. ^327. 



MYSTERY SHOPPERS 

needed Immediately. Virginia 
B»ma\. (M 1-K)0-a».lKK). 

12^9 



HOMES /SALE 



QREENBHIER- Large house, 
fenced yard, double gari^je, 3 
bedroom 2 bath, den with 
fireplace, small offk^. $7(M) per 
month, now available 482-3771 
1/19 

Immaculate 2BR/ 3BR ranch, 

Rent with optk>n, avalMe Feb. 

Cfose to naval shij^ard 

Large eat In kitchen/ atmai 

air/heat , ceiling fans, fenced yard 

attached garjqe, 8x11 ston^ja 

shed. Too miK^h to list- must seel 

Help with closing cost available. 

Call Kevin (owner) 484-5933 

1/5 

FORECLOSURE SALE. 3 
bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, 1513 
McDaniel st. Portsmouth 
$75,000.00. ALL OFFERS 
CONSIDERED, Low Down Low 
Payment Financing, 

METROPOLITAN MORTGAGE, 
1600-541-0828 EXT 515, ASK 
FOR BOB GUNNING. 1/5 



ALL CLOSING COST PAID 

on any VA/HUD owned home, vet 
or non-vet. Bobby Scott & 
Associates Real Estate 490-7826. 



LOANS /MORTGAGES 



ATTENTKm HOME OWNERS! 

It's time to get your finances in 
order. ONCE & FOR ALL. NO UP- 
FRONT FEES nor equity in home 
necessary. CALL US NOW. 24/hr. 
day 7 days a week for immediate 
service. HOME EQUITY 
MORTGAGE INC. 800-884-4365 

1/12 

HOME OWNERS 

We have the best 

rates In town. 

All credit considered. 

Ist, 2nd, 3rd Mortgages. 

Very Low Payments 

ConsolkJate Bills. 

No Equity? 

Bankruptcy OKI 

Call 1-800-664-6779 

Bill or Lews 

INFINITY FUNDING CORP. 

^m 

FAST CASH 
for HOMEOWNERS 

All credit considered. 
1st, 2nd, 3rd Mortgages. Low 
rates. Low payments. 
Consolkiate bills. 

No Equity? 

Bankruptcy OK. 

Call 1-800-913-9816 

Jeff Rusch 

UNITED SOUTHERN MORTGAGE 

1/5 



LOST /STRAYED 



CAT- OLD GREAT NECK RD. 
AREA -$500 REWARD 

"ptekett" Black, whtte paws, white 
on face and stomach, male, 
neutered, declawed, shorthaired. 
No collar. Lost 8/6. Call Roy or 
Deborah. 340-7484 or 651-6513 
or 650-1 1 24 or 855-3071 . 1 /5 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CURRITUCK COUNTY- 5 chok» 
buikling tots. Some wooded. Near 
the Cotton Gin at Jarvisburg. 
Priced to sell $18,500 ea. Bill 
Robbins 1-919-453-2126 d^s 1- 
919-453-6950 eves. 12/29 



MASSAGE 



ABSOLUTELY DIVINE 

Ther^wutk; massage now 
availaUe at super convenient 

Chesapeake tocatnni 

Professtonal, ABMP CertMied. 

GIFTCERTFICATESI 

Call Paula 437-0921 or 6»-7838 

pager. 

MASSAGE BY TMJ 

Carpal Tunnel, heedi^hes, back 
pains, whiplash, arthrkis, hollas, 
chronic pains, fatigue, hip/ lag 
protMems. Aaron 428-69^, EmHy 
747-^65. 12«9 



MiSC FOR SALE 



ENFORCER. OverNlte Roach 
Spray or OverNlte Pest Control 
Concentrate. Makes up to 2 
galkHw for faM ami tanthig nMdi 
control. GUARANT^I Avalatsla 
tf DAILS HOME CENTER AND 
ROMIES HCM/IE (%NTER. 




MOBILE HOMES /RENT 



Gates NC- 3 bedroom/ 2 bath. 
Excellent condition, Immediate 
occupancy, Hwy 13 S. 5 min/ VA 
line lot rent/ water Included. 
AvBllablo nowl Call 1-919-357- 
0310. 1/19 



IMOBILE HOMES /SALE 



2 Bedroom Furnlehsd 
Portsmouth area $ 3.000 cash or 
$ 1,(XK) and $ 200 for 12 months , 
12 wide. Call 485-3712 or 804- 
262-M04. 12/22 

Big beautiful doublewide. 

Only 1200 down. 

Only $285 per month. 

Only one to sell. 

Call 804-249-0764 

sp 36k apr 9.7 tim 300 

Oakwo<xf Homes. 1/5 



Mobile Home Finance Co. 

Has money to lend 

No points. No closing cost. 

$799 down will guarantee you a 

home . Ist. Time Buyer Program. 

Call 804-249-0764. 

Oakwood Homes 1/5 

1995 3 BR Repo 

Assume pmts. of only $215. 

And move In today. 

Call 804-249-0764. 

sp 18.5k tim 180 dp 1000 apr 

1 1 .0. Oakwood Homes. 1 /5 



MOBILE HOME SITES 



COLONIAL RUN MOBILE HOME 
PARK • Vacant spaces- Rents av- 
eraging $237 - $252 monthly. 
Sites available now. 804-464- 
0770. 



MOTORCYCLES 



WEBUYUSEDHARLEYSf! 

SOUTHSIDE HARLEY DAVIDSON 
499-8964. 

1^ 

HARLEYS WANTEDIII 
Cash for your HARLEYS todayl 
Top dollar paid for good clean 
HARLEYS. take the hassle out of 
selling your HARLEY. I will come 
to you. Cash paid for info on 
HARLEYS for sale. Call CHAD at 
Hampton Ftoads Harley- Davklson, 
804-857-6549. and Peninsula 
804-245-5221. Mon-Fri. 9-7, Sat 
9-5. Va. Dir. 

CASH 

TOP DOLUR PAID 

For motorcycles, water craft ATVs 

& 4 wheelers. Will ptok up at your 

tocatton. Call anytime. Leave 

message if no answer. 

SRS Motor Sports 

910-272-9827 

1993 Honda Gold Wing/As- 
pencade. Black. 8629 original 
miles. $11,000 negotiable. Call 
429-9132 before 9 pm. tfnst 



MUSKiAL 



Dnjm Kit- Pearl, 6 pieces $900 

cymbals/ snare/ stands/ cases 

home 804-255-4919 

wori< 436-2577 

1/5 



OFFICE SUPPLIES 



6*6" Desk partlttons 
Only 2 yeare oW- ai»olutely 

excellent conditton 
Must go within 2 weeks! 

Call 547-7333 



1« 



PERSONALS 



ADOPTION 

I am an adorable 3 year oM 
looking for a newbom brother or 
sister to share my foving parents 
and beautiful home. Twins 
wetoome. Please <M Bob & Lisa 
anytime 1-800-619-2186. 1^ 



ADOPTION 

Young h^i^ly married oouFrie who 
cannot have chiWren wishes to 
adopt baby. WILL SHARE 
PHOTOS. LETTERS AS CHILD 
GROWS, IP DiWRW. Will pay 
msdic^, ^al e}q>enses. Miriam 
and J^ 1-800-484-3253 code 
3103. 1/5 



Happily m«fiad co^Ne, unaUe fo 
have diMdran. wishes to ado|M 
newbvn. A h^f^ home iMi hits 
of love and seewrBy fmmiami, WM 
fMV LegaV Medk^ immisii. 
^Tl I -T "^ **"' — II mfcii jgj 






ii/n 



1^^^^^ 



Virginia Btach Sun. Friday. Decgnbo- 29. 1995 9 



Classifieds 



CALL TODAY 

TO PLACE YOUR AD IN 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 

547-4571 



PERSONALS 



PETS 



ADOPTION 

Wa know you are fusd with a 
difficult choics. Lfit US halp you 
find a toving, caring horn* for your 
baby. WE ARE EASY TO TALK 
TO. Plaata call FRIENDS IN 
ADOPTION 1-800-982-367t. 1/S 

MEET " 

NEW PEOPLE 

THE FUN WAY 

TODAY! 

1-900-255-2700 EXT. 7825 

$2.99 min. 

Mufit be 18yrs. 

Toucfi-tone phone required 

Serv-u {619)-645-8434). * 



AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD 
PUPPIES AVAILABLE 12/23, 
$400 each. AFRICAN OSTRICH 
$500/each. SOUTH AMERICAN 
OSTRICH $100/each. 
AUSTRALIAN OSTRICH $50/each 
Kan - 919-491-2376. 60 mllea 
south of Norfolk. 1^ 

Looking for a flea-tick shampoo 
that kills fleas, monthly flea 
programs can't . Ask' INDUSTRIAL 
HARDWARE 544-2232 about 
HAPPY JACK PARACIDE 
shampoo. Contains no pyrathrlnsi 



1/12 



PETS SUPPLIES 



Adopt: Devoted caring couple 
wishes to give an infant a loving 
home. We guarantee a bright and 
happy future. Legal / Medical 
paid. Please call Dentse & Rocco 
1-800-428-1901. 12/29 

SINGLE GIRLS & GUYS 
k)oklng for love & romance? Call 
your personal dateline to meet 
your matchi 1-900-255-2525. Ext 
8157. $2.99/ min 18 + Tch-Tn Fon 
Req. SERV U 619-645-8434. 

12/29 

Mitch Mtakar Network 
Share Thia Holiday SMton Call 
1 •900-388-7879 ext 12. One 

simple phone call, and see for 
yourself just how easy H can be. 
HonettI CALL TODAY $2.49/ 
min, 18 yrs + HTP Va. Bch. Va. 
804-430-DATE (3283) 2/9 

Looking for someone aboard the 
USS Liberty In the 60's. Please 
write to P.O. BOX 1327 
Chesapeake, Va 23320 Attn: USS 
Liberty. My father Is looking for 
shipmates. tfn 

24 year old mother of 3 seeking a 
friend to go out and have fun with 
NO HANKY PANKYI Interest are: 
singing, Karaoke, Country & 
Classic rock, comedy clubs, danc- 
ing, etc... Looks & age unlmpor- 
tantl Serious Inquires only. 
Let's be friendsl Write: P.O. Box 
1327 (A-1) Chesapeake, Va. 
23327. ^ ■ ' ^ 



AC^UARHJM 

'iTO galkins, oak trimmed in large 
oak room divider. Magnum, 
punps, all accessories, gravel & 
coral. $1,000. 471-4688. 1« 



POSITIONS WANTED 



RAY'S RESIDENTIAL 

HOMECARE 

Family owned & operated It now 
accefrtlng appllcattona for the 
elderly with limited disabllltlea. 
Lots of TLC and a home 
atmosphere. S97-6084 or 397- 
9214. 1/19 



REAL ESTATE 



HISTORIC PORT NORFOLK- 

Newly remodeled 1 bedroom apt. 
Formal dining room. $499 per 
month, discounted rent Includes 
utilities, Immediate occupancy 1* 
423-725-5988. 1/5 

Trustee must sell- Remodeled 
Triplex. Great cash ftow. Reduced 
to 64,900 or best offer 1-423-725- 
5988. m 



ROOMS FOR RENT 



THOMAS NELSON HOTEL 

Phone, color TV, dally maid 
service. Daily $21 + tax, also 
weekly rates 622-4341, Qranby 
St., Downtown Norfolk. 12/29 



PETS 



y 



ADiO / STEREO EQUIPMENT 



Free- 4 month old Qolden 
Retriever mix puppy, female, very 
friendly. Good with kids. To good 
home only. Call 399-7907. tfn 



SANYO SYSTEMS 6S7 

Includes turn table, amp 

graphic equalizer, tuner 

and cassette deck 

(120 watts) $ 2 speidtsrs. $200 

Call 428-0397 







Pamper Your Pet 

M breed professional Pet Grooming 
Nm in Chesapeake 

loaiied in CompaniM Animal 

Veterninary Hotpital 

209 Mt.Plmant Raul 



17 Ytan Experlena 
Cali for appolntmmt 



r 
I 



it" 



$5.00 off 

U.' mM/" f\r'r'et\ it bath or hair At r, 

■« 546-9668 ci^^'^iL'^^.^jii 
Jit, « i:- tj «• ^ #} «• d- %« «• ««' 




HELP 

and HOPfe 





1-W%471T 



TICKETS 



WANTED TO BUY 



GREAT PHANTOM TICKETSII 
Rear dress circle. Indivklual ticketo 
$46.50 with packages available 
Dec. 15th, 16th, 22nd, 23rd, 29th 
and 30th. Also New years eve 
padcages available. 393-2573 ext. 
7Wi. HolMay Inn Portsmouth. 



TOWN HOMES /RENT 



OM electronk: parts, tubes. Big oU 
speakers, tube HIFI amps. Old 
electronic books, catalogs. Call 
703-856-8277. 12/29 

•AQUTARS WANTEDS* , 

'Cash paid for used acoustic or 
electric guitars and amps. 595- 
4663. 1/5 




ELEGANT TOWN HOUSE 
Near Fredertek & Deep Creek in 
Portsmouth, just off 1-264. 
RreplwM, 2 bedroom, 1 1/2 baths, 
appliances Included. Immaculate 
condition. $450.00 monthly. 
Lease and security deposit. 
Owner. Call 804-826-6602. 



TRAVEL 



SKI SNOW SHOE 

West Virginia. 1 & 2 bedroom 
units, sleeps 4-8. Whistle punk, 
Snowcrest, Powderldge, Fireplace, 
cable, VCR, Jacuzzi, owner rates. 
Call Linda 803-277-7449. fax 803- 
299-1323. 1/S 

BAHAMA CRUISE 

5 days / 4 nights 

UNDERBOOKEDI MUST SELLI 

$279 / couplel LIMITED TICKETSI 

1-800-935-9999 EXT. 6423 

Monday through Saturday 

9am- 10pm 

1/5 



UNEXPLAINED 



Psychic tells you things 
you may not even want 
, to know?? 
1-900-255-0300 Ext. 2713 

$3.99 per min. 

Must be 18 yrs. 

Touch-tone 

Serv-U (619) 645 8434 



TRUCKS FOR SALE 



INSTRUCTION 



%^ LEARN TO DRIVE 
TRACTOR-TRAILER 

•No Experience needed 
•DOT Certification. 
•Full or part-time 
training 

•Placement Dept. 
•Financing Available 
•CDL Training 

ALLIANCE 

TRACTOR-TRAILER 
TRAINING CENTERS 



1950 Ford Pickup 

Backwoods handyman 

Speciall Has 2 motors 

$350 ( does not run) 

Call 479-9863 after 1 pm 

Monday-Friday 1 pm to 7 pm 

Saturday li Sunday. 

8T FORD EXPLORER XLT 
Loaded, am/tm cassette stereo, 
power windows & door locks, tilt 
wheel, cruise control, sun/moon 
roof. Good condition. $12,000, 
book value $16,300. Call 429- 
9316. tfnsb 




BUNKET ALL VIRGINIA 

Ad Network Classifieds are 

published In 78 stata newspapers. 

4 million plus readers. 

25 WORDS $225. 

(For more than 25 words there is an additional 
charge of $8.00 per word.) 

Call S47'457X for Classified Representative 



SEIZED CARS FROM $175 
Porseh«(, Cidlllict, Chsvyt, 
BMWi, Coowttw. Alao Jaept. 4 
WO't. YoucatM. Toll free 1-800- 
SaB-»778 EM. A-S13g lor current 



AGE, HIGH MILES. EXCELLENT cMwtt bwialltl: 1-800-842-0653 

BENEFITS, QENEROUS BONUS 

PROGRAMS. HEQULAH 

HOMETIME. BURLINGTON MO- 

TORCARRIERS: 1-800-JOIN-BMC. 

EOE. 



Get A Life! 



I Not Just An Apartmsntll 



WANTED TO BUY 



Looking for parts for a 1967 Ford 
Falrlane 4 door Sedan. Pleue call 
399-7907 after 6:00 until 10:00 
pm tfn 



LUXURY APARTMENTS 
&TOWNHOMES 

FfTNEra CENTER • TENNIS COURTS 

OLVMPIC SIZE POOL • PtnTINO OREEN 

JACUni* SECURITY STAFF 

iHoCCy ^oint 

CALL 424-7867 

OnProyldsnc«Rd.,2liluWMtof 
Military HwyJOp«nMon.-SiL 9- 9 

1992 Award Of Excellence 



GOVERNMENT FORECLOSED 
HOMESIorp«nnlMonS1. Ooiln- 
quant Tu, Ropo'i, REO't. FDIC, 
RTC, IRS. Your«r»». Tolllreal- 
800-888-9778 EM. H-51 38 lor cur- 
Wit llitlngi. Fm. 

HOME TYPISTS NEEDED. Alio 
PCAMofdpraoeMoruMTi. $40,000/ 
yav MoofM potemlil. Toll IrM 1 • 
800-886-8778 Ext. T-5139 lor ij«- 
iall(. Fm. 

l9S,000/YEAn INCOME potintlal. 
RMdlng Book*. Toll Ira* 1-800- 
198-8778 Ext. R-6138 lor dattlls. 

QOT ACAMTOflOUNO MEMBER- 
SHIP OR TIMESHARE7 WE'LL 
TAKE rr, AMERICA'S MOST SUC- 
CESSFUL RESORT RESALE 
CLEAflmOHOUSE. CALL RESORT 
SAUSS INFOflMATION TOLL FREE 
HOTLINE 1-800-429-S967. 

SUNQUEST WOLFF TANNING 
BEDS Comtntroltl-Hom* Unlit 
From 8199 Buy Factory Dlrtot ind 
SAVE Call TODAY for NEW FREE 
Color Catalog 1-800-4e2-8197 

BE YOUR OWN BOSS. Urn •2600 
part-Hma $8000 (ull-llm«p«r month, 
pracaaalng Iniuranoa olalma lor 
hwHhearaprovldara. Sedwarapur- 
ohaaa required plua eempuMr, Fh 
nanolng available. 1-800-722- 



DRIVERS - Solo 8 Team*. 82000.00 
Sign On. Top Team* Earn 
1103,000*, Major BanelHa/Molel 8 
DsadheadPay. Oftvlng School Qradi 
Wslcoma. Covenant Tranaport 800- 
441-4394. Sludantt Call 800-338- 
6428. 

ATTN: EXPERIENCED TRUCK 
DRIVERS DRIVE TO OWNIII fO 
Down/78« ALL MILES OwnaraNp 
poHlbleIn ISmonthi. Avg. 10,000* 
mllai/month. Company Orlvera: 
NEWER EQUIPMENT. CompaH- 
tlvaPay/Benaflla. Call: NEW APPLE 
UNES 1-800-843-8308 or 1-800- 
843-3384 Madlion,SD. Man-Fr18- 
SPMCantral. CALLIIII 

DRIVERS • Raglonal OTR, Min. ag« 
2$,2ynOTRaxp. Aatlgned equip, 
home weekandt, ipouial rtding pro- 
gram. Qraal pay and banaflu. CaH 
1 -800-444 -0685 lor Inlo. 



South Carolina LAKEVIEW BAR- 
SAINI 118,800 Free Boat Sllpl 
Beautifully wooded lot w/lree pn- 
vMe boat Hip ki tpaeiaoular water- 
IrenieenimunliyabuninegelfaouiM. 
Paved roada, water, aewer, morel 
ExoeHenlllnanoIng, Waterfrontalio 
aveUaMe. Cell now. 800-704-3164. 
Tlmberlelie Eetaiea, 

DRIVERS: 138,000+ yearly, up to 
I.36M., be home every B-I2deyt, 
free medioel, dental. raUremam, 
11000 taip, 8S0O aalety bonui. 
Aatlgned traoton. Homedy Truck 
Una 1 •800-343-7968. 

DRIVER-HAPPY HOLIDAYS! GET 
THE BEST OVERAU PACKAQE 
AROUND. t800+/WEEK AVER- 



PRIVACY HEDOETiae Perm Uqul- 
datlon Sale 3 1/2* - 4' artwrvltaa 
(Evargraen). Regularly 129.95, Now 
$8.9S Dellvarad to your doori (10 
tree minimum) Alio, 2' Laaland 
Cyprui $8 85. Vita 8 Maitaroard, 
Oliooum Tree Farm. Phone: 1-800- 
889-8239. 

ElagentMEMORIESChapel.romen- 
tic Winter Marrlagei. Peraonallaed 
WEDDINGS any tite. Phetea,llow- 
en, video, ordelned minleier, Qe- 
labo. HONEYMOON SUITES, 
RECEPTION area, BARKINQ on 
property. 1 ■800/242-71 IB. 

Qatllnburg. 

1STAND2NDM0RTGAQE8FAST. 
Any Credit Rating. No Uplomt Feat. 
Eiiy Paymant Plant. Great Raiai. 
Call Charlet Toney at 804-2B2-0S88 
or 1-800-827-8809. CROSSTATE 
MORTQAQE. 

AAA Opportunity OTR Drtvera 'A 
Career Company 'A 1 Equlpmanl 
'A Place to Call Home likiel be at 
leatt 28 with good MVR. Call Mike 
SIdea Chellenger Motor Frelghl 1< 
600-768-3054 8 e.m. ■8 p.m. 

HAROLD IVES TRUCKING hlflng 
drivari Free Driver Trelrtng...!! you 
quality. Studanta welcome. Expe- 
rienoe pay up to 28* per mile. Ex- 



PUBLIC AUCTION COMMON- 
WEALTH OF VIRQINIA SATURDAY 
■JANUARYS, 1996 *9:00AM STATE 
SURPLUS PROPERTY WARE- 
HOUSE 1910DAraYTOWN ROAD, 
RKJHMONO, VIRQINIA COMPUT- 
ERS -COMPUTERS 'COMPUTERS 
LAP TOP, ZENITH, DATA SYS- 
TEM -LEAOINQ EDGE "IBM, XT 8 
OTHER -GRID 366 'LASER JET 
PRIffTER THINKJET PRINTERS 
■MISC. PRINTERS 'MONfTORS BY 
THE PALLET 'OTHER COMPUT- 
ERS AND PARTS BY THE PALLET 
AND UraE BOX CONTAINERS' 
lllllll ITEMS SUBJECT TO 
CHANQEIIIIIIFORADOmONALIN- 
PORMATTON CONTACT STATE 
SURPLUS PROPERTY (804) 238- 
3686. 

OTR DRIVERS/QRAOUATES 
OWNER-OPERATORS ExoeHent 
pey, banama. bonuaee. and well 
melniainedKenwertht/ealen. Con- 
tao«: Southwaatem FreIgM Cerrl- 
era, Rutherfoidton. NO 1-800-8a6- 
8746 Ext. 149. Aak for Tony. 

DEBT CONSOLIDATIONI Cut 
monthly paymenia to 80%. fleduoe 
or elimlnata mtereat 24 hr ap- 
proval. Non-profit, lleeneed 8 
bonded. 1-800-226-0180 EXT 504. 

■ROMANTIC CANDLEUrrE WED- 
DINOS' Smoky Moumelna 'Or- 
dained MinltMn 'Begem Chepel 
'Phoiognphe 'Floral* -VMeoe 'N- 
oepdone 'Honeymoon CaMn* on 
beeuUful Mountain Lake, Seehjded, 
Fully Equipped, Klloheni, 
Woodbumkig Flieplaoee, Jaounli 
■Aak AMutOurSpaolal PaokMe* 
'No Waitlng-No Blood Teat 
'aaillnbuig,Tenne*eee'l-60048S- 
7464 or 1-800-Wed-Ring. 

NEW YEAR'S DAY AUCnON-Oieat 
and^joa, ooMeottblet. 10em, Na- 
tional Ouaid Armory. Route 1005, 
juit oft Route 80, PowheMn Court- 
houae. J.A.' Tilman, Auotloneer, 
VAAn946. 604-68S-4382. 

EOrrOR AND QENERAL MAN- 
AOER ■ Needed for ewert-wlnning 
Pege Oaunqr waea^f. CandWWe 
muat have a Mreng nawa baek- 
ground, pki* knoa^M^ of adve^ 
MngandolreuMontoMlene. Send 
lBaum«loRJ.MO(ln,sADellyNewa- 
Neeart,P.O. BealBS, Hentoenbuig, 
VA2M01. An Equti finployment 
Oppoikjnlly Employer, 



i* 




3:« 



Ybu Reach For 

IhE Sledgehammdv 
Reach RsR IhE Phone 



/ 




Caul TkE Auto Sakiy HoiuNL 




:• • 



The toll-free Auto Safety Hotline is your 
chance to h^ tfie p^mment identify 
safety probl^ns in cars, trucks, and auto- 
motive equipment If a sa^-related defect 
is identified, the manufacturer \mII conduct 



a recall and fix the problem at no o^ to the 
cwner. Your call ^ the process started and 
can help keep unsafe vehicle off the road. 



o 



UM* H^poniiiefn Of IfafnpOinlfNNi 

ftl^iiaM^ IMmIii III T I M >^.fc , *-«■■« — 



mm 



^MaMaaMaaMBaaaaMaMaMHBHHllHIHHiHMHMHHMnHH 



H Vifginia Beach Sun. Friday. Decembor 29, 1995 



Upcoming 
Events 



Clubs 



Meals On Wbeels will be the 
program topic for the monthly 
meeting of the Princess Anne 
AARP Ch^Mer. Tuesday. Jan. 9 m 
1 p.m. The spetka will be Mary F. 
Stowe, executive director for Meals 
On Wheels of Virginia Beach. The 
meeting will be at the Princess 
Anne Recreation Center, 1400 
Ferrell Pkwy. Visitors are 
welcmne. Call 427-3652. for more 
infcMmation. 



Civic 



An individual is iweded who will 
provide computer support for the 
Volunteer Council; maintain data 
base; install software; provide 
informal and formal software 
training and suiqxnt Qualifications 
include intermediate knowledge of 
DOS and Windows; basic 
understanding of LAN; familiarity 
with Novell Netware; experience 
with IBM-compatible computer 
hardware. 

Hours are a minimum of 15 
houra pa month (flexible schedule). 
Volunteer will gain hands-on 
technical experience with the latest 
volunteer software installed on a 
wide-area-netwoik (WAN). 



Education 



Response Sexual Assault 
Suf^XHt Services is sponsoring a 
self defense course for women 
beginning Mcmday. Jan. 8 and 
running on consecutive Mondays 
through Feb. 5 from 6:30 - 9 p.m. 
To be held at the Virginia Self 
Defense Task Force Studio, 5631 
Princess Anne Rd., Virginia Beach, 
Cost for the course is $49. To 
register, call 497-3951. 

This course has been designed, 
and will be presented, with the 
sensitive issues of women's 
conc»ns about safety in mind. All 
Virginia Self Defense Task Force 
instructors, in Edition to being 
martial arts experts, have completed 
rape crisis intervention training. 
This dual emphasis allows f^ the 
most axnplete instruction possible, 
that women may (tevelop their self- 
protection skills and safety 
awareness in a supportive, 
c(»nf(Htable envirorunenL 

The fffice of the course incluttes 
12 1/2 hours of instruction, a self- 
defiense manual and a key bau»t 



Health 



Viiginia Beach Gs^al Ho^ital 
will hdd a Breast Cancer Suppcnt 
Group meeting on Monday, Jan. 8 
at 7 p.m. in the Health Education 
Center, located across from the 
boqntd's Emeigency Center. 

Tliis free service for breast cancer 
patients and their families offers 
both educational and emotional 
support. The support group meets 
on the second Monday of every 
month. Fot mrae infomation, call 
481-8393. 



Religion 



Catholic Charities of Hampton 
Roads is offering a Parental 
Placement Adoption Workshop 
for couples considering an open 
adoption on Thursday, Jan. 11 at 7 
p.m. The woAshop will be held at 
Catholic Charities, 4855 Princess 
Anne Rd., Virginia Beach. Call 
467-7707 to register. There is a 
$10 fee per couple. 



Recreation 



The Christmas holidays are not 
officially over until the Francis 
Land House celebrates Twelfth 
Night! The early Virginians 
celebrated during the 12 days aftet 
Christmas. Their season ended with 
a big celebration on Jan. 6 — the 
12th day of Christmas. 

Wrjq>-up your holidays and relive 
the magical splendor of a 
traditional 18th-eentury Twelfth 
Night at the historic Francis Land 
House in Virginia Beach on 
Saturday, Jan. 6 from 6 - 8:30 p.m. 
tours are given every 10 minutes. 

Step back in time to 1783 and 
meet Francis Land and his 
plantation household, dance ^with 
the Williamsburg Hoitage JDance 
Ensemble and enjoy 18th-century 
music performed by local 
musicians. Partake of Twelfth 
Night cake provided by the Friends 
of the Francis Land House. The 
evening will feature the traditional 
burning of et Christmas greens 
around a bonfire with music 
provided by the Princess Anne High 
School Madrigals. 

Admission is $3 for adults and $2 
for students (6 to 18). Call 431- 
4(XX) fen- information. 



Two storytimes will be held at 
the Pungo-Blackwater Library (922 
Princess Anne Rd.) on the 
following dates: "Messy, Dirty, 
Qean and Neat" Suaytime will be 
held on Thursday, Jan. 11 at 10:30 
a.m., "Moose" Storytime will be 
held on Thursday, Jan. 25 at 10:30 
a.m. 



Genealogy tours will be given at 
the Central Library (4100 Virginia 
Beach Blvd.) at 109:% a.m. and 
7:30 p.m. on Jan. 4, K&rch 7, May 
2, Sept. 5, Oct 3 and Nov. 7. 
These toors are pres^ted by the 
Virginia Beach Genealogical 
Society. Call 431-3071 to register. 
The so{;iety meets the second 
Thursday of each month except 
June - August at 7:30 p.m. in the 



Central Liteary Auditorium, they 
also have classes beginning t& 6:30 
p.m. in the sttHytime room ptkx to 
dw meeting. 

Make plans to attend the third 
annual New Year's Eve Gala 
sponsored by the Virginia Beach 
Jaycees. The gala will be held at. the 
Virgir.ia Beach Center for the Arts, 
2200 Parks Ave. The black tie 



((^tional) party will inclutte hors 
d'ocuvres, beverages, party favors 
and dancing from 8:30 p.m. - 1 
a.m. 

Tickets are $30 per persona and 
can be obtained by calling Rick 
Lai^Jands at 463-7049. The tehees 
have ananged tuxedo rentals ami 
hotel room discounts for guests as 
well. 



Anyone wishing to woric Iwids- 
on widi mimals and learn aboitt the 
environment and wildlife 
con^rvation is needed as a 
Viiguiia Zoo edw»tion volunteor. 
Two courses are available aad 
cMittnoe for six weeks for a new 
"flock' of volonteas. 
Cidl the Virginia Zoo EdueMim 
DqMBtment at 626-0^)3 to r^^mr 
for iMs wiki advnuure. 




PIMM by Caroli J. AnwH 



It Takes Two Day 
proclaimed here 

The American Red Cross, In 
conjunction with the World 
Health Organization, established 
the "It Takes Two" program to 
reduce underage drinking. Local 
merchants are being asked to 
request two forms of ID for the 
purchase of any alcohol or 
tobacco products. On hand for 
Virginia Beach Mayor Meyera 
Cbemdorf s proclamation signing, 
above from left, were Stephen 
Behnkin, Ginny Behnkin and Ron 
Pritchard of the American Red 
Cross, 3s well as Norbert Lundy 
of Food Uon Supermarkets. 
Obcmdorf. right, was joined l^ 
Donald E. MIddleton, chairman of 
the Virginia Bc^ch Service Center 
of the American Red Cross, for 
thesign^g. 




Hampton Roads on the Move 



Hampton Roads on the Move Deadlines: 

Naws deadline is Wednesdays at noon for put^ication in the next weelt's 
new^Mipers. Advertising deadline is Tuesday at 2 p.m. for pubik^atnn in that 
week's issues. Hami^n Roads on the Move is publislied every Friday in The 
Vi^inia Beach Sun, The Chesapeake Post and The Portsmouth Times. The 
newspapers are available around-the-clock at newspaper boxes, or you can 
haw them delivered through the mail to your home or business. Please 
indiKie your name and phone number. Send all materials to: 

Hanyton Roads 

onthtMove 

eto Th» ChMapMke Post 

1024 N. BattlafMd Boulward Chesapeake VA 23320 

Phom: S47-4S71 Fax: 54«^>M0 



A^ ^a 

ALPHA OMEGA Services 

Electrical Air Conditioning 

Plumbing Heating 

Painting Minor Carpentry 

Floor Drywall 

486-7771 
498-3529 

AQ Your Home's Handyman A^ 



Black joins John W. Brown's Chesapeake law firm 



For more dian 20 years, John 
W. Brown has been practicing 
law in Chesapeake in the aieas of 
criminal, traffic an personal 
injury law. Now, he and his 
associate, Keith Denslow, 
welcome South Norfolk native 
Hugh E. "Teddy" Black ffl into 
their new offices at 411 Cedar 
Road. 

As a former prosecutor in 
Chesapeake, Brown has the 



knowledge and experience to help 
those families who find 
themselves lost in the legal fog 
that follows the arrest of a family 
member. That legal experience is 
a result of being in the courtroom 
on a daily basis. 

That ability also allows Brown 
and his associates to help those 
injured in automobile collisions 
as well as those those have lost a 
love one due to the carelessness 
of others. 



' Since 1980, Brown and his 
partners have collected millions 
of dollars for their injured clients 
and for the families of d«:eased 
clients who have died because of 
someone else's acticms. 

Whedier the issue is a sim{^ 
U'afflc ticket (s a more serious 
problem which requires a trial by 
jury. Brown, Denslow and Black 
provide a team approach which, 
with their able support staff, 
allows the client to undostand all 



the options and recognize what is 
really at risk. 

With no charge for initial 
consultations, flexible 
appointment hours and home 
visite, if necessary, everyone's 
first legal visit can be a 
ccmtoOBJakcxpcaaxx. 

Brown, Denslow «- Black can 
be reachnl at 547-^)00 Monday 
through Friday, or at 411 Cedar 
Rd. in Chesapeake. 




CAREER OPPORTUNITY 




blS—mL 







teven B. Powers , M.D. 
Peter J. Kemp, M.D. 

Board Certifltd OB/GYN 

Susan Preston, N.P. 



Obstetrics & G^^cohgy 

noHdfaig Faodly Ccntared hv^atel Care 

^ Bfatt Coniral • Gyiira>k)sic k lam Snigay 

el^^lwcclopy 

ebitetf^eAbnofiMi 

Pi^ • Ditttkti k Trwted 

495-9400 ""^-'^ 436-0167 

ntaPrandatceU. WKintsborM^ Square 

Sitiuioi smc 

V A Beach Ci^epa^ ^ 




Operate Your Own Insurance Agency 

Represent A Leader In The Insurance Industry 

Unlunitcd Income Potential and Retirement Security 

Renewal Equity/Own Your Own Business 

Kap CuiTcnt Employment While Training 

Astiowself: "Does My Present Job Offer Me This?" 
"Am I Willing To Develop A Career That Does?" 

LET'S TALK ABOUT YOUR FUTURE? 

(CoUe^ Degree Preferred) 



547-1701 



or 

Send Resume: 1 108 Madison Plaza, Suite 203 

Owstpeake, VA 23320 



Edith J. Cohen, M.D. 



^^e are pleaseti to welcome 
tolhe DeUhul Medical Qtrntp. 



hoard Certified: Internal Medicine 

Now Accepting New Patients 

1270 DiamcxKJ ^>nngs Ro^, Suite TIO 

Virginia teach. VA 23455 

^04)464-6944